#1
I've noticed, the pickup selectors on many guitars label the bridge pickup as 'lead' and the neck pickup as 'rhythm'. I've realized that after all this time, I've been using them the other way around, I typically use the bridge for a crunchy rhythm tone and the neck for cleans and leads. Is it typical for hard rock players to get a better rhythm tone using the "lead" pickup, and vice versa?
#2
I use bridge for everything, except sweeping and "creamy" sounding stuff. So no, I have yet to see someone play rock/metal on the neck pickup.
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#5
As far as I know, the reason each pickup is labeled as it is has to do with the preference of jazz players at the time electric guitars/amplification was coming out. The neck p-up lent itself to comping along with a band (i.e playing chords, warm sound), and the rhythm pickup had enough bite to cut through during a solo section. It's the opposite today for rock/metal. The bridge is used for the rhythm. There's no 'right/wrong' way, but if you're looking for a certain sound one or the other will get you there.
Last edited by TsarBomba at Sep 15, 2010,
#6
I do:
Bridge - Distorted rhythm
Bridge - Distorted leads, mostly lower notes but I use it up high a fair bit too
Neck - Some leads, specifically in the high frets and also for real fast playing - sweeping, etc.
Neck - Anything clean, rhythm and leads.

This is just for my normal stuff, but if for some reason I've wound up in a blues jam session or something then I'll stick to neck the whole way.
#7
I use the neck for leads and the bridge for rhythm. I, personally don't like the "harshness" I get from playing solo's on the bridge pup. I guess you can say that "I wanna make it cry and sing" I dunno what happened to me. I have become a "tone freak" of sorts.

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#9
I'm a John Petrucci fan, therefore, I use the neck pickup for leads. Makes me sound better than I actually am =]
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#10
Use the neck for rhythm, use the bridge for leads, **** around with the tone controls, do whatever you think sounds good. Don't let people tell you there's a right or wrong in this case.
#11
Depends what I'm playing and the sound I want to get when I'm playing it. In some songs, I'll repeat something, but switch pickups to give it a new sound. Very Satriani of me
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#12
I use whatever works, sometimes I like playing rythms on the neck pup and sometimes I'm more in the mood for bridge pup rythms, it all depends on what I'm playing and what sound I want.
#14
Bridge for gainy rhythms, neck for most leads, might switch to bridge for lead stuff further down the neck or harmonics. Neck pickup wired in parallel for some mid-gain lead stuff and the inside coils of both pickups for clean stuff generally.

None of these are rules though, it's all about what you need for the sound you hear in your head.
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#15
i use my neck pick-up for metal and everything else
rarely use my bridge pick up, it sounds like shit to me.
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#16
Bridge pup most of the time. I think Trent Reznor used the neck pickup on a LP on some live video for a really tight distortion tone.
#17
ignore the labelling - it's a dated system that generally only applied to clean tones back when amps weren't really loud enough to compete with a large brass section and a grand piano in a big jazz band and required the extra treble of a bridge pickup in order to have any presence in the mix for lead work.

usually which pickup i use depends on the sound - unless it's clean, i rarely use a neck humbucker for rhythm, and for leads i find any humbucker works well, again, depending on the type of sound i want. With single coils i find they tend to work well for both rhythm and lead whichever position they are in, but i actually find myself preferring the neck pickup for rhythm and the bridge for leads
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#19
Quote by TsarBomba
As far as I know, the reason each pickup is labeled as it is has to do with the preference of jazz players at the time electric guitars/amplification was coming out. The neck p-up lent itself to comping along with a band (i.e playing chords, warm sound), and the rhythm pickup had enough bite to cut through during a solo section. It's the opposite today for rock/metal. The bridge is used for the rhythm. There's no 'right/wrong' way, but if you're looking for a certain sound one or the other will get you there.


+1


Personally I use Bridge pickup for everything because switching pickups in the middle of a song usually throws me off, lol. Although in some cases I will use the neck pickup for a clean tone live. In the studio though is a little different, im more apt to try the neck pickup on a solo, lead or clean part in the studio setting trying to find the 'right' tone. In the past I have used the neck pickup for a regular distorted rhythm tone once or twice.

But yeah whatever pickup you choose to use is up to you.
Last edited by AkiraSpectrum at Sep 16, 2010,
#20
Switching the pickups in between songs can throw me off, but not very often. I usually use the neck for leads and the bridge for rhythm.
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#21
Quote by Ghostmaker
I've noticed, the pickup selectors on many guitars label the bridge pickup as 'lead' and the neck pickup as 'rhythm'. I've realized that after all this time, I've been using them the other way around, I typically use the bridge for a crunchy rhythm tone and the neck for cleans and leads. Is it typical for hard rock players to get a better rhythm tone using the "lead" pickup, and vice versa?

i use any pickup that gives the tone i desire. usually its either the neck or bridge. usually i go for a eric johnson or eric clapton cream era type of tone. clean stuff ill usually use the neck. but on the bridge for leads, ill have the tone really low getting close to the tone of the neck but without the neck sound. i find with higher gain it sounds almost computer like. on the bridge you get that nice violin type tone if you set it right.
#22
I use my neck/mid for chuggy riffs (when i say this im talking about heavy) and i actually rarely use the bridge, cept for some stuff, but that's it, i really never use it lol.

Why bother when my neck pup is so sexy :3
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