#1
I was playing bass on Beatles Rock Band and I noticed that Paul has a lot of really groovy basslines, which lead me to learn a few tunes and made me realize that not all of them are that easy to play. Even on the recording, his rhythm is dead on tight ... before the days of ProTools and quantizing. I thought that might have been just for the new remastered version but listening to my dad's old records from 40 years ago and his performance is just as tight on them.

So how come when people talk about amazing bassists there's almost never a mention of Sir Paul?
#5
Beatles were 50% music, 50% movement, he didn't contribute to the movement.
Been in Japan since August, no fucking money left!
#6
Paul's a tight bassist with a knack for melody and harmony. His input on the Beatle's songs are what took them from 4 chord pop songs to musical works of art that defined the pop music genre for years afterwards.

His talent didn't lie in bass playing it lay in composing and arranging. As a good friend of mine once said "McCartney isn't a bassist, he's a musician."
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#7
Some one on this forum once said that in reference to Paul the old expression "horses for their courses". He was the right bass player for the Beatles. His fame is more for being half of one of the most successful song writing duos in history and a member of a band that went beyond the boundaries of pop fame to cultural icon status.

I'll freely admit, I don't like Paul. Some of his bass lines are fun to play but the ego and the man get into the way. There is a strong cult of personality issue there. Its the same issue I have with Sting.
#8
He is very over-rated.
The Official "Rockin' Roadie"

-Lakland Skyline 44-02
-Fender Marcus Miller Jazz
-Fender MiM Precision
-Fender TC90 Thinline
-Squier Stratocaster w/mods (1989)
-Orange Dual Terror
-Marshall Valvestate 8280
-Marshall VS412
-Various pedals
#9
Quote by anarkee
Some one on this forum once said that in reference to Paul the old expression "horses for their courses". He was the right bass player for the Beatles. His fame is more for being half of one of the most successful song writing duos in history and a member of a band that went beyond the boundaries of pop fame to cultural icon status.

I'll freely admit, I don't like Paul. Some of his bass lines are fun to play but the ego and the man get into the way. There is a strong cult of personality issue there. Its the same issue I have with Sting.



This
The Official "Rockin' Roadie"

-Lakland Skyline 44-02
-Fender Marcus Miller Jazz
-Fender MiM Precision
-Fender TC90 Thinline
-Squier Stratocaster w/mods (1989)
-Orange Dual Terror
-Marshall Valvestate 8280
-Marshall VS412
-Various pedals
#10
Quote by pwrmax
I was playing bass on Beatles Rock Band and I noticed that Paul has a lot of really groovy basslines, which lead me to learn a few tunes and made me realize that not all of them are that easy to play. Even on the recording, his rhythm is dead on tight ... before the days of ProTools and quantizing. I thought that might have been just for the new remastered version but listening to my dad's old records from 40 years ago and his performance is just as tight on them.

So how come when people talk about amazing bassists there's almost never a mention of Sir Paul?


I love Paul McCartney's basslines and think they deserve more recognition too, unfortunately he's a pop bassist.

More complicated or specific genre's (i.e. more difficult to play) tend to attract dedicated (and opinionated) musicians who are the ones that bring attention to musicians. Snobbery tends to prevent pop musicians getting noticed for how good they are. Couple this with the fact that he's the singer, makes me wonder how many Beatles fans actually know he plays bass.

I think I could have explained that better but oh well.
#11
I think it's the frong song which ruined him..also he's is a bit of a tool
#12
One thing working against Sir Paul as far as being recognized as a great bass player is the fact that he's been around forever. Paul McCartney got heaven only knows how many people started on bass back in the 60s and 70s, and he is still cited as a major influence by bassists of almost all genres. But he's been out of the limelight as a bassist for a long time. He seemed to play guitar or piano as much as he played bass back in the 70s with Wings. Also, as many people have already pointed out, he is best known as a songwriter and arranger as opposed to a bassist.

