#1
I use a Line 6 POD when I record, running straight into my laptop via microphone input. It sounds ok, but I always get a pretty thin sound. Now, I understand that using Direct Input overall does give you a pretty thin sound, but when I use my Shure SM-57 mic'd up to my amp, it STILL sounds really thin.


My settings are Treb: 8, Bass: 5, Mids:3-5, Gain: 8. I was wondering if boosting my mids(like almost all the way) would get my sound thicker, but I haven't had the chance to try this yet. Anyone have any ideas on how to do this? I like the tone that I have, but it just needs to be thicker.
#3
Don't use a Line 6 product..
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#4
I haven't tried double tracking, but I have used a bass. I will look into the double tracking


And the Line 6 POD has been used by many artists to record, so......why not use it?
#5
Double or even quadruple tracking with various EQ and amps or amp settings is the way to get that thick GUITAR sound. To get a thick overall sound a bass is also a must.

Edit actually that video wasn't what I was looking for. Hold on.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Sep 16, 2010,
#6
Well Line 6 aren't particularly amazing in the first place, that's just my opinion though...

Boosting the mids and bass basically. Mids first. Then try bass. Obviously not all the way all at once, as that will dramatically alter your tone which you say you like. Just see how much you can get away with.
#7
Boost your mids and bass, maybe cut your highs. Double track. Should do the trick.
#8
Quote by epy
Don't use a Line 6 product..


anyway try recording with more mids than usual and turn your gain down otherwise you'll just get a mess of fuzz, the gain will build up when your tracking the guitars but it will be much cleaner and not muddy.
#9
All you line6 bandwagoners need to get out of this forum immediately.

Less gain, more mids and less treble.

Also, double the guitar tracks.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#10
Be careful about adding *too* many layers, though. In any recording, you have the recorded sounds, and the "air" in between the sounds. Too many layers eliminates all that "air" between the sounds, and results in a very small, congested sound. Thin out the tracks, introduce some air back in, and watch how much bigger and punchier it all gets.

Of course, it also helps to have equipment that will get you the big sounds in the first place.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#11
Thanks for the help everyone, I will definetly try everything mentioned.
#12
what chris said is very important. people talk about double or quadruple tracking all the time, but you have to know what you are doing with it. too many tracks and you start losing the definition, because everything sorta blurs together. which is actually great for some styles, but not what most people typically go for. start with double tracking (play the part twice with the same settings and gear to begin) and panning hard left and hard right. thats the simplest way to double track, so try that first.

next, fix your eq. brendan gave exactly what you need. more mids, less gain, and less treble. what you have now can sound good on its own, but wont sound good in a mix. guitars are supposed to sit in the midrange, so youve essentially taken the guitar out of its spot. though depending on your amp (model i guess) you may not really need boosted mids, but having them at 5 or so as a minimum is a good start.

then use a bass guitar to fill in the low end. a really good, thick sound isnt easy, but it isnt extremely difficult to get something that at least sounds full when you start getting some know-how.
#13
There is a lot of elements to a mix that make it sound thick/big. A guitar track on it's own more often than not will sound small. Start thinking in spacial terms not just your tone man, Double track guitars, quad track guitars. Adding bass guitar makes everything sound huge, not to mention drums behind that.

Also, have you got the right string gauge for your tuning?

But hey, I'm just repeating what has been said by people before
#14
On the topic of lowering me treble, I should have mention earlier that I am using a 7 string tuned down half a step. So, if I don't have alot of treble, and alot of bass,the sound starts to become very muddy and sloppy sounding. I should have put that in the original post.
#15
You can use layingering to get a heavier, more compressed tone.
#16
Also a thing to mention surely wojld be how you're recording the guitar. Micing the amp should be giving a better, thicker sound than DI. Maybe you're doing something wrong whehn micing it up? Just a suggestion. I don't know enough about recording to offer advice tbh but google search it and it comes up with tones of micing techniques.
#17
I'm using a Peavey Mini Colossal (smaller Satriani signature amp). I tried micing it, but I found I got that somewhat thin sound (lack of a professional studio and not knowing how to use a professional studio doesn't help). However, on the back of the amp is one of those three-prong mic outputs, which you plug directly into a mixing board (I plug into a usb device, and then into my computer). I just recorded a song... all the instruments are digital (Band in a Box), whereas the guitar is from my amp and direct into a usb device. I think it sounds pretty good. Under my user name, check the song Ode to Jimi. I'm also running into a wah, a Saturator (Satriani distortion), and a Line 6 Pod3 Live (sorry to say, lol).
#18
it's all in your gear and connectivity brother. if you had a good interface it would be a different story.
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#19
Quote by fastlanestoner
it's all in your gear and connectivity brother. if you had a good interface it would be a different story.


