#1
I'll try and keep it short.

Basically, the guitarist/vocalist in my band just quit the band. He was a little older than us and wanted to be more challenged, I respect that. It's cool but other than him it was just me and the drummer (who in all honesty isn't that great) and he was the main force of the band if you get me so I quit too for various reasons... well it took nearly an hour and a half to get to band practice and the same back which was getting really difficult and tiring. Secondly, I no longer get a buzz from playing metal music and i'd been debating with myself over whether I should quit for a while since I greatly prefer playing ska nowadays and it's something I feel passionate for musically. Thirdly because the band doesn't stand much chance without the frontman.

So i'm out but i'm really a bit stuck. I wasn't in the band for that long (8-9 months or something) but I racked up tons of experience and made some killer friends. I just don't know what to do now though and was hoping some of you could give me some ideas of what I should look to do. I'd like to start a ska band but it seems like no one's interested in that anymore and the scene across the world is essentially dead not to mention that the number of musicians needed is generally greater. Then again i'm a huge metalhead and maybe a different metal band might be different and might bring back the buzz.

I just don't want to be left back at square one again like I am now...
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

Quote by the_white_bunny
all hail king of the penis sucking(i said balls. you said dick for some reason?) Isabiggles
#2
Not much to say.Nobody really listens to ska though..nobody I know listens to ska.You could start your own band and mix metal with ska elements.That would rule..or it would be horrible,depends.Seriously now,just look around the music scene for bands that need bass players(I assume you're the bass player because that's what you implied) and check them out.Even if they are more on the rock side of things,give it a look and listen.And make sure to work with musicians as good or better than you.
If you could reason with religious people,there would be no religious people.
#3
Metal with ska would be pretty dire to be honest.

I'm a bassist and a guitarist, i've put an ad up on joinmyband but i'm still thinking about what to do and what would be best for me. Last time I kind of dove straight into the band just because they were the first one I could really find. This time I want to be more cautious..
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

Quote by the_white_bunny
all hail king of the penis sucking(i said balls. you said dick for some reason?) Isabiggles
#4
If nobody plays ska in your area, this could be identified as a market niche. If you would like to listen to ska, you can bet that you're not the only one. So a decent ska band would attract people to come see.

Just because there's heaps of metal bands does not mean that everyone listens to metal, it just means that there's lots of metal bands. This means that to become a successful metal band it's far more of a competitive market to get noticed.

So my advice is, make the band you want, see how it goes. If it's in a market niche (such as ska or Axeman's new Green Day tribute band - the only Green Day tribute band in Canada) it should be easier to get noticed than just another metal band.

Off the side a little, I don't think that the singer's "real" reason for quitting was "not being challenged enough". That's an odd reason, and doesn't really make sense.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Quote by isabiggles
I'd like to start a ska band but it seems like no one's interested in that anymore and the scene across the world is essentially dead


The rest is fair enough but this made me rage. Read my 2 posts in the "Success" thread for more details but basically, create the scene yourself, make people interested in the music!
If every band who didn't have a scene to instantly cling to just gave up, a lot of my favourite bands would not exist.

If you want to play the music, write good songs, which will attract good musicians, and just play it, regardless of whether it's fashionable or whether or not you have a scene to fit in with.
#6
Basically you are asking how to start a band. You've been in a band and so have some experience to offer but now there is no band.

Your question gives you part of the answer. You say the band has given you loads of friends; presumably most of them are interested in music. They either listen to bands or are musicians themselves. Time to start networking!

The next tip is to stop thinking in terms of 'metal' 'ska' etc. music knows no boundaries and neither should you. Just play. Any sort of music is better than not playing especially as a bassist. You'll learn loads of new rhythms and patterns and be able to use them in your other bands as you mature as a musician. If the word goes round that you are up for anything then you will get more offers.

The next thing is that being in a band is often just as much about friendship as music unless you are already an established musician and most bands coalesce around a couple of guys(or gals) who jam together and who stick together. If you are ready to start your own band then you need to start jamming regularly to find someone it all works out with. Do some acoustic stuff at jam nights when you have something prepared and get talking with the other musicians there.

Good luck
#7
Quote by AlanHB

Off the side a little, I don't think that the singer's "real" reason for quitting was "not being challenged enough". That's an odd reason, and doesn't really make sense.


Well he's 18 (nearly 19) and me and the drummer are both 16 and I guess he just feels that he needs to be in a band with people his age with his aspirations. Perhaps challenging wasn't what he meant since the stuff we played was really technical. He wants to be a full time musician and just said that he couldn't see himself being in this band as a full time thing.

I get what you guys (all you guys ^) are saying. I just really don't want to end up in the same position that i'm in now. I kind of felt that I went headfirst into the band and didn't spend enough time looking (even though I did spend loads...).

Ideally i'm looking for a guitarist/singer who I can just jam and write with at an informal level and then create rhythm sections for that person. I'm not a lead guy at all. I'm not a great songwriter but I know I can make great bass lines and that's what i'd like to do. I do know a drummer who could potentially do it. We were in a jam band a while back before we (we were really immature) started arguing and being dicks. He's really good, very tight and a really cool guy but my only worry would be that he wouldn't be able to practise regularly because we both (he goes to my college/school) get bombarded with work.
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

Quote by the_white_bunny
all hail king of the penis sucking(i said balls. you said dick for some reason?) Isabiggles
#8
Quote by isabiggles
Well he's 18 (nearly 19) and me and the drummer are both 16 and I guess he just feels that he needs to be in a band with people his age with his aspirations. Perhaps challenging wasn't what he meant since the stuff we played was really technical. He wants to be a full time musician and just said that he couldn't see himself being in this band as a full time thing.

'
Oh I can see where he's coming from now. That's really his fault - he shouldn't have taken the job in the first place. Personally I wouldn't bother either, the pure logistics of dealing with minors can result in problems with transport and dealing with pubs who don't want minors playing in their venues.

Quote by isabiggles
I get what you guys (all you guys ^) are saying. I just really don't want to end up in the same position that i'm in now. I kind of felt that I went headfirst into the band and didn't spend enough time looking (even though I did spend loads...).


I think you'll always come back to this "same position" unless you get a good band with a decent following. Even then, bands don't last forever, and you'll be cruising onto the next one. It rare for the average band to have a lengthy life span, and when one ends, you just cruise onto the next. There's always downtime if you just stay in one band.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
Quote by AlanHB
'
Oh I can see where he's coming from now. That's really his fault - he shouldn't have taken the job in the first place. Personally I wouldn't bother either, the pure logistics of dealing with minors can result in problems with transport and dealing with pubs who don't want minors playing in their venues.


Well thing is that he joined the band when he 17 with people who were 15 and 16 so that probably felt ok for him. I guess a lot changes when you make the change from a minor to an adult and realise that you really ought to be playing with adults instead of kids. Also, transport isn't really a problem around London what with the london underground, buses and overground trains. It took me like an hour and a half to get to band practice and the same back lol. I don't think pubs actually care about minors playing in their venues either (least not what i've noticed). I can't blame him though, he's looking to become a full-time musician and well i'm at college so can't have the same level of commitment/aspiration as him - plus, who wants to play with kids anyway?

EDIT:

I have a really good drummer now who wants to play in a band with me so things are already looking up.
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

Quote by the_white_bunny
all hail king of the penis sucking(i said balls. you said dick for some reason?) Isabiggles
Last edited by isabiggles at Sep 14, 2010,