If this were 1970 instead of 2010, you probably wouldn't feel a need to ask such a question. McCartney is highly respected as a bassist. But the torch has been passed to others with far more technical ability than he has. Still, people like Jaco and Victor Wooten cited him as a strong influence. And the man is still playing after all these years. He's definitely one of the greats.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#13
Hang on, whoa, step back a second there...

McCartney was in a band BEFORE Wings?
Quote by silent caution
When i was younger i used to pee in peoples shoes and blame their dog
#14
Quote by Chylyn
Hang on, whoa, step back a second there...

McCartney was in a band BEFORE Wings?

this is new to me too.

google says they are called 'the Beatles'. sounds kinda like a bunch of teens learned to guitar and started singing about their girlfriends.

now my Paul knowledge is really coming together.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#15
Quote by FatalGear41

If this were 1970 instead of 2010, you probably wouldn't feel a need to ask such a question. McCartney is highly respected as a bassist. But the torch has been passed to others with far more technical ability than he has. Still, people like Jaco and Victor Wooten cited him as a strong influence. And the man is still playing after all these years. He's definitely one of the greats.


First off a video--

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obFcsEtFIKA. A guitarist friend sent this to me when I whined about having to root note through someone's song. It just strikes me funny every time I watch it


Back when you were all a twinkle in yer mom's eye and I walked the earth (yeah--those 70s), Macca still wasn't really seen as a "bass player" but as a Beatle. Bass was Jack Bruce or John Entwistle or that funky guy from Sly and the Family Stone, Larry Graham. Paul's fame then as it is now, is firmly rooted in the fact he was a solid song writer and a member of the worlds most famous band. Emphasis on the later.
#16
John Paul Jones >>>>>>>> Entwistle.
Quote by silent caution
When i was younger i used to pee in peoples shoes and blame their dog
#17
Quote by Chylyn
John Paul Jones >>>>>>>> Entwistle.


O hai subjectivity.

On topic, in my mind, Paul McCartney was a vocalist more so than a bassist, and as such was overlooked, even though some of his basslines were okay. Comparable to Phil Lynott really; I think some of his bass playing in Thin Lizzy was brilliant, but he doesn't get acknowledged for it all too often because people know him as a vocalist more than they do as a bassist.

On the other end of the bassist+vocalist spectrum we have people like Geddy Lee and Les Claypool, who are talked about much more in the world of bass players than vocalists, because they're fantastic bass players and that seems to take precedence over their vocals (not to try and undermine Geddy's vocals though, I love them).

You've also got to bare in mind that his bass playing, while arguably being innovative and a breath of fresh air at the time, is somewhat stale by todays standard (in my opinion anyway). I accept the contribution the Beatles made to the development of music, but I don't personally like them very much at all. It's all a matter of taste, but I think when it comes to that same sort of simple-but-catchy, almost minimalistic style of bass playing, there are players nowadays who excel at it far more than McCartney did.
Last edited by Ziphoblat at Sep 17, 2010,
#19
Quote by Spaz91
I love Paul McCartney's basslines and think they deserve more recognition too, unfortunately he's a pop bassist.

More complicated or specific genre's (i.e. more difficult to play) tend to attract dedicated (and opinionated) musicians who are the ones that bring attention to musicians. Snobbery tends to prevent pop musicians getting noticed for how good they are. Couple this with the fact that he's the singer, makes me wonder how many Beatles fans actually know he plays bass.

I think I could have explained that better but oh well.



Here's a thought, maybe you REALLY like the Beatles, got offended when you found out that somebody doesn't think McCartney is a great BASS player ( There are lots of them out there so be prepared to get offended a lot) So you focus on his positives and you slight over his negatives in hopes that you'll change people's views?


Let's clear this up. Being a good musician doesn't mean you'll be amazing at every instrument. Having a knack for songs doesn't mean you'll be Pastorius.

Paul McCartney gets tons of recognition for his song WRITING. He can't be good at everything, grow up Beatle marks
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Sep 17, 2010,
#20
Whether you like him or hate him his bass lines are unique. Every time I attempt to learn a Beatles song I find myself in the middle of counter-intuitive finger patterns. Plus, he's all over the fretboard in many of the songs. Day Tripper about killed me.

