#1
Hey been thinking of getting my hands on a shecter guitar, preffurably an Avenger. I want to know what your opinions are guys. I mainly play rock, Metal. I'm Currently in College Majoring in Music Business & Tech and I want to be really diverse in music such as playing vast genres like blues, jazz, ect... I hear shecters are very diverse in tone due to their coil splits in the pick ups.
#2
They suck, they're ****ing awful, don't ever get one, they'll rob you and murder your family.


...

But seriously, that question is way too vague. Subjectivity aside, every company makes cheap guitars, as well as expensive guitars, and everything in between. The Avenger is one of Schecters higher end guitars (assuming it's a Hellraiser.)

But really, any guitar can be coil split, if you spend $10 on a coil split pot. It's not really some fancy thing. Schecters, imo, are overrated. Not that my opinion matters.

Anyway, diversity is all in your amp. If you have a good amp for what you want to do, the guitar won't matter much. We can't possibly tell you if a Schecter will be right for you or not, because only you can know that. Even the most expensive, versatile guitar in the world can be crap for any one person if it doesn't fit in their hands well. Which brings me to the most important part of buying a guitar: Does it fit well in your hand? That should always be the primary concern. Any guitar can do any genre - but only some guitars will actually feel good to you.
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#3
Quote by Offworld92
They suck, they're ****ing awful, don't ever get one, they'll rob you and murder your family.


...

But seriously, that question is way too vague. Subjectivity aside, every company makes cheap guitars, as well as expensive guitars, and everything in between. The Avenger is one of Schecters higher end guitars (assuming it's a Hellraiser.)

But really, any guitar can be coil split, if you spend $10 on a coil split pot. It's not really some fancy thing. Schecters, imo, are overrated. Not that my opinion matters.

Anyway, diversity is all in your amp. If you have a good amp for what you want to do, the guitar won't matter much. We can't possibly tell you if a Schecter will be right for you or not, because only you can know that. Even the most expensive, versatile guitar in the world can be crap for any one person if it doesn't fit in their hands well. Which brings me to the most important part of buying a guitar: Does it fit well in your hand? That should always be the primary concern. Any guitar can do any genre - but only some guitars will actually feel good to you.

This.

Schecters are good value in the United States, but Europeans like me don't bother with them. That's assuming we're talking about the Korean ones (basically anything under a grand).

What styles will sound good or authentic through your rig depends on your amp(s) for the biggest part.
#4
Quote by TheQuailman
This.

Schecters are good value in the United States, but Europeans like me don't bother with them. That's assuming we're talking about the Korean ones (basically anything under a grand).

What styles will sound good or authentic through your rig depends on your amp(s) for the biggest part.


Not necessarily. I'd like to see someone play Meshuggah with a Telecaster.

Different guitars are meant for different styles. An ESP M-II will sound completely different to say a Fender Eric Johnson Strat. Because woods, pickups and construction are different. Metal oriented guitars have pickups with higher output to drive the amp harder. A blues oriented guitar(ie SSS Strat) will have sparkly and twangy cleans, as compared to the thick, warm, slightly dark sound you get from say an Ibanez RG.

Even the number of strings matter. Jazz and metal artists use 7 string and sometimes 8 string guitars. Afore mentioned band uses 8 strings. Some guitars are designed for low tunings (B and below) such as ESP's baritone range. They come with extra long scales to reduce string flabbiness. Some guitars have raised frets(XJ frets)/scallopped fretboards to prevent the string from touching the wood(Any Schecter/ESP will have XJ's. Fender's Yngwie Malmsteen Strat is scalloped).

Basically, find a guitar which sounds good to you, plays well in your hand, pair it up with an amp which suits your playing style.

^ is right about subjectivity. I can't stand Les Paul style bodies. The same thing might deel like heaven to someone else.
#5
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Not necessarily. I'd like to see someone play Meshuggah with a Telecaster.

Notice I said "for the biggest part".

And there's Teles with humbuckers in the bridge.
#6
Alright, I've taken to account what everyones thoughts are on this and yea your right. Whatever is comfortable with me might not be comfortable for another guitar player. I'm just ganna have to go ahead and do some experimentation on the different guitars, amps, and gears to find my favorite thing. Thanks for posting.
#7
I've been a very happy schecter owner for a couple of years now but they aren't as diverse in their tones as many would say. They do give a passable imitation of a lot of tones but they don't do a few others. Some of the newer models lack balls and bottom, definitely try before you buy.

I think the good ones are very good and the rest are very, very meh. And avoid their 8 strings.

Not necessarily. I'd like to see someone play Meshuggah with a Telecaster.


I tell you sir, as a massive Meshuggah fan, that I have come across some amazingly brutal Shuggah style tones on a Tele.

Tele's are monster guitars with far more balls and beast than many "made for metal" guitars.

Totally agreed on the point though - horses for courses. ^_^
#8
Quote by chidori730
I hear shecters are very diverse in tone due to their coil splits in the pick ups.

imo coil splits are overrated. Unless you've got a humbucker that is overpoweringly thick sounding, generally when you switch to using just one coil, you get a very weak, thin sound that's hardly usable for anything - really nothing like a "true" single coil tone. i've heard that switching the coils to parallel instead of cutting one out of the signal is much more effective but never actually tried this.

I personally think the way schecter used to do it in the '70s and '80s was better - with coil taps - i know someone who has an old MIJ schecter telecaster copy with very hot, overwound single coils that are tonally closer to P-90s, and then push/pull pots which tap the coils to use less windings and give a more traditional tele tone. it works very well indeed.
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#9
Schecters are good value in the United States…

+1. Catch a Schecter on sale and you’re getting a great Korean guitar at Agile prices without having to pay for shipping.

Unless you've got a humbucker that is overpoweringly thick sounding, generally when you switch to using just one coil, you get a very weak, thin sound…

I can see how that’s true for many guitars, but Schecter tends to use hot SD pickups on guitars that give really dark tones, and splitting them gives a really nice mellow stratty tone without so much twang. Or at least it does on the good ones, I stay away from the models with those icky “Duncan Designed” pickups.
#10
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Not necessarily. I'd like to see someone play Meshuggah with a Telecaster.

Different guitars are meant for different styles. An ESP M-II will sound completely different to say a Fender Eric Johnson Strat. Because woods, pickups and construction are different. Metal oriented guitars have pickups with higher output to drive the amp harder. A blues oriented guitar(ie SSS Strat) will have sparkly and twangy cleans, as compared to the thick, warm, slightly dark sound you get from say an Ibanez RG.

Even the number of strings matter. Jazz and metal artists use 7 string and sometimes 8 string guitars. Afore mentioned band uses 8 strings. Some guitars are designed for low tunings (B and below) such as ESP's baritone range. They come with extra long scales to reduce string flabbiness. Some guitars have raised frets(XJ frets)/scallopped fretboards to prevent the string from touching the wood(Any Schecter/ESP will have XJ's. Fender's Yngwie Malmsteen Strat is scalloped).

Basically, find a guitar which sounds good to you, plays well in your hand, pair it up with an amp which suits your playing style.

^ is right about subjectivity. I can't stand Les Paul style bodies. The same thing might deel like heaven to someone else.



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been looking for a chance to post that.
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#12
I had a gryphon for a while and its been one of the nicest guitars ive ever played. I think unless your willing to spend around 300+ you won't get to good of one.
#13
I've got a Hellraiser C7. I'd say it's worth exactly what I paid for it. It's a great guitar, but it's not like it's overpowering or anything

Mind you I've got a 07' model, so no coiltaps for me