#1
I'VE SEARCHED THIS BEFORE POSTING!

Either that, or I'm just really bad at coming up with keywords.

Back on topic, what really constitutes good playability for a guitar? Thin neck? Smooth frets? Recently, I've been having this notion in my head that it's not my technique that needs working on, but it's my guitar that's holding me back.

I'm playing on what you would call a starter guitar. It came with an amp, which, as far as I'm concerned, doesn't blow, for about 230 USD. But the apparent exact same guitar with a different body wood is sold out at the place where I got my guitar, so there's a chance that I just plain suck.

On another note, it seems to me that the guitars with black necks seem easier to play. My guitar's neck is dark brown, which seems strange because a small difference in the shade shouldn't make such a difference. Am I the only one that feels this way?

I understand that there is a very real possibility that I sound utterly stupid.
Last edited by triface at Sep 16, 2010,
#4
well smooth frets is always a plus, but i think a thin (or beefy) neck i just personal prefrence. im assuming that the black you are refering to is ebony, and the dark brown is rosewood. i've never seen and ebony fretboard on a starter guitar, so maybe the quality of he other guitar was just better, and the fretboard was smoother or something...but i may be wrong, so dont quote me
#5
Playability is determaned by whoever is playing. I mean, my prefrinces won't be the same as yours. Of course some guitars are just horrable. I suggest playing as many guitars as you can get your hands on to figure out what works best for YOU! Good luck and have fun.
#6
Some of it is subjective, like fretboard width, body shape, neck profile, fret sizes, and such. But things like unneven frets or a bowing neck are universally bad.

Also, satin finish necks? Yes please.
Quote by Wisthekiller
tl;dr How does one safely remove the smell of a corpse from a banjo?


Would you run down past the fence?

Tell us, is the black box lying?
#7
from what I'm gathering you say the guitar came with the amp correct? if you bought one of those starter kits well then yes it's definitely for beginners. what brand is it? is it a crazy shaped guitar? was it 230$ for the amp or both? elaborate a little more bro. maybe the guitar just needs a real good setup, or maybe it's time to start saving for that upgrade if your that unhappy with it. i can't/won't pass any judgments but i play a little but of everything so it really doesn't matter to me what kind of guitar i'm playing i can get comfy with it pretty quick. even though i'm pretty faithful to the ibanez and esp companies i still remain partial to the dark fretboard you speak of. like i said i would need more details to guide ya in the right direction.
you can private message me if you want. i'm on here more than most people are on facebook so a response shouldnt take to long.

keep practicing though bro,
it will come to you......

vinni
"live to play, play to live"

05' ibanez s470qxdm
06' jackson dk2 pro series
peavey VK112 50watt
behringer x-Vamp-(soon to be digiT. rp500,
peavey vk120 watt half stack,

(debating on either s or rg prestige)
#8
You can always have a guitar improved by getting it serviced by someone who knows what they're doing, but as for pretty much everything else, that's personal preference. I love the sound of Warwick basses, but they're too hard to play for me personally.

All I can suggest is that you take your time finding a new guitar. Go and try things on a guitar twice the price of your current one, and see how it feels. Make sure you know what you like in a guitar before you put any money down.

Also, a neck's colour shouldn't particularly matter (rosewood, ebony etc) but what should matter is how well it's constructed.
#9
Quote by ScorianVaseras
You can always have a guitar improved by getting it serviced by someone who knows what they're doing, but as for pretty much everything else, that's personal preference. I love the sound of Warwick basses, but they're too hard to play for me personally.

.


+1

i quite liked the SG i tried out but the neck and body made it a no no for me
#10
Quote by prodigi
from what I'm gathering you say the guitar came with the amp correct? if you bought one of those starter kits well then yes it's definitely for beginners. what brand is it? is it a crazy shaped guitar? was it 230$ for the amp or both? elaborate a little more bro.

Yeah it's $230 for both the amp and the guitar. The guitar's a strat copy by a company named Timbre. They're an Indonesian company as far as I know.

