#1
Just a quick question about writing parts for dual guitar, how often do the two guitarists actually play the same thing together? Not harmonized, but literally the same thing. I can hear clearly when there is a rhythm strumming chords and a lead soloing over the top or two guitars playing similar melodies in harmony but sometimes you just hear the one riff going in the meat of a song. Do they play the same thing together or is one just not playing anything?
#2
they play the same thing, it is very rare for one guitarist to not play anything at all.

EDIT: unless of course one of the guitarists is singing, than they might not always play, but I meant more like two guitarists that just play guitar
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Sep 13, 2010,
#4
In studio versions, most likely it's just one guitar playing. In live versions, depending on whether the second guitarist is an attention ***** or not, he may either be playing the same thing or waiting for his part. Or they might want the sound of two guitars playing together and use that. I assume you're talking about listening to a song on your computer or ipod, so probably just one guitar.
la de da.
#5
they play the same thing unless one of the guitarist is also singing then the the other might stop playing to sing
#6
Quote by zgbgydug
In studio versions, most likely it's just one guitar playing


not necessarily, many bands double track the guitar parts in the studio, even bands with one guitarist.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
Quote by theogonia777
not necessarily, many bands double track the guitar parts in the studio, even bands with one guitarist.

And live, they tend to use an effect to fatten their guitarist's tone. A damn good idea, imho. In fact, that's exactly what Randy Rhoads did. They'd actually triple track his parts; then live, he used a small dose of reverb to get the same fattening of tone.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 13, 2010,
#8
In studios, it's quite common to layer.

Live or in writing.. cant really see what the use of doing the same thing twice would be, except if the sounds of the guitars were very different.

But yeah, it's like when people are just replying using 'me too' posts.. doesn't add anything, just repeats

Years back, I once saw a band doing the supporting act for some well known deathmetal band whoms name I forgot..

They didnt have a base player, and the two guitarists had the exact same guitars, playing the exact same notes through the exact same amps using the exact same settings.
Suffice to say, it was pretty stupid.
#9
They both play the same thing.
Look at Iron Maiden for example. 3 guitarists, of course they are playing the same thing during rhythm. It's not that hard to match up. I'm sure that at some point you played along to some songs you like - you matched what the guy on the other guitar on the record was doing? Well that's how it works
#10
Two guitarists playing the same melody always sounds great.
Use it to make a part of the song stand out. Like the main melody, riff..
#12
Listen to some good 'ol Guns n Roses. Slash and Izzy are playing the same concept, but they never really play identical parts. In my opinion they were the best rhythm/lead combo.
#13
^Nice. Guns N Roses are the example I was going to use. The way their guitar parts interact is beautiful. There are times where the parts they play are close enough to being the same thing that it is in effect two guitars playing the same part but rarely, the particular example I'm thinking of is the intro riff in Mr Brownstone one bar is almost identical and then the next bar each will play a different variation of the same idea, then the next bar they play almost the same thing followed by another bar where they different versions of the same thing. (In the verses of that song they sometimes play pretty much identical lines too.)

But yeah sometimes two guitars playing the same thing is great it gives a chorus kind of effect. It's like when John Lennon sang three different parts and each part was sung three times so the effect is like 9 John Lennon's singing to us (in the song - Because).
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 15, 2010,