#1
At what point do you consider a band/musician to be "professional?" Is it when they perform to the extend to make it a full time job, whenever they are paid to perform, or is it something else?
#2
paid to preform technically. Some people say when it is your main source of income, but if someone works 2 "regular" jobs, they are professionals in each of those fields, no matter how much they make or how often they do one of the jobs. Musicians shuldn't be any different, in my opinion.
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#4
I'm with gaetch in saying that technically a "professional" is someone who is paid to use their skills. So a "professional musician" is someone who is paid to play music.

But that said, you can still employ a "professional" attitude in a band environment, even if you aren't being paid. I'd definately say that some bands I've played in have been less "professional" than others, regardless of being paid or not. I'm talking about not wasting time, learning your parts, showing up for practice etc.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
There is no standard that everyone would agree upon. To me, what a professional band should be and what they are, differ. To me a professional band should have their stuff down.

I equate professional sounding with - ready for prime time. If a band sounds like they are ready for prime time, take David Letterman's Late Night Band, clearly not just professional because they get paid, but because they sound like it. Every facet of the music is broken down and worked, from vocals, to musicianship to dynamics to the breadth and versatility of the musicians and styles. To me, thats a "pro" band. Throw anything at them, and they are good to go.

I get paid, and I will make money this weekend as the performer/singer/songwriter at the 25th anniversary of a local country club. But do I consider myself a professional? Not at all. I don't gig much (couple times a month, and reluctantly at that...they just keep waving money at me, sweetening the pot, and asking more than once). I dont have a backing band. If I had that, and I had us really tight, then maybe I would, but my standards of professional are very high, even for myself.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by Thejoker92
When someone you've never met wears your t shirts


Its not a good academic definition, but I like this one.

Basically, you're a pro when audience isnt your circle of friends and family and you get asked to play at places rather then having to beg to those places for it
#7
Quote by Sean0913
There is no standard that everyone would agree upon. To me, what a professional band should be and what they are, differ. To me a professional band should have their stuff down.

I equate professional sounding with - ready for prime time. If a band sounds like they are ready for prime time, take David Letterman's Late Night Band, clearly not just professional because they get paid, but because they sound like it. Every facet of the music is broken down and worked, from vocals, to musicianship to dynamics to the breadth and versatility of the musicians and styles. To me, thats a "pro" band. Throw anything at them, and they are good to go.



This x 100
#8
While it often sounds snobby, I refer to myself as a having professional gear and pro ability. Although i'm not a "professional musician", because I don't make enough money to support myself on playing music alone (not even close, lol)