#1
So My warmups are usually going across various pentatonic modes, scales and some strumming to a metronome.

I recently switched to using hydrogen (awesome drum machine) so I will do my scales and such to a simple 4 beat. hat kick hat snare... repeat.

My loop starts on a hat hit but I notice I always start playing/counting on the first kick. when I tried counting on the hat hits I found myself having a lot of trouble. I dropped my bpm to something around 30 and then I was able to do it after a little struggling, but focusing pretty hard untill I got into a good groove with it.

any good excersizes for improving counting with a drum kit? or just building up rhythm
#2
im not sure if this is the answer ur looking for, but playing with an actual drummer helps alot...that being said, i also need help with my rhythm...so if you get any good ideas, would u mind sending me a pm? thanks
#3
Play in a band. That's easiest way, if you're going to do solowork only you have to practice as much as a solist, which is pretty unbearable (2-4 hours a day).
Count 1 (and a), 2 (and a), 3 (and a), 4 (and a) on the beats also helps.

But really, just play with a band.
#4
Agreed - best thing that helped me was playing with a band. Next best thing is to do some improv along to other tracks or jam tracks. This will get your "real life" timing spot on with some practice. Theres a good free improv course here

By the way, I bought a Dr.Drum drum machine - rubbish! Just in case anyones lucky enough to see this post!
#5
I just moved to a new town a little while ago. and I don't really know anyone to jam with so I figured playing with a drum track is better than a metronome... Is there any software that's like an improvisational backing drummer? it seems like I wouldn't be terribly difficult to create If you knew a little drum theory (I don't). But Just something that could play more or less intelligently that I could react to would be nice.
#6
Building rhythm takes some practice, I strongly suggest using a metronome at first. Drum machines are cool, but very predictable, and they never change, this makes learning to improv rhythm effectively very difficult. If you can find a drummer that will really help.

If you have a Mac, you can use grarage band and create a drum track that uses a few different loops, that can almost simulate a drummer. I do sugest if you do this, to sometimes make the change between loops be as awkward as possible, because nothing helps your rhythm more than mistakes made by the drummer.

I'm serious, since joinnig the band I'm in now (the drummer was new to it when we started, litterally had no experience), I have become way better at rhythm, mostly because whenever the drummer makes a mistake, I have to figure something out, to make it sound like it was on purpose, as well as keep the beat so he can just swing right back in.

Also if you want to work on your rhythm with some songs I suggest trying to learn grunge or popish songs, such as:
Would - Alice in Chains
Plush - Stone Temple Pilots
Brain Stew and Jaded - Green Day
Faith - George Michael
Outside - Staind
Spare Me the Details - The Offspring

no they aren't the best songs in the world, but they have alot of rhythm guitar in them.
#7
Metronome, from slow to fast. Play different strumming patterns and such until you get the hang of them.

I was pretty bad rhythmically until I joined my first serious band. I had to get better quickly, and you do if you're in a band. Try jamming with a drummer as much as possible, slow at first. Also, ALWAYS count, at least until you're pretty good rhythmically. I can't stress how much counting will help you. Even if you get off you can find your way back into the song. Playing on time with other people is super important, and so much different than play by yourself. I feel like a lot of musicians just starting out don't realize that until they play a lot with other people. I definitely didn't.
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Last edited by StreetLight3989 at Sep 15, 2010,
#8
Quote by somekid413
So My warmups are usually going across various pentatonic modes, scales and some strumming to a metronome.

I recently switched to using hydrogen (awesome drum machine) so I will do my scales and such to a simple 4 beat. hat kick hat snare... repeat.

My loop starts on a hat hit but I notice I always start playing/counting on the first kick. when I tried counting on the hat hits I found myself having a lot of trouble. I dropped my bpm to something around 30 and then I was able to do it after a little struggling, but focusing pretty hard untill I got into a good groove with it.

any good excersizes for improving counting with a drum kit? or just building up rhythm



Build it up slowly. A drumkit is a great alternative to a metronome. You will get the hang of it soon enough. In the absence of either of these, tap your foot! If you make a point to always keep the beat when playing, it will become natural to you very quickly.
#9
I am a dedicaated Drummer. I have been playing awhile now and I recently moved on to guitar and I cant tell you how important rhythem is. All drumming is , is, Time, Rhythem, Co-ordination and feel. My experience with drums directly helped me with the guitar. I could strum straight away, no problems and can do some really complicated stuff too.

So I suggest you learn the drums abit. Even if its just one or two grooves. It will help greatly! Plus adding other instruments to your portfolio is always good!
#10
I actually have a drum kit I played a basic 4 beat and such with a metronome. I feel like an asshat owning it because I don't know how to play it. I got it for free essentially (buying, fixing and selling/trading stuff on craiglsist) (its a roland td5)

but are there any specific drills people do to work timing?
#11
Quote by somekid413
[...]

but are there any specific drills people do to work timing?


The beauty of it is that you can turn pretty much anything you play into a rhythm drill by using a metronome, drummer or your foot and to really make a point to keep the beat.

In other words, practise (ie. play songs) and you will get better. Practise a lot and you will get better faster.
#12
Quote by somekid413
I actually have a drum kit I played a basic 4 beat and such with a metronome. I feel like an asshat owning it because I don't know how to play it. I got it for free essentially (buying, fixing and selling/trading stuff on craiglsist) (its a roland td5)

but are there any specific drills people do to work timing?


Basically you need to try and feel where the "one" is in any drum beat. It's not always easy but being able to feel the "one" will help no end. If it takes a bit of thinking about at first then so be it, better to think about it hard until you find you can do it without thinking than never gain the skill.

Quote by willemhdb
The beauty of it is that you can turn pretty much anything you play into a rhythm drill by using a metronome, drummer or your foot and to really make a point to keep the beat.


In the past I've used the indicators of a car I was driving as a click to practice rhythm to Was stopped at a set of traffic lights so I started tapping out different groups. I got up to 5s before my instructor noticed
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#13
Drills for practising timing on the drums and guitar :P?

Urm For drums I can suggest practising along to songs even if ur just playing a standard drum beat. PRactising to a metronome is great BUT! Its boring.. Practising to songs is just as useful! Because most songs these days are recorded to metronomes!

Practise ur standard 4/4 beat. 1 2 3 4 on Hi Hat
1 and 3 on Bass Drum
2 and 4 on Snare

PRactise good timing with just ur hands too.

1 2 3 4 1+2+3+4+ R L R L RLRLRLRL


On guitar I would suggest practising 12 bar blues for both Rhythem guitar practising and chord changes.

Always keep your right foot going. Tap tap tap tap. 1 2 3 4 . It will be harder keeping ur foot going but It will pay off with increased timing accuracy! I do this automatically seen as I play the drums and it always keeps my rhthem in check!

Here is a good easy way of working out 12 bar blues progressions,

a 1 4 5 progressions is what ever power or barre chord your playing on the low E string.. Then Directly up 1 String is the 4 and then across 2 fretts is the 5.. Have a mess around thats all I can suggest!

Hope some of this helps! Timing is important for everything especially drums..

If your drumming and your not in time. Your NOT a drummer. :P

Timing is something that on occasions a guitarist can get away with but with a drummer it sticks out like a sore thumb! xD I know for past experience! xD
Last edited by Aappleyard at Sep 17, 2010,
#14
Maybe just feel the groove?
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