#1
Hey whattup all guitarists!

I've been playing guitar for well over 20 years now and I am developing a product on how to play guitar and I wanted to get your feedback on what your top 10 questions are.

Thanks so much and keep rockin!
Last edited by tabufx50 at Sep 12, 2010,
#2
You realize... Blues is not something a guitarist needs. That would be like if I was disappointed every guitarist didn't play my kind of metal... it's just ignorant.

I could play it if my heart so desires, but that's because I listen/emulate.

As for your product, I think a good starting question could be "What is the 12-Bar Blues and how do I apply it to my playing?".
#3
my top question would probably be why do you want to add another basic blues guitar program/product to the already existing multitudes out there?
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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axe-fx II

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Quote by crisisinheaven
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#5
Hmm, I'll help out.

I think a huge question is "How do I break out of these pentatonic-style shapes?" - I myself have felt very restricted at times because I didn't know how to play outside of the typical scale patterns, and as a result I would end up doing the same-old licks every "improv" session.
#8
What are modes and how do I fit them into my playing?
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Quote by voodoochild23
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#9
Quote by SilverSpurs616
Come on guys, it's Sunday. Take a break from the half-arsed attempts at trolling and help the guy out!
Actually, I just figure that if he's actually gonna sell this stuff, why should we help him? It's like doing your homework; it's your job, not mine.

Edit: Besides, I'm Messianic Jewish. We take the day off on Saturday.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 12, 2010,
#10
On how to play "killer" guitar?

ohhhh k.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#11
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Actually, I just figure that if he's actually gonna sell this stuff, why should we help him? It's like doing your homework; it's your job, not mine.



Actually, he's doing what every wise manufacturer does- researching his target market.
#12
Lets see, back in May you made a thread talking about how you have problems switching between chords, and having a nice clean transition. But now just 4 months later you are an expert player of 20 years and your going to make a video showing us how to play "killer guitar" Uh huh, yea...........


Quote by SilverSpurs616
Actually, he's doing what every wise manufacturer does- researching his target market.

Actually it seems he's just full of it. And wasting our time.
Last edited by Matt420740 at Sep 12, 2010,
#13
Quote by Matt420740
Lets see, back in May you made a thread talking about how you have problems switching between chords, and having a nice clean transition. But now just 4 months later you are an expert player of 20 years and your going to make a video showing us how to play "killer guitar" Uh huh, yea...........


Actually it seems he's just full of it. And wasting our time.



Sure, HE's the timewaster..
#14
How to learn theory well, and making it fun. (Its not a question, but I think its essential)
I find learning theory an absolute drag and so I can never be bothered to get off my lazy ass and do it. I think you'd need to make learning all the complex but necessary things more fun.
Gear:
Epiphone SG-400 (w/Hot Slags)/Chapman Guitars ML1 > Digitech Bad Monkey > Blackstar HT-5 > Danelectro Fish and Chips EQ > ETI Chorus Flanger
Snark Headstock tuner!
#15
Quote by Matt420740
Lets see, back in May you made a thread talking about how you have problems switching between chords, and having a nice clean transition. But now just 4 months later you are an expert player of 20 years and your going to make a video showing us how to play "killer guitar" Uh huh, yea...........


Actually it seems he's just full of it. And wasting our time.



Maybe he has a time machine. Hey, it's remotely possible.
#16
Quote by DiminishedFifth
You realize... Blues is not something a guitarist needs. That would be like if I was disappointed every guitarist didn't play my kind of metal... it's just ignorant.



I'd have to disagree with this. Frank Gambale sums it up pretty well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwnPpU1VDrg
#17
Quote by Matt420740
Lets see, back in May you made a thread talking about how you have problems switching between chords, and having a nice clean transition. But now just 4 months later you are an expert player of 20 years and your going to make a video showing us how to play "killer guitar" Uh huh, yea...........


Actually it seems he's just full of it. And wasting our time.

If he can make such massive improvements in just 4 months I'd be willing to give his book a read
#18
All kidding aside... I just wrapped up a lesson with one of my students and our lesson was about hamburgers. Seriously. I likened playing a plain, vanilla scale to an ordinary hamburger. We talked about embellishing the "hamburger" with dynamics, such as bends, double-stops and slides. Also showed him some basic blues licks that he can use. We took the hamburger from plain to extraordinary. Even if you play the basic scale pattern, adding embellishments to it will take it to the next level. This is something you can also teach. My student isn't yet a master of playing lead, but he took his ordinary scales and transformed them to the next level.
#19
Quote by griffRG7321
I'd have to disagree with this. Frank Gambale sums it up pretty well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwnPpU1VDrg


I see what he's saying, and agree, but do you really NEED to play blues to learn all of that? I taught (and am still teaching, actually) myself those techniques, but I only play blues when I feel like improving over a I-IV-V.

You can get something from every genre, but you don't NEED a certain genre to teach it to you.
#20
ha....ah yes guitarist are sometimes a tough bunch...eh..and everyone's a comedian.

