#1
Hello,

In your own opinions which of the two guitars will play almost anything and not just one type of music? I'll be getting one of these guitars in about 3 months.. Obviously I'm going to try each of them out soon but what do you guys think?

Thanks.
#2
Wow, that's a really hard question. I got a strat and a tele and I must say they are both very versatile. Both very well set to go from the funk to the metal. Both have beautiful fender cleans and lovable singe coil distortion.

I must say, try both. Pick the one that plays and/or feels better. They do have a different character in sound and feel.
#4
well, my friend plays a tele in his country band, and one of slipknots guitarist plays one.
thats versatility.
and i use a strat to cover slipknot, and a friend played oldschool blues and some soft rock on his.
also versatile.

/rant.
imho, fender is a synonm for versatility. but, like guusw said, play em both at a guitar shop before you buy!
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#5
Quote by wackamasta
well, my friend plays a tele in his country band, and one of slipknots guitarist plays one.
thats versatility.
and i use a strat to cover slipknot, and a friend played oldschool blues and some soft rock on his.
also versatile.

/rant.
imho, fender is a synonm for versatility. but, like guusw said, play em both at a guitar shop before you buy!


John 5 is a tele man aswell,which sounds good with his metal bluegrass or whatever he plays,lol.
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#6
Quote by wackamasta
and one of slipknots guitarist plays one.

His are also custom, with mahogany bodies and EMG 81/60 pickups. Not quite the same tele.

I think the Strat slightly wins out in versatility, especially an HSS. I mean, name a genre, either can do it, but if you ask me, an HSS Strat could probably do a few better than the Tele.

If you're going to be playing nearly everything, get an HSS or SSS Stratocaster, but the Tele is by no means a bad choice.
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#7
Quote by wackamasta
well, my friend plays a tele in his country band, and one of slipknots guitarist plays one.


I think you're talking about two completely different guitars here. The one they use in slipknot has two emg humbuckers instead of two single coils.
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#8
id prefer a strat. Only because of the bodystyle and the HSS option. My strat can play almost anything under the sun with the trem floating. sure its not total dragonforce whammy material, but hardly anyone wants to break 100's of high e strings in a year by trying to hold the guitar up by the trem arm alone.
Ive played teles before and they are just as good. its up to you to make this dreaded decision, but personally, id go for the hss strat.
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#9
SSS Stratocaster would be my personal opinion. Ridiculously versatile, but I still keep another guitar handy for heavy metal and shred, although the Strat gets some action for Neo-Classical stuff too. Mostly though, I use it for blues and Pink Floyd-ish stuff. Pretty damn versatile, especially through a well EQed amp.Teles... Just not as good in my eyes. Kickass guitars, I love them, but just not as versatile as a strat.
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#10
H-S-H strats,
aka superstrats are as versatile you can get.
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#11
Quote by guusw
Wow, that's a really hard question. I got a strat and a tele and I must say they are both very versatile.


+1

i'd say it depends on the stuff you play- everyone's definition of versatile will be slightly (or even a lot) different.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#12
I can agree, REALLY tough question.
They're both incredibly versatile, I would say it more depends on the overall base tone that you're looking for
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#13
Quote by Dave_Mc
+1

i'd say it depends on the stuff you play- everyone's definition of versatile will be slightly (or even a lot) different.

this - it seems like on UG most people define versatility as "how many pickup switching options the guitar has" yet my definition of a versatile guitar is one which can naturally fit into a lot of different styles without the aid of coil taps and phase inverting and things - my fender tele has all these fancy wiring options and i think they contribute absolutely nothing towards the versatility of the guitar. with passive circuits which most guitars have, you can only take things away from the sound.

basically i'd say that the strat and the tele are equally versatile - though they have quite different tonal properties the tones they produce will do more or less the same job. that's the only thing i can say on the matter without being somewhat biased towards telecasters as a result of personal preference
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#14
The correct answer to this thread is: Whichever one you like the most.
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#15
I personally own both. My tele is a MIM and my strat is a MIA. The most obvious difference between the two, other than the body shape and the pick up configuration, is the neck. My strat just sparkles and shines whereas my tele is a bit more bland. I might contribute this to the difference in materials used on the MIM vs. the MIA. Beyond that, I can say that my telecaster gets more use. It stays on a stand whereas my stratocaster is normally in the case. Therefore, for no reason other than proxmitity the telecsater becomes the first guitar I reach for. I enjoy playing them both and find them tohave more in common that most people want to admit. I really like having both and find them both to be very versitle guitars, but that being said, when I do home recordings I like to do my rhythm work with my telecaster and my lead work on my stratocaster. There is a weight difference, but I think they are both great guitars.

Go for the telecaster if you have to choose, simply because there are less telecasters out there.
#16
Quote by Blompcube
(a) this - it seems like on UG most people define versatility as "how many pickup switching options the guitar has" yet my definition of a versatile guitar is one which can naturally fit into a lot of different styles without the aid of coil taps and phase inverting and things - my fender tele has all these fancy wiring options and i think they contribute absolutely nothing towards the versatility of the guitar. with passive circuits which most guitars have, you can only take things away from the sound.

(b) basically i'd say that the strat and the tele are equally versatile - though they have quite different tonal properties the tones they produce will do more or less the same job.


(a) oh, i like having lots of options and multiple pickups, but i'd agree that sometimes you can get lost, and also not every extra feature improves the versatility.

