#1
hey guys, ive been a electric bassist for 7 years and double bassist for 5 now. long story short, i always have these great riff ideas in my head and i wish i could record them so i can hear how they actually sound and tweak and work on them. so i need help buying a product

So im looking for something that can:
-record songs straight onto my computer
-can have variety of built in effects (pedals) in the program (like garage band, but i have a microsoft computer)
-has a drum machine (this is a must)
-can write music on and has the computer play it (kinda like guitar pro when you press the play button)
-can record through a mic or a direct chord input (so i can plug my guitar in, or play trumpet into the mic)

these are all the things i need. if there are any of these things i can get for free, please tell me because i am a bit tight on cash saving for school. i dont care for prestine sound quality, but i want it to be fairly clean and still nice to listen too.

thanks for your help guys, im new to all this so all help with be appreciated very much.
#2
i can think of a few programs that together could do this but i cant think of any that do it all.
For the guitar pro like software id get tux guitar just because its a freeware that doesnt suck. i dont have recording system with a drum machine but you should definately get a condenser mic since they sound better when recording and use a blue icicle for the phantom power

Edit: if your wondering I have Reaper for recording and if i need a drum track ill write something in tuxguitar and then record it with the mic. it sounds just as good as a drum track but you can add more pizzazz and more complicated riffs on the drums. (yea i said pizzazz)
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Man, thank God the russians created UG. Otherwise, how would I have gotten this information?
Last edited by 100% at Sep 14, 2010,
#3
Quote by 100%
i can think of a few programs that together could do this but i cant think of any that do it all.
For the guitar pro like software id get tux guitar just because its a freeware that doesnt suck. i dont have recording system with a drum machine but you should definately get a condenser mic since they sound better when recording and use a blue icicle for the phantom power


alright man, i know no matter what i will be getting a mic

but i have also been looking at these line 6 things that you plug into your computer. yet i find its hard to find info on these things. i see that they have a wide selection of preamps and you can record on them, but can you mix tracks AND once again, does it have a drum machine and the guitar pro like 'electronic' playing?

should i just get a drum machine seprate?
#4
Quote by bassbrotha
alright man, i know no matter what i will be getting a mic

but i have also been looking at these line 6 things that you plug into your computer. yet i find its hard to find info on these things. i see that they have a wide selection of preamps and you can record on them, but can you mix tracks AND once again, does it have a drum machine and the guitar pro like 'electronic' playing?

should i just get a drum machine seprate?

the line 6 basically runs the signal into your computer and puts whatever FX on it you select, from what i understand you still need a program to record into (like protools, cubase, reason or my personal favorite, acid) as for the drum machine there are lots of drum vst's out there that sound good. most DAW's (like protools, cubase etc) have dinky midi kits built into them (actually i think they just use the microsoft midi mapper versions but dont quote me on this) and technically function, though they sound pretty terrible. the thing is, the more you can spend, the better its going to sound. unfortunately thats the way the world of recording works.
#5
Quote by z4twenny
the line 6 basically runs the signal into your computer and puts whatever FX on it you select, from what i understand you still need a program to record into (like protools, cubase, reason or my personal favorite, acid) as for the drum machine there are lots of drum vst's out there that sound good. most DAW's (like protools, cubase etc) have dinky midi kits built into them (actually i think they just use the microsoft midi mapper versions but dont quote me on this) and technically function, though they sound pretty terrible. the thing is, the more you can spend, the better its going to sound. unfortunately thats the way the world of recording works.


alright, i understand where you are getting at. i think ill download one of those programs to record first, and just go from there. if i want a better drum machine, ill explore that, and if i want effects, ill look at those line 6 things. no point in buying things i dont need right away

by the way, you were a big help. thank you very much


and last question, rather than paying for a program, would audicy work just fine? i know it wont have the shit drum machine, but i could live without it if the program works fine for free.
#6
audacity is fine, however, get the free trial of reaper. It says you have to pay after 30 days but you can just keep hitting still evaluating as much as you want
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Man, thank God the russians created UG. Otherwise, how would I have gotten this information?
#7
I use Cubase and the drum sounds I get in Cubase are *quite* convincing. The "full" version of Cubase comes with a version of the Halion soft-sampler player, and since I started using it, I haven't used my other drum software once.

In fact, I can get better drum sounds using samples in Cubase than I can by miking up a real kit. After this weekend is over (band finishing up some final recording bits), I'll be able to post proof.

CT

(we used real mics to record, but I really wasn't happy with what I was getting. I did some sample replacing and replaced the kick and the snare and a lot of the toms. I kept the overheads to add some more "realness" to the mix with the cymbals and all.)
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
^ lulz i did the exact same thing the last couple of days for a friend of mine. he used drumagog to replace the kick and snare.

ive never personally used cubase and the only drums i would REALLY personally vouch for would be steven slate drums. but mainly because they come pretweaked so that you dont have to do anything to get an awesome final mix sound. that being said they're only really good for rock/metal/alt rock type stuff, if i wanted a jazzy sound i think the "crappiness" of ezdrummer would sound good. ive used several of the vst drum kits and i've found that different ones are better for different sounds.

ive heard audacity is really good, i'd recommend that over reaper from what i've read etc.
Last edited by z4twenny at Sep 18, 2010,