#1
I have the basic concept down, but can somebody help further explain this to me?

There are a few things I'm confused about.

A P4 is 2 1/2 steps. Though, when counting, does it only matter how many letter names are apart? As in, if I count four letter names, will it always work out to be 2 1/2 steps?

For example. F G A B. Would the "B" have to be a "Bb?"

If it has to be a Bb, is there a trick to doing it fast without having to think? Originally, I would have to check myself by saying in my head, "F-G = 1, G-A = 2, A-B = 3...gotta make it flat to get rid of the extra half step."


Another thing I'm confused about...

Is it still considered a P4 if you have Eb to A#?

If so, this is another one I'd have to really think about to see if it evens out to 2 1/2 steps, and am wondering if there is a trick to it.


Thanks.
#2
Quote by OGHotWing
I have the basic concept down, but can somebody help further explain this to me?

There are a few things I'm confused about.

A P4 is 2 1/2 steps. Though, when counting, does it only matter how many letter names are apart? As in, if I count four letter names, will it always work out to be 2 1/2 steps?

For example. F G A B. Would the "B" have to be a "Bb?"

If it has to be a Bb, is there a trick to doing it fast without having to think? Originally, I would have to check myself by saying in my head, "F-G = 1, G-A = 2, A-B = 3...gotta make it flat to get rid of the extra half step."


Another thing I'm confused about...

Is it still considered a P4 if you have Eb to A#?

If so, this is another one I'd have to really think about to see if it evens out to 2 1/2 steps, and am wondering if there is a trick to it.


Thanks.


For F - the answer is yes, it HAS to be a Bb.

Eb - to Ab is a perfect 4th, not A#. You're on the right track though. Keep it up.

Best,

Sean
#3
A P4 is the fret above the root on all strings except between the G and B strings.

E|-------------------------3 (G)--------------------
B|-------------------------3 (D)-----6 (F)---------
G|----------5 (C)--------------------5 (C)---------
D|----------5 (G)---------------------------- 0 (D)
A|1 (Bb)------------------------------------- 0 (A)
E|1 (F)---------------------------------------------

Sound knowledge of the fretboard will enable you to think quickly.



Practice writing out scales too, it'll help you remember it all better
Last edited by Calibos at Sep 17, 2010,
#4
If it's in the major key of the lower tone, then it's always a perfect (unison, fourth, fifth, octave) or major (remaining intervals). So in Eb, for instance, we have Bb, Eb, Ab so perfect fourth must be Ab.
[edit] The trick to be really killer fast is to memorize intervals for every two notes. There isn't that many.
Last edited by KingStill at Sep 17, 2010,
#5
Quote by OGHotWing
Is it still considered a P4 if you have Eb to A#?


That's a doubly augmented fourth. Covering letter names only gives you a generic interval (E-anything up to the next A-anything is going to be some kind of fourth). The actual "distance" covered by those four letter names determines the exact type of fourth it is (seven semitones in this case, up two from a perfect fourth, so it's been augmented twice over).
#6
Quote by OGHotWing
I have the basic concept down, but can somebody help further explain this to me?

There are a few things I'm confused about.

A P4 is 2 1/2 steps. Though, when counting, does it only matter how many letter names are apart? As in, if I count four letter names, will it always work out to be 2 1/2 steps?

For example. F G A B. Would the "B" have to be a "Bb?"
Nope. F to B is a fourth just like F to Bb. The difference is that one is a perfect fourth, and the other is an augmented fourth. A perfect fourth is an interval of 5 half-steps. An augmented fourth is an interval of 6 half-steps.

Quote by OGHotWing
If it has to be a Bb, is there a trick to doing it fast without having to think? Originally, I would have to check myself by saying in my head, "F-G = 1, G-A = 2, A-B = 3...gotta make it flat to get rid of the extra half step."
Simple recognition, that's the trick. The more you become familiar with the following little chart thing, the better:

In C:
0 - Perfect unison (C)
1 - Minor second (Db)
2 - Major second (D)
3 - Minor third (Eb)
4 - Major third (E)
5 - Perfect fourth (F)
6 - Augmented fourth/diminished fifth (F#/Gb)
7 - Perfect fifth (G)
8 - Minor sixth (Ab)
9 - Major sixth (A)
10 - Minor seventh (Bb)
11 - Major seventh (B)
And then of course the pattern begins again at the perfect unison (or octave if you keep going up).

Quote by OGHotWing
Another thing I'm confused about...

Is it still considered a P4 if you have Eb to A#?

If so, this is another one I'd have to really think about to see if it evens out to 2 1/2 steps, and am wondering if there is a trick to it.
The trick here is to first identify what number the interval is. You know that a type of E to a type of A is a type of fourth. But then you count the steps/half-steps and it turns out to have two extra half-steps than a perfect fourth. Whenever you raise a perfect interval it becomes augmented, and whenever you raise it a second time, it becomes doubly augmented. So this is a doubly augmented fourth.

The way I see this is that I know E to a is a perfect fourth and I know that the bottom note is a half-step lower (which augments the fourth once) and the top note is a half-step higher (which augments it again). That's my thought process. You can also say that a perfect fourth from Eb is Ab, and A# is two half-steps up, thus doubly augmenting the interval. This is probably more effective.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea