#1
Hello fellow guitarists

Ive been playing about a year and a half now and until now ive been learning songs from tabs and not alot else,

Im looking to take my playing to the next level and become "decent" at both lead and rhythm playing.

What sort of things should i be doing? and can you please try and tell me how to practice CORRECTLY becuase im abit of a technique freak, i'd rather play a peice with good technique than play is super quick.

Any exercises or drills you can give me would be great as well as tips
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#2
I'd advise you to start improvising and writing your own music rather than playing other peoples material all the time. Learn some theory.

A competent guitarist is not a record player.
#3
Quote by piszczel
I'd advise you to start improvising and writing your own music rather than playing other peoples material all the time. Learn some theory.

A competent guitarist is not a record player.

this.

ive had musicians say im a shit musician because "i dont play it EXACTLY like the record". where's creativity in copying everything note for note?
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#4
Quote by piszczel
I'd advise you to start improvising and writing your own music rather than playing other peoples material all the time. Learn some theory.

A competent guitarist is not a record player.


Absolutely.
Transcend the boundary between being a guitarist and a musician. Learn the mechanics of music (theory) and you will find ways to apply it to your playing. You might find it boring at first, but the ability to listen to something and then analyze it will help you immensely when you are in an unfamiliar situation musically.
#5
Quote by Banjocal
this.

ive had musicians say im a shit musician because "i dont play it EXACTLY like the record". where's creativity in copying everything note for note?



u know u totally left yourself open for some crazy trolling. im not gana troll, im just saying.
#6
Every post so far = win. I can't agree more with what the last few guys just said. Improvising and learning music theory will open so many doors for you, and pretty soon making up a new riff, melody etc. will come naturally.
Quote by Kensai
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#7
Agreed with the rest, but beyond the knowledgeable aspects of it all, get your actual body in line with what your mind is learning. Get your rhythm mechanics up to speed, and train your ear a bit because once you know what notes will "work" over a chord progression, a good ear will let you know what notes work best. Also, don't play just one style or genre.
#8
Define competent...

If me of 10 years ago had met the me of today, the past me would think the present me was an amazing guitarist.

But the present me knows how crappy I really am, but I digress...

I think the first real step is to remove the dichotomy between 'lead' and 'rhythm' playing. No offense, but when I comb the craigslist ads and I see someone say they can play both lead and rhythm, I automatically think - he probably sucks or is very one dimensional (ie can only play metal and hard rock).

Voice lead your chords and learn to play the solos around the chords of the song as some of the others said.
Last edited by jogogonne at Sep 14, 2010,
#9
Quote by rocker222
u know u totally left yourself open for some crazy trolling. im not gana troll, im just saying.


You know, you totally left yourself open for some crazy trolling. I'm not going to troll, I'm just saying.

Fixed.

And how? Because I don't want to learn a lick note for note? I'm a musician, not a record player. I want to develop my own style, and develop it based on my influences of my favourite guitarists.

I DON'T want to take a SRV lick note for note and play it instead of changing it or writing my own lick in the style of it.

If you aren't aware of the concept, I am a guitatist who likes to make music personal to me, and is creative. there are a lot of guitarists like this. Ya know, sucessful ones (although I'm not because I don't play publicly much).
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#10
100% agree with the other guitarists here. I recently started trying to come up with cool chord progressions and adding in lead lines, and it's the most fun I've had playing thus far. Once you know your scales, can improvise somewhat reliably, and you know what sounds good with your chord progressions, you can literally just compose badass songs on the spot. It makes you feel like you're putting on a concert instead of practicing, which is infinitely more fun. Not only that, but when someone asks you to play you can do something memorable, that they haven't heard before and is very impressive-looking, rather than a piece of someone else's song.