To me, it's a bit like "tone"- there are two different types of tone, in my opinion, finger tone and gear tone. Same with versatility- can a guitar be used for various different genres? If so, that's one type of versatility. Can a guitar work for several different sounds, i.e. sound a bit like a strat one minute, do an approximation of tele the next, and then do a vaguely gibson-esque tone? That's a different type of versatility. The strat or tele certainly qualify for the former (indeed, pass with flying colours), but, to my ears, anyway, they fail the latter. Or at least don't pass anywhere near as convincingly. Something like an HSS or HSH superstrat, or a humbucker guitar with coil splits, work very well for the latter, even if a lot of the tones aren't 100% authentic- they might be close enough, depending on the context.

(b) yep, exactly. I can use my tele for everything I can use my strat for, and vice-versa, but the tele will always sound like a tele and the strat will always sound like a strat. I wouldn't want to use either for hard rock/heavy metal, but for everything up to and including classic rock, they'll work. The way I phrase it, you can use, say, a tele for classic rock, but it's going to sound like you're playing classic rock with a tele. That's great if a tele tone is what you need, not so great if it's not.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Sep 13, 2010,
#17
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#18
To give a simple response, for hardware, the strat has more versatility since it has 3 pickups in most cases.

But this depends on what you're playing with the guitar in the first place. Both guitars can cover the same styles and types of music, like the strat often chosen for blues and tele chosen for punk and country pickers. You know the difference between single coils and humbuckers, and I know I've seen them played through Mesas and Peaveys for metal.
#19
Thanks for the different opinions and replies, I suppose the main genre of music I'll end up playing is blues, although I will be learning rock and metal tunes.
#20
for metal too, i'd personally be getting something with a bridge humbucker as well... i wouldn't really want to use a stock SSS or SS strat or tele for metal at all.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#21
I have both a Strat and a Tele, and like others have mentioned, they're both extremely versatile.

That said, I don't really ever play my Strat, whereas my Tele gets played all of the time. Telecasters just feel better to me...but that's just personal preference.

I would suggest trying them both out, and see which one feels better in your hands.
#22
Quote by Dave_Mc
for metal too, i'd personally be getting something with a bridge humbucker as well... i wouldn't really want to use a stock SSS or SS strat or tele for metal at all.
GrittyBlues obviously needs a Fender and an LP-style to cover most stuff.

#23
hehe, that's your solution to everything, "you don't need one guitar, you need two!"
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#24
Whichever one you like, and depends on what pickups you have on them. I kinda like teles because of the fixed bridge, but strats can have full sized humbuckers in the bridge.
#25
I'd say go with a strat. They edge it on variation.

If you're new to playing guitar, it's hard to know exactly what you want to play/where you want to go with your playing/what type of guitar you should have.

The Fender Strat is a pretty solid bet though. The reason I would say go for that over the Tele is that I think you can get darker tones with the strat and so is a good multi-genral (yes I made that word up) guitar.

There's really not that much in it though.

Chances are in less than 5 years you will change/buy another guitar and then you can start being more particular with what you're buying the guitar for (as in particular types). What I would say though is that for classic rock / blues / indie / alternative / possibly even hard rock, a Strat would be a decent purchase and considered as such by buyer.

The summary, Strats are good jack-of-all trades guitar and even if your tastes change a little, it'll still serve you well. If after a few years you want to buy another guitar then you could think about getting something with humbuckers and have even more variety in your arsenal (rather than trying to fit it all into one guitar). It's more fun that way as you have more toys, and well GAS is sometimes uncontrollable.
#26
If I can make a suggestion, I'd take a look at the Deluxe MIM Nashville Telecaster. I own one and love it I got it at the time when I was torn between a Strat and a Tele, unsure of which I wanted. It's got two Tex-Mex Tele pickups which give you great tones, and an added Strat middle pickup which allows you to get those Strat tones (Neck/Middle, Middle/Bridge). I've found this guitar to be extremely versatile at a great price. My suggestion.
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#27
If you're comparing a standard Tele and a standard Strat, it's pretty obvious that the Strat is the more versatile instrument. Methinks there's a few people in this thread that need to look up the word versatile. It doesn't mean better. In this case, it just means you can get more, different sounds with it. The Strat has five pickup positions and a tremolo bridge. The Tele, 3 and a fixed bridge. If you care to read up, you'll find that Leo designed the Strat after getting recommendations on features from Tele players looking for a more versatile and comfortable instrument.
#28
Sheesh, people are playing through a bank of pedals, hooked to modeling amps, and they wonder whether their guitar is versatile enough? Not to mention the variety of effects possible using different techniques, strings, loopers, and all whatnot. Multiply by 10 (or more) when you go into a recording studio. And even with this arsenal of signal modification, most name guitarists have found a sound they like and they stick with it and can even be identified by it. They don't want versatile, they want "signature".

So this is kind of a silly debate. You can find people playing nearly every kind of music, using nearly every kind of guitar for each.
#29
well a lot that has been said is very good but also don't forget your amp plays a huge part in your sound, a crappy guitar through a good amp will more times than not sound better than vice versa.
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#30
Quote by speakerjones
If you're comparing a standard Tele and a standard Strat, it's pretty obvious that the Strat is the more versatile instrument. Methinks there's a few people in this thread that need to look up the word versatile. It doesn't mean better. In this case, it just means you can get more, different sounds with it. The Strat has five pickup positions and a tremolo bridge. The Tele, 3 and a fixed bridge. If you care to read up, you'll find that Leo designed the Strat after getting recommendations on features from Tele players looking for a more versatile and comfortable instrument.


yeah but those pickup positions sound different. Positions 2 + 4 on a strat sound pretty similar- not identical, but you could make do with either if you had to, and (ime anyway) you pretty much use them for the same type of tone. And the tele bridge pickup, with its tone control, can cover most of the tones that the strat bridge pickup and middle pickup can cover.

also, perhaps more importantly regarding the main thrust of your argument, when the strat was originally designed it had a 3-way pickup selector.

Methinks there's a few people in this thread who might want to actually look into the history of fender.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?