#1
my hobby is recording and mixing local bands for fun.. however i've never done anything really heavey.. and just last time this band contacted me and we arranged a date. they said they wanted guitars to sound like this; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cpKat5fiyM
since i only play non heavey stuff and only own single coil guitars i cannot experiment and see how to get this sound.. though i am pretty expirienced in mixing i cannot guarantee i'll be able to get this guitars sounding like this... so i was thinking you guys could help me out...
first off;
guitars are supposed to be recorded with a mid - quality bc rich beast withactive emgs installed...
the amp they are going to use is Marshall valvestate 8100 using a marshall or crate 4/12 cabinet.

now i know that this combination can be pretty heavey with gain all the way up when playing rehearsing..
but with recording it's not the same thing..
say i want to close mic up the cab using sm 57... on amp; i would boost the treble to say 3o clock, mids to 11 and bass to say 4 o'clock... gain would be almost all the way up...

then on DAW eq i'd bring up the "pressence" frequencies (about 2khz), make a low cut at like 40hz and perhaps bring the body (200 - 600hz) down just a little)


so far my theories have worked for me.. but like i said it's my first time in this area, so be gentle ...

i was thinking of adding a compressor before the daw eq aswell..
any advice, critics, corrections, whatever would be great.. seriously ug i need your help, i dont want to face those guys unprepared

cheers ug and thx in advice
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#2
This should really be in the recording section, but I'll say a couple of things.

When recording, you often don't need as much gain as you'd expect, especially as you normally double track (and pan L and R) to get the sound as full as possible. Also, I doubt you'll need any compression, that kind of heavy sound is incredibly compressed as it it.
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#3
first off;
guitars are supposed to be recorded with a mid - quality bc rich beast withactive emgs installed...


Good thing they already have active EMG's, because those are pretty much mandatory for a sound like that.

the amp they are going to use is Marshall valvestate 8100 using a marshall or crate 4/12 cabinet.


This is not such a great thing. Something like a Peavy 5150 or 6505 is a much better starting point for getting such a sound. Going with a valvestate.. I dunno.. I guess you could do it with a lot of tweaking and working it on the DAW, it's just a kinda crappy starting position.

Protip: I recomend you record the dry signal of the guitar before it hits the monitor / amp if you dont already. You can either do this with a spliter, or just put your DAW in between.
Don't worry how the amp sounds, it's just there for monitoring purposes, IE getting a high gain sound from the monitor so the dynamics and feeling are correct.

After you get the signal, you can feed it into the input of all kinds of amps later, and capture the mic'ed output from there. You can even layer a track using different amps!

If this isnt already your method, get it down this way! I can promise you that it will save halve your time recording, and the mixing / producing results will also be much better then live recording from an amp.

i was thinking of adding a compressor before the daw eq aswell..
any advice, critics, corrections, whatever would be great.. seriously ug i need your help, i dont want to face those guys unprepared


That is pretty much mandatory. The sound of that clip is that aggresive yet clear style. Too much gain will mush the notes up, you actualy need quite a bit of compression instead. If you cant get to that level without making the compression killing the dynamics, you need to look if you should layer (some more).


now i know that this combination can be pretty heavey with gain all the way up when playing rehearsing..
but with recording it's not the same thing..


heavy doesnt mean that it should sound garbage with too much gain or all the mids cut out

say i want to close mic up the cab using sm 57... on amp; i would boost the treble to say 3o clock, mids to 11 and bass to say 4 o'clock... gain would be almost all the way up...

then on DAW eq i'd bring up the "pressence" frequencies (about 2khz), make a low cut at like 40hz and perhaps bring the body (200 - 600hz) down just a little)


Well, like I wrote earlier, record the raw signal that directly comes out of the guitar cable *before* you you tweak any knobs or settings. Otherwise, you have to re-record everytime you think the sound should be a bit different, and unless the takes are always good on the try, that is going to be a *lot* of takes. Unless it's an accoustic instrument or vocals, you should only need to to have as many takes as it need to be played right. Getting it to sound right comes after you get the good track.
#4
Are you recording digitally to your computer? If so, record what you can and then possibly manipulate it later. There are some free amp simulator effects out there, and you can tweak the sound using these. One includes:

http://www.acmebargig.com/red-shift/

Hope that helps... maybe not :-)
#5
Says in the description "Pod X3" so i'm assuming he's just running through that directly into the computer? They have many "metal" presets on them.
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