I would disagree and say it's more about technique and know how than gear. Of course you need decent gear to make quality recordings but I'd rather have my knowledge than a studio of gear.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#20
^ This is true. I bet Mutt Lange could make a way better recording using a Soundblaster card, an SM57 and Audacity than I could in a full-blown studio.

Similarly....

Give Nuno Bettencourt a Fender Squier and a 15W practice amp from Walmart and he could play the pants off it just the same - and still sound better than the 15 year old kid with the Les Paul and the Marshall Stack.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
USB connect it! when you connect it to a PC via USB(assuming you have downloaded Line6Monkey, and the drivers) you can use the POD like an audio interface to record with. in whatever program you are using, you would select the POD as the sound device instead of your default PC soundcard. the Audio quality will be alot better IMO, when ever i would record a POD i would go that route. when its late and i cant record an amp, i always fiddle with a POD at my computer desk, even when im not accually using it, its still being used as an audio interface for my Laptop for general use(youtube, itunes, basic PC stuff etc).
#22
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
USB connect it! when you connect it to a PC via USB(assuming you have downloaded Line6Monkey, and the drivers) you can use the POD like an audio interface to record with. in whatever program you are using, you would select the POD as the sound device instead of your default PC soundcard. the Audio quality will be alot better IMO, when ever i would record a POD i would go that route. when its late and i cant record an amp, i always fiddle with a POD at my computer desk, even when im not accually using it, its still being used as an audio interface for my Laptop for general use(youtube, itunes, basic PC stuff etc).



You got my attention, I do have Line 6 monkey/Line 6 edit, and I use them via Midi USB cables. Will those work to record???? Keep in mind I am using a POD 2.0, not the X3 or the ones that have a regular USB port.
#23
Quote by sXe170
You got my attention, I do have Line 6 monkey/Line 6 edit, and I use them via Midi USB cables. Will those work to record???? Keep in mind I am using a POD 2.0, not the X3 or the ones that have a regular USB port.


well monkey can connect via midi to USB so its possible it would work, the only way to test is to open up your recording program with the POD connected with the Midi-USB and see if it is listed in the audio settings.

sorry bout that if it doesnt work, i forgot the POD 2.0 didnt have the regular USB connection, but Midi is worth a try.

honestly if that dont work you could go another route and get a USB audio interface and connect the POD to that, i use a Lexicon lambda, M-Audio makes some aswell. whenever i connected a POD straight into the a Mic input on a laptop or an integrated soundcard on a desktop it was always buzzy and fizzy sounding when i played back the recording.
Last edited by WaltTheWerewolf at Sep 18, 2010,
#25
'Direct' input overall does not give a thin sound. Some of the older technology that uses that can but. You should be able to get fat/thick tones out of a POD, maybe not that warm or authentic but. Hell, you can probably get a bunch of amazing tones out of it BUT

BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT

Quick question, are you listening back to it on your laptop speakers? :P hahahaha
#26
That's a good point... one needs 'flat' studio monitor speakers. I don't have those... I'm using old Klipshe Herasy II speakers, which have a bit of bassyness to them. If using headphones, I prefer Sony, which gives a slightly truer sound. That's important for both listening back and dumping to CD for others to listen to on their systems. In the past I used these heavy bass DJ headphones... and crap... listening to it on other systems not only sounded tinny, but thin and very trebly.
#27
If you're making a song for your girlfriend to listen to in her car, demo it in her car.

If you're making a song for the world to listen to, demo it on the best dam studio monitors you can get your hands on.

Basically everything is going to sound thin through laptop speakers. Thin, or weak.