Actually, I realised (A little too late) that my guitar isn't as bad as I made it out to be. It was set up when I bought it and the action and intonation is fine. It just doesn't feel as smooth as I want. But, still, it's a beginner guitar, so maybe I shouldn't be so picky.

Hm. I should really ball up and go around trying out guitars.
#11
Smooth frets, unfinished neck but still smooth, good access to higher frets, a neck shape that feels natural to my hands, that's what defines good playability for me :p.

Just go to the shop and try out alot of guitars with different neck profiles and see what shape attracts you the most, which feels most natural to your hands.
#12
good feeling neck
no sharp edges/hangups anywhere
solid - nothing loose
good fret work
smooth frets (sometimes you get some rust or rough frets and they feel scratchy)
GOOD ACTION- lowish with no buzz/dead notes
stays in tune! - especially after bends or trem use

black necks? like fretboard? thats preference and tone. has no effect besides the user. Or do you mean the WHOLE neck wood? cause generally if you get a rosewood neck or something its a custom guitar. and you drop serious bones for something like that.

the neck finish contributes a lot. some dont like gloss finishes on necks. some like matte or satin. others like just oil rubbed wood. some play so much the finish wears off completely and they just play on bare wood.

the back of my white epiphone had begun to get a yellowish tint from the sweat of my hand. because its a poly finish, it wont really wear. if it was a nitrocellulose finish, i would have probably started to wear away/corrode the finish with my sweat and use.

thus you get the broken in road worn guitar look (and the wood breathes better and all that jazz)
#13
Neck feel is a big one you don't want anything that feels uncomfortable Im a big ibanez fan and their rg necks and sa necks are really nice. Another thing I look for is if theres any buzzing and if the bridge can be lowered. If the action is high and theres buzzing and you dont feel comfortable adjusting a truss rod I would just leave it alone. The last thing is weight if a guitar ways alot it could wear on your shoulder a bit and get annoying.
#14
as has been said already - playability is subjective. good playability comes from having everything just the way you like it - neck profile, setup etc..
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#15
It all depends on how it feels to you. If it feels and plays good, it has good playability. I myself, for instance, like somewhat thin necks.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)
#16
Quote by triface
I'VE SEARCHED THIS BEFORE POSTING!

Either that, or I'm just really bad at coming up with keywords.

Back on topic, what really constitutes good playability for a guitar? Thin neck? Smooth frets? Recently, I've been having this notion in my head that it's not my technique that needs working on, but it's my guitar that's holding me back.

I'm playing on what you would call a starter guitar. It came with an amp, which, as far as I'm concerned, doesn't blow, for about 230 USD. But the apparent exact same guitar with a different body wood is sold out at the place where I got my guitar, so there's a chance that I just plain suck.

On another note, it seems to me that the guitars with black necks seem easier to play. My guitar's neck is dark brown, which seems strange because a small difference in the shade shouldn't make such a difference. Am I the only one that feels this way?

I understand that there is a very real possibility that I sound utterly stupid.


you are right in that it might be the guitar and not your technique. a good guitar can make things a lot easier.

but unfortunatly its all personal prefrence. for me, i like a strat type string spacing, scale length and neck shape. so i try to find guitars that have similar qualities. i prefer a 12" neck radius and i dont like the neck to be too wide or thick, but not too thin either. C shape is good for me in most cases.

also some cheaper guitars seem to have "slow necks" where they literally feel slow and dont allow you to move up and down the frets as fast.

not all cheap guitars are bad though. i have a squier affinity strat and i think the neck is pretty good for a cheap guitar. i dont like the little frets though. but the shape and feel are pretty close to what i like. my Godin has the prefect neck imo though.
#18
I guess that depends on a lot of variables--like your personal preferences, how long your fingers are, the frets (polished or not), space between frets (for some people wider is better, others no), the thickness of the neck, and (of course) the sound (if you like it then it is satisfying and you are more apt to continue).

The question is actually quite complicated.

ron666