#1
I've recently decided to de-fret the bottom half of my first act bass for funsies and i was also tanking 'bout some new pick-ups so I wanted to see if my fellow bassers had an input that would be helpful.
#4
By all means defret your bass, its not a terribly difficult procedure. I would suggest you defret the whole thing, not just part of it, it really doesn't make much sense to defret half a bass and leave the other half fretted.

If I were you I wouldn't spend the money on new pups, but maybe rewire it, get new pots and caps and a new jack, maybe even repaint and refinish it. Completely strip the bass and get some experience taking it apart and putting it all back together. That way if something happens to one of your other basses, you'll know how to fix it
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#6
Quote by Codytheicecube
I've recently decided to de-fret the bottom half of my first act bass for funsies and i was also tanking 'bout some new pick-ups so I wanted to see if my fellow bassers had an input that would be helpful.


Sounds lake an interesting experiment. However, unless I'm reading this wrong, you might want to do the defretting in the upper register; say above the D or E on the G string. You'll get that singing fretless mwah for soloing up high, while maintaining your intonation in the low end where the money notes reside.
Get ready for some string height shock on the fretless end.
#7
Quote by OtamotPuhctek
Sounds lake an interesting experiment. However, unless I'm reading this wrong, you might want to do the defretting in the upper register; say above the D or E on the G string. You'll get that singing fretless mwah for soloing up high, while maintaining your intonation in the low end where the money notes reside.
Get ready for some string height shock on the fretless end.


Well, were you defret the lower register of your instrument, you'd be making a really big mistake. For example, if you remove all the frets below the 7th fret, then you've essentially just created one massive fret that spans the width of 7; no matter where you fret below the 7th fret, you're still going to get the same note.

Defretting the higher register isn't actually a bad idea, because you as said, you'll get that nice mwah; the Fretless sound is generally better higher up, so it might work out. I'd generally recommend just defretting the whole thing though.
#8
i already have a fretless so im not gonna do the whole thing but i do think im gonna tune it up a couple steps if i can
#9
Quote by Tostitos
it really doesn't make much sense to defret half a bass and leave the other half fretted.

I agree with you whole heartetly. But the Ibanez Ashula would like a word with you.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#10
^ I meant if he defretted the upper or lower register (of all the strings). Defretting the lower half would create problems, as Ziphoblat has already gone over, and if you're defretting the upper half, you may as well do the whole thing.

The Ashula is a neat concept, but you couldn't pull the same thing off with a 4-string, again, you might as well defret the whole thing.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#11
Quote by Tostitos
^ I meant if he defretted the upper or lower register (of all the strings). Defretting the lower half would create problems, as Ziphoblat has already gone over, and if you're defretting the upper half, you may as well do the whole thing.

The Ashula is a neat concept, but you couldn't pull the same thing off with a 4-string, again, you might as well defret the whole thing.

I'm not too sure about that one, I imagine it'd be pretty doable, and I'd be surprised if no one had done it before, it would take a bit of effort setting up and some little improvisations, custom nut perhaps. the best way to do it would be to completely defret it and then refret it with shorter fretwire then fill in the left over bits.

I don't know about the Ashula being a neat concept, I have no idea what I'd do with it.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#12
Quote by consecutive e
I'm not too sure about that one, I imagine it'd be pretty doable, and I'd be surprised if no one had done it before

Oh you could defret the D and G string half of the fretboard, no problem, but you couldn't accomplish the Ashula tuning (EADGDG) without all 6 strings. I just don't see why someone would defret the D and G strings, and leave the E and A fretted, its easier to defret the whole deal.

As for the Ashula, I guess it gives you some variation? Either way, the price tag is a little high for something that seems pretty gimmicky.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#13
Quote by Tostitos
Oh you could defret the D and G string half of the fretboard, no problem, but you couldn't accomplish the Ashula tuning (EADGDG) without all 6 strings. I just don't see why someone would defret the D and G strings, and leave the E and A fretted, its easier to defret the whole deal.

As for the Ashula, I guess it gives you some variation? Either way, the price tag is a little high for something that seems pretty gimmicky.

Same reason as the Ashula I guess, just less of that variety, someone said something further up having the fretted low notes and then having fretlessness for soloing or whatever. It'd be cool if you could do it cheap and it'd be one of those things that you'd only break out for a couple of songs, I'd do it
I don't get the logic behind the tuning of the Ashula either. For $1800 AUD I think I'll pass anyway.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB