#1
I'm pretty good at lead guitar. Hell, I'm really damn good. I can play just about any "difficult" Jon Petrucci-esque song you want. The problem is, I can't strum for shit. I'm having trouble with getting the rhythm down.... I was just wondering if anyone had any good tips on getting better at it. Are there any songs that are good for that kind of playing?

Thanks
Quote by pielover375
So last year, I put some potatoes in this jar and forgot about them. Today, I found them, and when I opened the jar, there is a puddle at the bottom and it smells like alcohol. If I drink this, do you think I will die, or have I made potato vodka?
#3
Try it on an acoustic guitar first. That way it really magnifies any flaws in your strumming so it's easier to figure out what's going on. Also there's more resistance.
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#4
keep counting in your head 1-2-3-4....keep that rhythm inside your head, then once you have a good feel to it..start adding variations

1-2-and-3-and-4-and...

it's hard to teach, but easier to just learn through playing...but keep the rhythm in the back of your head...that's a must, good luck!
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#5
Quote by tjbhdeath squad
keep counting in your head 1-2-3-4....keep that rhythm inside your head, then once you have a good feel to it..start adding variations

1-2-and-3-and-4-and...

it's hard to teach, but easier to just learn through playing...but keep the rhythm in the back of your head...that's a must, good luck!


Basically this, but a metronome might help a little more
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#6
Play with a metronome. and make up a striking pattern, start simple like: one, two, three, four.

Later once you get that down go to the next one: one and, two and, three and, four and.

These are very simple rhythms, now combine them into some thing like: one, two and, three and, four.

then add some rests: one and, rest, three and, rest... or make eighth note rests: one and, rest and, three rest, four.

first try these patterns with muted chords, then change to a simple chord progression like G maj, D maj, C maj, G maj. Make sure, for simplicities sake (since you're learning), that each chord gets a full measure. Yeah it doesn't really make for a complex song, but it will help alot when it comes to learning strumming patterns.

Also choose to learn popy-er songs, metal and progressive rock tend to use more complicated striking patterns. Some good songs for strumming are:
Plush - Stone Temple Pilots
Free Fallin' - Tom Petty
Faith - George Michael
Wonderwall - Oasis
Touch Peel Stand - Days of the New
Outside - Staind

These are just a few songs with very heavy rhythm and little or no lead, making it much easier to just focus on the strumming. the only other note that I have is to definately do this on an acoustic guitar. It will help strengthen your chord fingering and also help you hear the imperfections a little better.
#7
:\ I don't own any acoustic guitars.. the only guitars I have are an Ibanez Xiphos and a Player's Deluxe Strat. The strat works pretty well for clean playing, though. I don't have the money to get myself one either.

Thanks for the advice, though; especially the songs, it's really helping
Quote by pielover375
So last year, I put some potatoes in this jar and forgot about them. Today, I found them, and when I opened the jar, there is a puddle at the bottom and it smells like alcohol. If I drink this, do you think I will die, or have I made potato vodka?
#8
Practice I-IV-V Progression with Open Chords. Play around and improvise on and around those chords.