#1
well. now i know what is major scales minor scales, and slowly getting the heck of the chords too. I have simple question one by one. pls be kind enuf to answer em

1) Major and minor jus depends on the chord progression and the mood rite?

2)coming to chords, the chords r I IV V of a maj scale make a good progression, ?? so combination of all these chords any wy sound good?

3) and notes of a chord, for instance tak C, I IV VII is alwayz the notes of the chord? that is CEG?

4) So mixing of two scales are done my common notes?

5) G and D Maj notes are the same, so whats the difference bw them? they both can be used for the same chord progression! its jus the root note and its relative minor that changes, wat if u play wid all major chords, G and D both r same! isnt it?

pls number your answers and do spend 2 mins to answe every thing with examples

more coming
#2
and another one, what chords of the relative minor will suit the major? for instance G maj has Em as its relative minor. so wats the formula for chord prog n minor scales ??
#3
Quote by guitar.pick
1) Major and minor jus depends on the chord progression and the mood rite?
Major and minor are qualities of an interval, chord, scale, or key.

I'm not sure what you mean by asking whether it just depends on the chord progression and the mood.

When describing a chord a major triad is one made up of a root note a major third and a perfect fifth, a minor triad would be made up of a root note a minor third and a perfect fifth.

It is very much the same when the terms are used to describe a scale, the term major would describe a scale in which the third is major and the fifth perfect, sometimes it might just mean the third is major. Similarly the minor when describing a scale, means that the third is minor and the fifth is perfect, or sometimes simply that the third is minor.

(Some people use the terms regardless of the quality of the fifth while other's are more specific when the fifth is not perfect.)

In terms of key you have major or minor This is pretty much based on whether the third in that key is naturally major or naturally minor.

Quote by guitar.pick
2)coming to chords, the chords r I IV V of a maj scale make a good progression, ?? so combination of all these chords any wy sound good?
Yes I IV V sound good together. You can always find a way to make what should sound good not and what shouldn't sound good, sound good. It's about using the chords to express your unique voice and artistic vision.

Quote by guitar.pick
3) and notes of a chord, for instance tak C, I IV VII is alwayz the notes of the chord? that is CEG?
What?? The C major chord is made from 1 3 5 the root the major third and the perfect fifth. I IV VII are ways of notating major chords built on the root note I (C Major), the Perfect Fourth IV (F Major), and the Major Seventh VII (B Major). The B Major is not "diatonic" that is it uses notes from outside the C major scale (D♯ and F♯. So no the I IV VII have nothing to do with the notes of the chord.


Quote by guitar.pick
4) So mixing of two scales are done my common notes?


Quote by guitar.pick
5) G and D Maj notes are the same, so whats the difference bw them? they both can be used for the same chord progression! its jus the root note and its relative minor that changes, wat if u play wid all major chords, G and D both r same! isnt it?
No. The key of G Major has a C and the key of D Major has a C♯. G major chord has G B D and a D major chord has D F♯ A. The notes G and D don't sound alike and are not the same. They are harmonious and sound good together but are not the same.

There are many different common progressions in both major and minor. And many different ways of going about creating music. When you ask for a formula there is so much to explain I don't know where to start.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 14, 2010,
#4
Quote by guitar.pick
well. now i know what is major scales minor scales, and slowly getting the heck of the chords too. I have simple question one by one. pls be kind enuf to answer em

1) Major and minor jus depends on the chord progression and the mood rite?

2)coming to chords, the chords r I IV V of a maj scale make a good progression, ?? so combination of all these chords any wy sound good?

3) and notes of a chord, for instance tak C, I IV VII is alwayz the notes of the chord? that is CEG?

4) So mixing of two scales are done my common notes?

5) G and D Maj notes are the same, so whats the difference bw them? they both can be used for the same chord progression! its jus the root note and its relative minor that changes, wat if u play wid all major chords, G and D both r same! isnt it?

pls number your answers and do spend 2 mins to answe every thing with examples

more coming


First of all, good job for digging in. I respect someone thats really trying to take on the big stuff and learn, because its not easy. I've been there.

1. Major and minor depend upon the resolution of the chord. Its safe to say that Major has a happy tonality and minor has a sadder tonailty, but these are broad generalizations. Your use of mood is also somewhat sweeping. However the idea youre going for is right. But its how everything resolves - be it on a minor chord or a major chord that it happens to do so on.

2. The answer is yes, but there are other chords as well that make a nice progression when added to those, in a diatonic sense.

3. Notes of a chord are notes, and use of roman numerals indicate the chords themselves in a progression, so those tend to refer to keys. For example I IV V in C are the chords C F and G.

The notes of the chord C are composed of the 1,3 and 5th degrees of the C major scale. Write out the C Major scale C D E F G A B C and notice the 1, 3 and 5t are C, E and G. These are degrees of the scale that make up the C Major chord/triad.

4. Mixing of 2 scales should be done according to the tonal center and where it wants to resolve. So Using Pentantonic minor and Natural minor together, yes, some have shared notes, but its all in how it fits over the underlying chords and where the music wants to finalize on.

5. Many chords are related by just 2 notes. G is G B D and D is D F# and A. They aren't related.

In keys they are - In G, D is the V. In D, G is the IV.

6. I'm not sure about your inclusion of the term relative minor. In what way do you see that relative minor important?

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by guitar.pick
1) Major and minor jus depends on the chord progression and the mood rite?
Major and minor [scales] determine which seven of the twelve notes you can use in a part. The chords you build must have only notes from the scale you choose. (There are two exceptions: modulation and embelishing notes)
2)coming to chords, the chords r I IV V of a maj scale make a good progression, ?? so combination of all these chords any wy sound good?
Chords I, IV and V are the most important chords in any scale key. They help establish the feeling of tension and relaxation in your song.

You can go from I to IV and back and from I to V and back. You can go from IV to V but not from V to IV.

Each of these combinations have a number of rules. If you break them, your music will sound so-so. Lots of listeners don't hear all of these problems, so most rock and pop songwriters get away with loads of mistakes. But some listeners do hear these and know when they deal with an able songwriter or a wannabe nitwit.

While I, IV and V are the most important chords, using only these will produce boring music. By adding special versions of these chords (inversions, sevenths, ...) and adding secondary chords, AND still applying all the rules, your music will be much more interesting.
3) and notes of a chord, for instance tak C, I IV VII is alwayz the notes of the chord? that is CEG?
Wh... how... what? Please re-read your questions. You are confusing at times.

In the key of C major, I = CEG, IV = FAC, V = GBD (and VII = BDF).
4) So mixing of two scales are done my common notes?
Almost. To chain parts in different keys together, you can try to find chords containing the same notes, so that the parts overlap. For instance, coming from C major, chord VI is the same as chord I in A minor (= ACE). You can trick a listener into hearing a new key after this pivot chord by continuing with other A minor chords.

It's not the only way to switch keys though. Switching keys is called modulation.
5) G and D Maj notes are the same, so whats the difference bw them? they both can be used for the same chord progression! its jus the root note and its relative minor that changes, wat if u play wid all major chords, G and D both r same! isnt it?
20Tigers did a good job explaining that one.
and another one, what chords of the relative minor will suit the major? for instance G maj has Em as its relative minor. so wats the formula for chord prog n minor scales
If I understand your question correctly, then this should be answered in point 4. Find the 7 notes from both keys. Build all the chords and work out the ones they have in common.

Now I need a break and I'm running out of ink
Last edited by Withakay at Sep 15, 2010,