#1
Is it/Was it as hard for other people as well or am I the only one here?

I get many advice on where to start, but it just confuses me in the end. All I'm doing is learning bits-and-pieces here-and-there, but I don't know how they all fit together to make the big picture.

If I don't understand something, I don't have anything to fall back on previously because I didn't lead up to anything, because I'm learning things in different portions.

Is there some kind of base I can start from and then lead up to different lessons. I've heard that everything leads back to the C Major Scale. Is that true? Where should I go from there?

Thank you!
Last edited by DominoK at Sep 16, 2010,
#2
Not nescesarily (sp? xD) the C major scale, more so just the major scale.
You should fully understand it, how it is formed using intervals, and how it can be altered to create various other scales such as minor scales.

What you can then do is try to learn about chord construction, and apply it in your playing. For example, try making different voicings for the same chord all around the neck.

There are lots of good lessons on this website, as well as all over the interwebs... Just reading stuff here in Musician Talk helps a lot as well!

If you have any questions feel free to PM me or someone else on this board, most are well willing to help!
#3
What really helped me was your run of the mill music textbook for college students. Yes, I did have a formal music education in both instruments and theory, but when I first began guitar last year, it had been years since I used any of my knowledge. I don't know how deep your pockets are, but a book helped refresh everything for me.

As someone else mentioned, you could easily find theory all over the internet. If I recall everything I learned started with learning the notes on the piano keyboard. Then moved to the most basic skills such as Major and Minor scale patterns. Then the circle of 5th's into intervals and so on.

Learning intervals is where it really started to click with my guitar practice, as this is where chords come from. I'm still not anything close to an accomplished guitarist, but I can say that I understand the theory of everything I play.
#4
This is interesting because I took everything on board as if I was learning how to change a tyre,

When I was taught diatonic harmony theory, key signatures and how to analyze jazz charts, it was one on one in front of a piano with my school music teacher once a week and I got everything down within 3 months more or less (not to blow my own horn)

i think it comes down to attitude, what you are taught and how you are taught and how much time you are given to take it all in. But for those 3 months I spent at least an 6 hours a week writing out every chord for every key. Cramming helps too

(N.B. When changing a tyre, you dont need to cram it 6 hours a week every week for 3 months)
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#5
Quote by Tominator_1991
This is interesting because I took everything on board as if I was learning how to change a tyre,

When I was taught diatonic harmony theory, key signatures and how to analyze jazz charts, it was one on one in front of a piano with my school music teacher once a week and I got everything down within 3 months more or less (not to blow my own horn)

i think it comes down to attitude, what you are taught and how you are taught and how much time you are given to take it all in. But for those 3 months I spent at least an 6 hours a week writing out every chord for every key. Cramming helps too

(N.B. When changing a tyre, you dont need to cram it 6 hours a week every week for 3 months)


Really? I teach the same thing to guitarists, in 2 weeks, and they have it forever.

Not the Jazz charts though, those do take a while to follow the progressions and analyse, I'll grant you. Theres no fast way to teach that, you have to really work with it and know your stuff...and be able to see and think ahead, with some of these backcycling and turnaround approaches.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by DominoK
Is it/Was it as hard for other people as well or am I the only one here?

I get many advice on where to start, but it just confuses me in the end. All I'm doing is learning bits-and-pieces here-and-there, but I don't know how they all fit together to make the big picture.

If I don't understand something, I don't have anything to fall back on previously because I didn't lead up to anything, because I'm learning things in different portions.

Is there some kind of base I can start from and then lead up to different lessons. I've heard that everything leads back to the C Major Scale. Is that true? Where should I go from there?

Thank you!



Sounds like you're trying to learn with the internet as your teacher.

Try starting with an actual teacher and/or a class. Use the internet as a supplement.
shred is gaudy music
#7
"The AB Guide To Music Theory" by Eric Taylor is a decent starting point, although it teaches you theory in general so you'll need to think about applying it to guitar.
Gear:
- Ibanez RGR465M
- Ibanez S770FM
- PRS SE Custom
- Blackstar HT-5 Mini Stack
#8
I found it hard to learn MT, still do. Never had any lessons (apart from 1 year of "Music" in secondary school, Every Good Boy Deseves Football is all I remember from that) and I didn't have any guidance when I wanted to learn so I was all over the place (trying to understand modes without knowing major scale for example).

I never thought i'd get it and I gave up a few times, it was very frustrating. It only started making sense when I started learning things from the very beginning (going back to Every Good Boy Deserves Football) and reading it over and over, writing it down over and over, testing it out over and over (you get the idea) until I was satisfied it made sense and I could do it on the guitar.

Some of the lessons here are very helpful, if you get stuck there is always someone here to answer your questions (btw there are no stupid questions, if you don't understand something then keeping quiet about it won't help, swallow your pride and ask).

As a first lesson:



Learn the notes on the fretboard. How you do this is up to you, there are programs out there (Fretboard Warrior) which can help, or you can just print off blank sheets and write down, say, every D note.

Another good way is to divide the fretboard up into individual frets - i.e. Learn the notes for all strings on the 5th fret and the 10th fret first (no sharps or flat notes) then move onto the 3rd and 6th fret (only one sharp/flat note) then the 8th fret (2 sharp / flat notes) and so on.

Also:

- Both E strings will have the same notes in the same location, by learning one string you automatically know a 2nd - you now know 2/6 strings.
- All strings repeat after the 12th fret, by learning the first 12 frets of you automatically know frets 12-24 - you now know all 24 frets of a single string.
-Octave shapes show you where notes repeat and help you get to grips with the board quicker. You may know what note is on 5th fret of A, but no clue where you are on the G string. Apply the octave shape and you'll find it much easier to find notes on foreign strings, the best thing is these shapes stay the same for every note so as long as you can remember the shape you're good to roll.

Octave shapes

e|-1 (F)-|----------|----------|----------|-13(F)----|
B|--------|-6 (F)---| 6 (F)----|----------|----------|
G|--------|----------|----------|10 (F)---| 10 (F)--|
D|-3 (F)-|-3 (F)---|----------|-----------|----------|
A|--------|----------| 8 (F)---| 8 (F)----|-----------|
E|-1 (F)-|----------|----------|----------|-13(F)----|

Sorry for crap tab