Ok...Yeah my initial post back in May was a from a common frustration that I received from several students of mine and not a frustration of mine personally. In retrospect, I probably should've stated that more clearly in the post initially. However, I was looking for some other common frustrations that other beginners were having and wanted to get feedback from this forum. Sheesh.
#21
Quote by griffRG7321
I'd have to disagree with this. Frank Gambale sums it up pretty well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwnPpU1VDrg



I agree. No matter which style of music you play, chances are, it has influences from some other style. The lesson I just wrapped up was focused very heavily on the blues style.
#22
Quote by tabufx50
ha....ah yes guitarist are sometimes a tough bunch...eh..and everyone's a comedian.

Ok...Yeah my initial post back in May was a from a common frustration that I received from several students of mine and not a frustration of mine personally. In retrospect, I probably should've stated that more clearly in the post initially. However, I was looking for some other common frustrations that other beginners were having and wanted to get feedback from this forum. Sheesh.



Yeah, but not to beat you over the head, but if you've been playing 20 years and have that kind of experience, you should know how to overcome those issues and problems. That's why you are being paid by your students - because you have the expertise and the ability to teach them what you know. This is the very thing I bring to the table with my students. I know something they don't and I know how to convey a technique to them, or recognize a problem and offer a solution. Take for example, my lesson a few minutes ago. I was teaching finger slides from a half and full step up. My student was having some difficulty, so I offered a couple of different solutions, then watched as he practiced the technique he'd learned. If I had to go to the internet and ask the good folks of U-G how to teach a slide, maybe I shouldn't be instructing in the first place. Again, I'm not trying to beat you over the head.
#23
questions:

how do you apply modes to playing?
how do you construct chords (power chords, major, minor, audmented, diminished, sus2, sus4, and then extended chords)?
how do you apply the major/minor pentatonic scale to playing?
what are horizontal and verticle thinking?
what chords, scales (go over as many different scales as possible, even exotic ones nobody's heard about), modes, and dynamics have what effects?
how can you learn to sight-read easily?
how are odd time signatures used (just go over everything about rhythm guitarists culd need to use)?
what chord progressions are common to what styles?
how do you sweep pick and double-handed-tap (or whatever its called, the thing in eruption)?
how to handle non-diatonic chords and how to solo over more chords than just major and minor with extensions?

i know these might look too advanced for beginner guitarists but they really aren't if you teach them right. of course you have to go over the very basic basics first, like very basic technique for the right and left hand
#24
Quote by griffRG7321
I'd have to disagree with this. Frank Gambale sums it up pretty well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwnPpU1VDrg



This is a pretty weak video admittedly.

"There's all sorts of vibrato" "It's the subtleties"

"Make the guitar sing!"


That's pretty much all he said, which has nothing to do with the blues, but good music in general...
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#25
"young people miss out learning the blues because they want to play metal/whatever, learning the blues teachers you alot about phrasing and vibrato"

You can tell people when someone does a solo and hasn't worked on those above things, and the outcome is not good.
#26
I have a question.

If you are putting out a product, why are you putting it out? Are you trying to make money? When putting something out, there should be an endgame other than money in mind. Unless you are trying to address the top 10 questions out there.

Incidentally I'm convinced that no product can address the questions out there, because if a product is honest enough, then it will lose catchphrases like "instant" "master" and other BS terms to disguise their marketing crap.

I say this because we know that to learn how to form chords its NOT instantaneous. To answer the top 10 questions, takes TIME and WORK. Well If I market a product that says:

Improvise like a pro, all it takes is enough time and study, follow our lesson plan and in 6 months to a year, you'll be there, provided you apply what you learn through metromone practice, careful study and lots of playing!

Well I dont hear people beating down the doors for that...if a lesson or product is going to represent itself honestly, it cannot throw out candy coated garbage like - play Blues with only 5 notes...that's a gimmick to fool the stupid and hungry.

My question is, what product is going to answer the questions without demanding a realistic investment? People buy these products because they want big payoffs with little effort required. That's unrealistic.

Best,

Sean
#27
+1 to Sean

The best product is the one that will keep the customer going to it, and if you achieve that in a music education book, video or other; people will want to keep coming back to it over and over and making the time and effort required to progress a not so strenuous task.


"young people miss out learning the blues because they want to play metal/whatever, learning the blues teachers you alot about phrasing and vibrato"

You can tell people when someone does a solo and hasn't worked on those above things, and the outcome is not good.


Agreed. I just spent a whole month working off of Duane Allman's slide vibrato on my fretless.

I think I could go as far to say that the avoidance of blues by most of our generation is the direct culprit to why the role of lead guitarist doesn't really exist any more. When was last time you heard someone phrasing behind a singer?

It's not the listeners that decide if a guitar solo is boring or not, they don't know anything about music. It's the influences of the musicians and producers that set the trends for the listeners to follow.
#28
Quote by Pillo114
I think I could go as far to say that the avoidance of blues by most of our generation is the direct culprit to why the role of lead guitarist doesn't really exist any more. When was last time you heard someone phrasing behind a singer?

