#1
So I recently strung up my home-made guitar for the first time. It's made entirely of maple, cos it's the only wood I could get, and it doesn't have a pickup yet so I played it "acoustically".

It sounds kind of thin and nasal, and when I play it, I don't feel the resonance in the body, like I do with my Ibanez guitar.

Now, with it being all maple with a bolt-on neck, I expect it to be bright, but this one sounds kind of acoustically dead. The neck joint is relatively tight (I can hold it up by the neck without any bolts) and it uses a hardtail bridge, with the strings going through the body.

I had some trouble cutting the nut slot. There was a bit of a gap between the slot and the bottom of the nut. I glued the nut in with epoxy hoping that would fill the gap, which it did. Is this what is causing the problem?

I'm also suspecting it might be the glue I used. I couldn't get any Titebond so I had to use UHU brand woodglue that they had at the local hardware store. It's a 2-piece body and the joint didn't turn out so well. The glue is a lot like PVA, except a bit harder when it's dry, but I'm afraid it has a detrimental effect on resonance.

Oddly enough, it sustains longer than by Ibanez does.

Can anyone suggest things to look out for that could improve the tone? Thanks in advance.

I hope my post makes sense.
#2
I would say the problem actually is the all-maple wood. Maple, though bright, doesn't really have a lot of anything else. There's reasons why we don't see a whole lot of all maple acoustics.
The only way to really make it sound 'fatter' or whatever is through the use of pickups.
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#3
Quote by Baby Joel
I would say the problem actually is the all-maple wood. Maple, though bright, doesn't really have a lot of anything else. There's reasons why we don't see a whole lot of all maple acoustics.
The only way to really make it sound 'fatter' or whatever is through the use of pickups.

I'd say he should first try making that joint a little less tight so that his neck is only attached through the bolts. Other than that, I can't think of anything.

My Dragon is all maple too, and imho it's not nasal but relatively resonant. Not warm, but its tone has a bright richness.
#4
Necks are pretty much supposed to be as tight as they can. Lots of luthiers do a 'neck joint test' and if they can hold the guitar up with the neck without any bolts or glue or anything, then the neck joint is good.
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#5
Thanks for the replies so far.

I've played maple solidbodies before and they didn't have this issue. They were bright and twangy, as expected. This one's a bit dead sounding. I don't know how to describe it. It's very quiet and sounds like there's something...missing.

I'd have thought that, regardless of the wood used, it would have some degree of resonance.
#6
Quote by 3-R4Z0R
I'd say he should first try making that joint a little less tight so that his neck is only attached through the bolts.


If you don't have any real knowledge, STOP speculating and DO NOT try and give advice. If you want resonance, sustain, etc, you want a TIGHT neck joint. As for the sound, pop in some pups already! Electrics always sound thin, but yeah, it's probably just the wood. If you had used something really soft like say balsa, then you'd feel it being all thunky and bassy, but it wouldn't have a bunch of sustain.