I recommend starting with a nice easy progression. I personally really like G-D-C (I usually play it similar to the chorus riff from The Grateful Dead song Sugar Magnolia as it sets up a great feel for soloing but obviously play around with it and see what you can come up with). Try mixing up how you play the chords -- louder or softer, hitting different strings, different strumming patterns, etc. Then try picking out notes JUST from the chords with your hand still in position. Slowly work toward laying down a good rhythm, then switching to lead, and transitioning back into chords. As I said, once you get your foundations down, you can make it sound like you spent hours composing and practicing a song on the spot. Then you can come up with more complicated progressions, etc., and you'll be opening new doors every time you practice. Have fun man!
Last edited by pbskl at Sep 15, 2010,
#11
Haha totally agree with that - we're guitarists NOT "record players". A jet lyric said "a pill popping juke box is all you are" - aimed at DJ's BUT if a guitarist is just playing what they hear they are just a "guitar player" and not a musician at all. Improv is way more fun, satisfying and will make your playing come on leaps and bounds. I;ve been recommending this courseto people, you should check it out.
#12
Quote by Banjocal
You know, you totally left yourself open for some crazy trolling. I'm not going to troll, I'm just saying.

Fixed.

And how? Because I don't want to learn a lick note for note? I'm a musician, not a record player. I want to develop my own style, and develop it based on my influences of my favourite guitarists.

I DON'T want to take a SRV lick note for note and play it instead of changing it or writing my own lick in the style of it.

If you aren't aware of the concept, I am a guitatist who likes to make music personal to me, and is creative. there are a lot of guitarists like this. Ya know, sucessful ones (although I'm not because I don't play publicly much).



idk maybe u dont play your cover like the original, because you cant play the song? you dont play publicly cause you suck? yea i could troll on and on. but im not gana do that cause im a nice person. once you learn the song note for note, then you can go around making your own changes to it. you want people to recognize it to the point where they say, thats blaw blaw blaw by bla bla. not where people go what the hell is he playing thats not the song.
Last edited by rocker222 at Sep 16, 2010,
#13
Quote by rocker222
idk maybe u dont play your cover like the original, because you cant play the song? you dont play publicly cause you suck? yea i could troll on and on. but im not gana do that cause im a nice person. once you learn the song note for note, then you can go around making your own changes to it. you want people to recognize it to the point where they say, thats blaw blaw blaw by bla bla. not where people go what the hell is he playing thats not the song.


I'm sure a lot of people could troll you on and on about your grammar...

Also

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XYWblUqU0s

This guy is playing the cover not the original way, because he obviously can't.
#14
Quote by Shinami
I'm sure a lot of people could troll you on and on about your grammar...

Also

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XYWblUqU0s

This guy is playing the cover not the original way, because he obviously can't.


lmao I bet he can play the original version to. Eh I don't care about grammar. If I cared at all. I would have used something like Microsoft word, or the grammar correcting tool that is on Chrome, which tells me that lmao is not a word. So eh troll my grammar, I don't care. It's a pathetic attempt to troll me back.
Last edited by rocker222 at Sep 16, 2010,
#15
Ahem . . . to bring this thread back on track from the "non-trolling" . . .

The first thing I would say to you, TS, is that rhythm is absolutely the most important thing any competent guitarist must be able to do. First of all, comes your ability to play in time. If you can't play in time then you can't play lead or rhythm and no one will really want to play with you. No cares about fancy chops or licks if you can't play them on the beat. Second of all, comes your comping ability. Interesting rhythm guitar is appreciated by the entire band, it keeps things moving and interesting, instead of static and repetitive.

Beyond that, your lead playing is still important, but it is something that is built upon your rhythmic abilities. Technique, licks, chops, speed . . . all of that stuff is important, but even more important than that is the ability to pick what to use and when, to the greatest effect to the groove your jamming on. I don't care if you can play 1 million notes per second with precise technique if it all sounds like auditory diarrhea over the groove.

Now, in terms of learning other songs, I don't think that there is anything wrong with learning a song exactly the way it is played on the record. I think that can help with learning different techniques, chord progressions, melodies and ideas on the guitar. It is important to be able to internalize the song you learn and make it your own, but I am a big proponent of the Charlie Parker principle:

Quote by Charlie Parker
You've got to learn your instrument. Then, you practice, practice, practice. And then, when you finally get up there on the bandstand, forget all that and just wail.


To me, that essentially means that you've got to learn the rules of your instrument, but when it comes time to fucking jam, you forget all of those things, break all of the rules and you fucking jam. You can learn a lot from learning other people's music, and there is nothing wrong with that. But the best part comes out once you internalize those licks and chord progressions and ideas and you make them your own.
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