Point is, I become a better bassist with each song of his I learn.
#21
The funny thing about Macca is that he basically just 'had' to play bass. He was a guitarist and then the Beatles started to get into fruition and they kicked their bassist and one of them had to switch instruments and it ended up being him.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#22
Quote by lordofthefood1
The funny thing about Macca is that he basically just 'had' to play bass. He was a guitarist and then the Beatles started to get into fruition and they kicked their bassist and one of them had to switch instruments and it ended up being him.

Lennons big reason for not switching himself was he just got a new Rickenbacker
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#24
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Here's a thought, maybe you REALLY like the Beatles

I stopped reading there. I said I liked his bass lines. I hate the Beatles in general with quite a passion.
#25
Quote by pwrmax

So how come when people talk about amazing bassists there's almost never a mention of Sir Paul?


Because they aren't aware of how bass playing evolved from the 50's to the 70's and who contributed what to the evolution.

Macca is as much a cornerstone of modern bass playing as are Joe Osborn, Lee Sklar, Larry Knechtel or Carole Kaye, who for the same reasons, make it even less often in the popularity polls.
#26
Quote by the humanity
Lennons big reason for not switching himself was he just got a new Rickenbacker

Lennon actually stole a hollow body from a show they were supposed to play. It was like midnight and there were still about eight bands to play. They left so they could catch the last bus (or train?) back to town and Lennon just picked up a guitar and was like, "Well, this trip wasn't a total bust.."
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#27
Quote by lordofthefood1
They left so they could catch the last bus (or train?) back to town and Lennon just picked up a guitar and was like, "Well, this trip wasn't a total bust.."


Typical scouser
#28
Quote by lordofthefood1
The funny thing about Macca is that he basically just 'had' to play bass. He was a guitarist and then the Beatles started to get into fruition and they kicked their bassist and one of them had to switch instruments and it ended up being him.


Actually their original bass player, Stuart Sutcliffe, quit the band to stay in Germany and go back to being an artist. He died in '61 of a brain tumour if I remember right. He and Lennon were the ones who actually came up with the name "Beatles".

Yeah...I have really amazingly stupid pieces of trivia stored in my head.


On Paul being acknowledged as a top ten bassist. I guess I'm not reading the same polls you folks are, because Macca always seems to make the top 10 or 20 bass players.
#30
Quote by anarkee
Actually their original bass player, Stuart Sutcliffe, quit the band to stay in Germany and go back to being an artist. He died in '61 of a brain tumour if I remember right. He and Lennon were the ones who actually came up with the name "Beatles".

Yeah...I have really amazingly stupid pieces of trivia stored in my head.


On Paul being acknowledged as a top ten bassist. I guess I'm not reading the same polls you folks are, because Macca always seems to make the top 10 or 20 bass players.

I paraphrased hoping somebody would post the story with name and numbers.

when I mean began to fruition, I mean the events leading up from Lennon and some bands before (wasn't the original idea for the beatles actually the silver beetles?). So like, I mean, the time including the spiritual precursor up until actually 'the beatles'.

I reread this and found it confusing, oh well...
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#31
Quote by lordofthefood1
Lennon actually stole a hollow body from a show they were supposed to play. It was like midnight and there were still about eight bands to play. They left so they could catch the last bus (or train?) back to town and Lennon just picked up a guitar and was like, "Well, this trip wasn't a total bust.."

according ot george harrison, john only paid £1 for his mapleglo rickenbacker, too. it was in a shop in hamburg, he paid £1 as a deposit and left the shop with it and never went back to pay the rest

Just as calibos said - Typical scouser

but people don't really recoginse the beatles for their musicianship as much as they recognise the songwriting.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#32
Paul is dead died back in the 60s they got a look a like to be the new Paul.
Quote by kaptkegan
Don't think I've ever been sigged.


I pretty much never leave the drug thread anymore.
#33
You really necro bumped a thread that's almost a year old just to say that?
Quote by skater dan0
Damn you and your ninja-like modding