It's not the listeners that decide if a guitar solo is boring or not, they don't know anything about music. It's the influences of the musicians and producers that set the trends for the listeners to follow.

Periphery, Protest the Hero
#30
Sean nails the hammer with his head again. I'm with what he's saying.

The TS seems a bit like a snake oiler...
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#31
Quote by TMVATDI
questions:

how do you apply modes to playing?
how do you construct chords (power chords, major, minor, audmented, diminished, sus2, sus4, and then extended chords)?
how do you apply the major/minor pentatonic scale to playing?
what are horizontal and verticle thinking?
what chords, scales (go over as many different scales as possible, even exotic ones nobody's heard about), modes, and dynamics have what effects?
how can you learn to sight-read easily?
how are odd time signatures used (just go over everything about rhythm guitarists culd need to use)?
what chord progressions are common to what styles?
how do you sweep pick and double-handed-tap (or whatever its called, the thing in eruption)?
how to handle non-diatonic chords and how to solo over more chords than just major and minor with extensions?

i know these might look too advanced for beginner guitarists but they really aren't if you teach them right. of course you have to go over the very basic basics first, like very basic technique for the right and left hand



Thanks man for some cool and considerate input and not just angered angst bashing at an attempt to try and look cool.
#32
im not sure if i agree with the blues thing or not. being a blues based player mostly, im inclined to agree. but im not sure if the skills learned by playing blues can ONLY be learned by playing blues. but i think if you are going to play rock, pop, or jazz, not being able to play blues is probably going to hurt you a lot.

now imho, the people ive met who cant play blues, usually cannot improvise very well at all. some are great players but can improvise at all. blues kinda forces you to improvise i think. its a huge part of what the blues is. of course in jazz and rock it is too but whats the most basic thing to improv over? a blues progression. if you cant do that, you probably arent going to do as well over other things.

that being said, that might not always be the case. for example, i dont expect paco de lucia to be able to pull off a great blues solo. but he can play flamenco like nobodys business.

so i think as long as you practice the things blues can teach you, you dont need to play actual blues to get it. it couldnt hurt though.
#33
Quote by Sean0913
If you only knew how many of my students LOVE Protest the Hero - Theory does strange things to the informed

That's cause they have good music taste ;]

I'm not quite sure what the second part means though...
#34
Quote by tabufx50
Hey whattup all guitarists!

I've been playing guitar for well over 20 years now and I am developing a product on how to play guitar and I wanted to get your feedback on what your top 10 questions are.

Thanks so much and keep rockin!



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Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


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How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#35
I'd really want to be sure that my product was "different" or "special" in some way before attempting to enter the market with it. I've looked over some newer types for learning guitar, one worked on the concept that the entire fretboard was symmetrical and that there was a "string-split" involved. Interesting stuff.

But whoever invented the CAGED idea - that's brilliant. I didn't learn what it was until some 7 years after I started learning and I think that's probably what I needed when I began starting to learn scales. If someone could beat the CAGED method, that would be impressive indeed, but to make it as commercially popular to use would be near impossible I believe.

Anyway, as a teacher, you should really know what kids want to learn on guitar. What separates you though (hopefully) is guiding them towards what they "should learn first" rather than "learn now". This would avoid the common problem of kids playing for two years and still not have the ability to play open or barre chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#36
Quote by AlanHB
I'd really want to be sure that my product was "different" or "special" in some way before attempting to enter the market with it. I've looked over some newer types for learning guitar, one worked on the concept that the entire fretboard was symmetrical and that there was a "string-split" involved. Interesting stuff.

But whoever invented the CAGED idea - that's brilliant. I didn't learn what it was until some 7 years after I started learning and I think that's probably what I needed when I began starting to learn scales.



Joe Pass invented CAGED. It's brilliant I suppose for what it is, and I'm glad it's helped you.

Quote by AlanHB


If someone could beat the CAGED method, that would be impressive indeed, but to make it as commercially popular to use would be near impossible I believe.


It's already happened. As for making it commercially popular...it's already started.

Sean
#37
Quote by Sean0913
Joe Pass invented CAGED. It's brilliant I suppose for what it is, and I'm glad it's helped you.


Hmm, I found out about it a little too late to actually use it to learn scales. But in terms of visualising the fretboard in a different way I think it's very accessible.


Quote by Sean0913
It's already happened. As for making it commercially popular...it's already started.

Sean


Intriguing. Your own method? Someone elses? Link or description?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#38
Quote by AlanHB


Intriguing. Your own method? Someone elses? Link or description?


Mine, yes. But like anything else, it takes a while, it's spreading word of mouth. Recognition's already started. I just got named the Texan of the Week, for the results it's had here in Texas, by the Texas State Network News and Texas Farmers Life Insurance. They have been airing it 3 times a day for the last week over 210 radio stations. If you IM me with your email, I'll send you a copy of it and a link to a National Public Radio Interview I had.

Best,

Sean