#1
Well,I'm GASing for an older LP custom,but I'm unsure of the overall quality of the guitars Gibson was producing during the latter part of the 70's and the early 80's.How does the quality of these older models compare to more recent offers from the company?

I really should know more about this subject,but I don't,so meh....any help from more knowledgeable folks is appreciated.

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#2
If I am not mistaken(and if I am someone will correct me in five minutes anyway) the late 70's and 80's guitars for both Gibson and Fender saw a huge decline in quality control
The best ones were the 60's and early 70's models until(again not sure if i am right on this one) gibson moved its factory from kalmazoo to Nashville under new management or somthing along those lines
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#3
Quote by Shayne777
If I am not mistaken(and if I am someone will correct me in five minutes anyway) the late 70's and 80's guitars for both Gibson and Fender saw a huge decline in quality control
The best ones were the 60's and early 70's models until(again not sure if i am right on this one) gibson moved its factory from kalmazoo to Nashville under new management or somthing along those lines

sort of

the '50s gibsons are said to be the best as far as their electric guitars go, but they'll cost you about the same amount of money as a nice house... and the early '60s guitars are pretty good too - i think norlin took over in 1966 or 1967 and that's when there was a huge decline in the quality control - of course that doesn't mean there aren't any excellent guitars made under norlin. The quality control picked up again in 1983-84ish when norlin sold the company to its current owners.

the new gibsons are sort of in limbo between the best and the worst of the norlins - aside from the historic reissues and such which imo are far better than the best of the norlins. though nowadays the quality is a lot more consistent than UG will have you believe but the end result is though you won't find a truly worthless gibson that's best off as firewood when you buy new but you're also in with less of a chance of finding anything particularly spectacular. Given that '70s gibsons tend to cost about the same as a brand new gibson i see no harm in trying out both vintage and new and anything between, in that respect, and picking very very carefully - when the right one comes along you'll know about it.

edit: i apologise for the fact my last paragraph is worded very badly
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Last edited by Blompcube at Sep 11, 2010,
#4
Quote by Blompcube
sort of

the '50s gibsons are said to be the best as far as their electric guitars go, but they'll cost you about the same amount of money as a nice house... and the early '60s guitars are pretty good too - i think norlin took over in 1966 or 1967 and that's when there was a huge decline in the quality control - of course that doesn't mean there aren't any excellent guitars made under norlin. The quality control picked up again in 1983-84ish when norlin sold the company to its current owners.

the new gibsons are sort of in limbo between the best and the worst of the norlins - aside from the historic reissues and such which imo are far better than the best of the norlins. though nowadays the quality is a lot more consistent than UG will have you believe but the end result is though you won't find a truly worthless gibson that's best off as firewood when you buy new but you're also in with less of a chance of finding anything particularly spectacular. Given that '70s gibsons tend to cost about the same as a brand new gibson i see no harm in trying out both vintage and new and anything between, in that respect, and picking very very carefully - when the right one comes along you'll know about it.

edit: i apologise for the fact my last paragraph is worded very badly




Poor wording aside,it was informative,and that's all that matters.

I want an older silverburst model,since I think think they look fantastic once they age,but all I could find were models made in between 1978 and 1980.I'll keep trolling the web for more info,and hopefully get some more opinions from UG.

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#5
Gibson vary so much that there's not much point worrying about 'bad years' or whatever anyway. Just play some, see what works out for you. A Gibson can read like perfection online but it might be rubbish once you're actually playing it. Conversely a Gibson can sound unsuitable at first but then turns out to be great once you've got it in your hands. You shouldn't be buying any Gibson without trying it first, so there's no point worrying about what spec sheets or the history books say.
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#6
Quote by MrFlibble
Gibson vary so much that there's not much point worrying about 'bad years' or whatever anyway. Just play some, see what works out for you. A Gibson can read like perfection online but it might be rubbish once you're actually playing it. Conversely a Gibson can sound unsuitable at first but then turns out to be great once you've got it in your hands. You shouldn't be buying any Gibson without trying it first, so there's no point worrying about what spec sheets or the history books say.


Good point.

In that case I might as well just try the newer SB customs until I find one I like,since they're a lot easier to find and test.I was prepared to drive to New Hampshire to test out an '80 SB,but I'll just drive to NYC and peruse the music stores there instead.

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#7
Chances are a used Norlin era LP will cost as much as a new LP. Customs though are expensive period! For less than the price of a USA LP Custom you can pretty well get a new Custom Shop VOS 57 GT or 58 Plain Top. IMO these would kill a LP Custom.
Norlin ear construction was quite differnet from 1953-60, 68 and post early 80's when Gibson was bought out. They tried several innovations that some love and other hate. Some of these are 3 -piece maple necks, pancake multipiece bodies, volutes to strengthen the headstock/neck joint.
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Last edited by KenG at Sep 11, 2010,
#8
if you can't try it out first then buying an old guitar just because you want an older guitar is foolish. being an old geezer i've had the chance to play many older guitars and can honestly say that many of them don't live up to the hype. late 70s and early 80s fenders and gibsons were definitely a mixed bag and we all knew it even back then. paying "vintage" prices for them really doesn't make much sense as many of the newer models are in fact better.
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
if you can't try it out first then buying an old guitar just because you want an older guitar is foolish. being an old geezer i've had the chance to play many older guitars and can honestly say that many of them don't live up to the hype. late 70s and early 80s fenders and gibsons were definitely a mixed bag and we all knew it even back then. paying "vintage" prices for them really doesn't make much sense as many of the newer models are in fact better.


Nobody said anything about buying a guitar without trying it.I extensively test any new musical purchase,and this guitar will be no different.I'm also not buying an old guitar just for the sake of getting an old guitar either.The SB finish is pretty rare as far as I've seen,and the new reissue customs are in limited production I believe,so by the time I save up enough to buy one they might not be around which leaves me with the used market to find one,and it might be an older model.

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