#1
hey

So ive been playing for the past 2 years or so. Im pretty good with technique and i would say ok (not great) with improvisation. I want to learn music theory (scales, modes, what not) but im kinda confused about it. i know what intervals and notes are and i have learned the G major scale. but im having difficulty remembering what notes are in which scale (except C maj). Basically I'd like some tips to memorise the scales. what notes are in which, and so on

any help would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance
#2
Simple repetition with building scales should lead to memorization.

For example if you forget what notes are in Ab major that's alright. Just build the scale based on the intervals, and you'll have the notes. The more you do this, the quicker you'll become at determining the notes of a scale.

Also, check out the circle of fifths. It's a great resource for determining key signatures and the notes of diatonic scales.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
If you mean learning the actual notes, I find it easier to practice the scales on a piano, because I know the notes better than on guitar. Try naming the notes as you play them, too
Rotten Playground
Listen to me and Jameh muck about on a podcast
as if you have anything better to do.


Quote by Reverend_Taco
Grass stains on my dicks

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Pfft. Gay? Nah, gay is the manliest sex that exists.
#4
"Try naming the notes as you play them, too"<<<<< THIS (you may sound silly as you do it but it helps A LOT!)

I always start on A since its easy to remember going from abcdefg.

So, imo try learning the scale with a root note on A and it might be easier to remember.
#5
Well, the easiest way I've found is not to sit there and name the notes, but to number the intervals.

For example, check this out.

1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7

Those are the intervals of the minor scale. I can pick Eminor and map it out as:

1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7
E, F#, G, A, B, C, D

You can do that with any scale, not just Eminor. Once you know the intervals of the scale, you can find the notes no matter if it's Eminor or C#minor. You just plug the notes into the intervals. It saves all this useless memorization too.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 15, 2010,
#6
The best thing to do is run up and down the Ionian (major) scale until you could do it blindfolded. Familiarize yourself with different all the different positions so your fingers automatically hit the right note no matter where you are on the fretboard. Once you've got the Ionian scale down try using the second tone as a root and playing around the Dorian mode, then Phrygian, etc. You'll get a feel for the different scale tones and what sounds good over what.
#7
Quote by hendrix69
The best thing to do is run up and down the Ionian (major) scale until you could do it blindfolded. Familiarize yourself with different all the different positions so your fingers automatically hit the right note no matter where you are on the fretboard. Once you've got the Ionian scale down try using the second tone as a root and playing around the Dorian mode, then Phrygian, etc. You'll get a feel for the different scale tones and what sounds good over what.
That's not how you use modes...

Modes are not scales.
#8
how do you use modes? :S

anyway back to the point im wondering how should i practice. should i play the same scale in different keys over and over again and when they are down move on to another scale?
#9
Quote by ZubierAbd
how do you use modes? :S
I suggest you stay away from modes until you have a strong understanding of tonal harmony, as they will only confuse you more.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by ZubierAbd
how do you use modes? :S


Most people don't use them. Stay away from modes for now, they will confuse you.