#1
i just tuned my guitar to this tuning and im starting to wonder "why?" the only movable chords ive been able to figure out are triads and 7 chords (minor, major, augmented, diminished, dominant 7, etc.), which would seem great and all but i can only play these chords on the low 4 strings, the top 2 are kind of being wasted. help me add more notes in this tuning, and figure out more shapes/inversions? thanks!
#3
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#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Every chord is movable as long as it's a barre chord (or doesn't use any open strings.

Just figure out the chords and move them. It's really not that hard man.

oh yeah i kinda knew that im just having trouble with adding anymore notes than 7. these are the chords ive found movable shapes for:

major triad
minor triad
augmented triad
diminished triad
and then i can add minor and major 7s to those chords.

i can't find any other movable chords, like the 9s, 11s, 13s, etc., i would think they're easy to find on the 2 high strings but they aren't, i haven't even been able to use those high strings for anything interesting so far.
#6
haha its tuned in 5ths cept for the last string (which is a 3rd)

ask a violinist for his arpeggio fingerins
#7
Isn't the whole point of New Standard to throw away all old ideas and start over?
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#8
Quote by J.A.M
Isn't the whole point of New Standard to throw away all old ideas and start over?

i didnt know there really was a point to it, i thought robert fripp just liked this tuning better?

and there's a violinist in my band i could ask but im wondering what i can do with the 2 high strings? violins have 4 strings. should i just play the chords i figured out on the low strings and only use the high 2 for melody?
#9
So if you don't know the point to the tuning, why use it?

Stick to Standard, you can play everything from it.
#10
why not try different voicings and inversions of chords and using rootless voicings and 1-3-7 voicings. Also, even if you only have access to triads, you can do a lot with them. If you consider the notes in a CM triad and a Dm triad, you have every note but the 7th of a C13. If you consider the harmonic implications of a CM triad (the notes C E G), you can realize it can function as C Major, G minor 6th or G suspended. You can also realize that you have the b9, 11 and b13 tensions on a B chord, an A minor seventh chord without the root, an F Major 9th chord without the third and root (which I guess would make it a suspended chord), the seventh and 9 and 11 of a D chord, and the 9, #11 and 13 tensions on a Bb chord, and I'm just scratching the surface. A triad (3 note structure built on thirds, and also any chord for that matter) has a different function in relation to all 12 notes of the chromatic scale, some of which are unusable but MANY of which are very usable. Maybe you should explore just playing triads when you need to provide harmony if you are so hell bent on using that tuning and can't find other movable forms?
#11
Robert Fripp is a weird guy.

But...

C Maj 0 0 2 3 0 0
C Min 0 0 1 3 3 0
C M7 0 0 2 2 0 0
Cm7 0 0 1 3 3 3
C7 0 0 2 3 0 3
CM9 0 0 0 2 0 0

Some chord forms I've worked out. Ive never played this tuning but I just mapped the fretboard.

I don't see the big deal, honestly.

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 12, 2010,
#12
Since it's tuned in fifths it's "supposed" to take the guitarist out of his familiar lick patterns in order to play something fresh. I dont think it's mainly for regular chords but for new patterns and some new voicings.

Unless it serves a purpose, I think asking for a tuning just for the weirdness of it is like pianist asking if they could change the layout of the piano so he can get new ideas. the person makes the music not the instrument.

BTW at least for basses, I don't play guitar, there is a reason why it was chosen for them to be tuned in fourths as opposed to the fifths tuning of the other string instruments. It was near impossible to play some of the pieces of the time with a fifths tuning. There is a lot more stretching involved.
#15
Just warning you TS, if you commit yourself to this new tuning, you will have to completely relearn how to play guitar.
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#16
Quote by GoIrish668
Just warning you TS, if you commit yourself to this new tuning, you will have to completely relearn how to play guitar.


So he will instantly forget how to hammer-on and pull-off? And how to play legato? And how to sweep? And all other skills he's learned?

He'll just have to relearn where notes are and where certain intervals are. Not really much more to it.
#17
Quote by timeconsumer09
So he will instantly forget how to hammer-on and pull-off? And how to play legato? And how to sweep? And all other skills he's learned?

He'll just have to relearn where notes are and where certain intervals are. Not really much more to it.


He won't be able to do those techniques half well if he doesn't know what he's playing.

Having to relearn the fretboard, especially with a weird tuning like that means that he will have to relearn to sight read, won't be able to use tabs, have to figure out scales, chords and other patterns because they are all completely different on the fretboard, on top of learning new technique because of the way the notes are more stretching is required so sweeping will have to be relearned.


I found more info here, now I'm somewhat intrigued.

http://baatkarlo-aol.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!C3D0B0320F74324B!831.entry


I used to be interested in it for bass, but I never kept it because you have to relearn bass technique almost because of the gaps between the notes, plus there was no point in sacrificing essential things I could easily do on fourths that were impossible on fifths. I dont think that should be much of a problem with the guitar though.
#18
Quote by Pillo114
So if you don't know the point to the tuning, why use it?

Stick to Standard, you can play everything from it.

well i dont realy know why but i LOVE this tuning. i've always HATED the guitar with a deep firey passion, but used it anyway because i have some hard rock in my system right now. i was thinking when i got over all this guitar-heavy stuff i'd replace it with a piano, but i discovered this tuning on wikipedia and all the sudden i love the instrument! more notes too, its like drop C without feeling like ur required to play metal. and then like 3 higher notes too. i dont really have a reason to like this tuning, im just more comfortable with it, even if i suck at using it.

and i've figured out the scale patterns for it, eastern scales are easier now too. those high strings are still mostly being unused, at least for chords.

i havent read the other replies yet haha this is gonna take a while

but i have another question, im the bassist in my band, so if i use this tuning to write songs, do i need to tune my bass to it or to drop C or something? i really don't wanna re-tune my bass, i dont have a tuner and my ears SUCK in the bass-range
#19
Quote by TMVATDI
but i have another question, im the bassist in my band, so if i use this tuning to write songs, do i need to tune my bass to it or to drop C or something? i really don't wanna re-tune my bass, i dont have a tuner and my ears SUCK in the bass-range

You can tune your bass to whatever you want as long as you know what notes your playing. Notes don't change (aside from gaining/losing notes) from tuning to tuning.

If you want to play exactly the some thing as the guitar... then tune you're bass to it.
#20
Basically as I see it, its a return to the ears, a new language with its own rules and discoveries. I see it more as an aural challenge than a theory one. I have been listening to some of the ideas from this tuning, and I don't know, it seems.....different...cool in an unfamiliar way. I have 30 guitars, so I might just take one of them and dedicate it to this tuning, just to play with. I'm going to check with my sting manufacturers and see if they have any NST sets. If not, its no problem to assemble my own.

Im not into Ovations at all but it would be interesting to check out their NST guitar.

Sean
#21
Ahh come on the guitars in your guitar store don't count

Im joking hehe.

You should read up on bassists that do that tuning as well if it is any help, especially double bassists. You get a better sound and resonance because of the strings being in fifths.