#1
Hey UG...

So I have a Parker P-44, which is 25.5" scale length and with 9 gauge strings. It plays very well, but one day in between some classes I went to guitar center and played some strats. I played an American standard and Mexican standard. Both played amazingly well... the strings felt so soft and easy to bend a few steps up. Same strings, same scale length. Why do the strings on my Parker (and many other guitars I've played) feel so rigid and are so hard to bend, while on these strats the strings feel like butter?

Thanks!
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#2
Quote by Chris Schementi
Hey UG...

So I have a Parker P-44, which is 25.5" scale length and with 9 gauge strings. It plays very well, but one day in between some classes I went to guitar center and played some strats. I played an American standard and Mexican standard. Both played amazingly well... the strings felt so soft and easy to bend a few steps up. Same strings, same scale length. Why do the strings on my Parker (and many other guitars I've played) feel so rigid and are so hard to bend, while on these strats the strings feel like butter?

Thanks!


The scale length may be the same. I suggest you measure the distance between the nut and the bridge of your guitar and the same on the Strat. Strats are very small sized as compared to an LP or any Superstrat. Less length= less tension.
#3
many factors are there besides gauge mate.

-type of string core, (hex or round)(steel, brass, or cotton/nylon <-- ive found some b4 i swear it.)
-type of metal of the strings
-size of the core
-size of the outer winding
-compression of the strings windings (how much was it compressed b4 wound)

sooooo many factors mate!
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#4
Quote by Deadlock Riff
many factors are there besides gauge mate.

-type of string core, (hex or round)(steel, brass, or cotton/nylon <-- ive found some b4 i swear it.)
-type of metal of the strings
-size of the core
-size of the outer winding
-compression of the strings windings (how much was it compressed b4 wound)

sooooo many factors mate!


Yeah I know what you mean, but the strings I use on my guitar can't be much different from the strings on a strat at Guitar Center. I'm not literally asking for soft strings I'm asking how to set up my guitar to get that low tension that the strats had.
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#5
They could have been in a different tuning (under less tension), but i guess you would've noticed if they were
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#7
Quote by GS LEAD 5
The scale length may be the same. I suggest you measure the distance between the nut and the bridge of your guitar and the same on the Strat. Strats are very small sized as compared to an LP or any Superstrat. Less length= less tension.


Wow, so wrong. Stratocasters are longer than Les Pauls—Strats have a 25.5" scale length while Les Pauls and similar guitars have 24.75" scale length. Most PRS guitars have a 25" scale length. So yes, while shorter lengths provide less tension, strats will generally have a longer scale length than LPs. Mama always told me not to believe everything I saw on the internet...

The fretboard wood might have something to do with how easily strings bend and there's always the chance that the strings aren't exactly the same.
#8
I'm guessing the C shape neck gave you better leverage/position to bend.
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#9
I also think it's because of the fret size. I have medium fret while the strats have larger frets. Plus the strats I played have maple fingerboards, and i have ebony. Truth is, the strat played and sounded so well i really want one now lol
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#10
I could be wrong, but I think what's going on here is the insanely low action all of the guitars at GC have. I don't know why they do it, but on all of their guitars the action is like resting on the frets.

If your action is higher, then it will be harder to bend proportionate to the amount higher it is. The lower your action is, the easier it will be to bend. I don't think fret size has anything to do with it.
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#11
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Strats are very small sized as compared to an LP or any Superstrat. Less length= less tension.




Please don't give advice if you clearly have no idea what your talking about.
#12
Quote by Offworld92
I could be wrong, but I think what's going on here is the insanely low action all of the guitars at GC have. I don't know why they do it, but on all of their guitars the action is like resting on the frets.

If your action is higher, then it will be harder to bend proportionate to the amount higher it is. The lower your action is, the easier it will be to bend. I don't think fret size has anything to do with it.


Actually all of the strats and teles had much higher action than my guitar. But you're right about the other guitars like RG's they put the action so low haha
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#13
Quote by irollemphat
Wow, so wrong. Stratocasters are longer than Les Pauls—Strats have a 25.5" scale length while Les Pauls and similar guitars have 24.75" scale length. Most PRS guitars have a 25" scale length. So yes, while shorter lengths provide less tension, strats will generally have a longer scale length than LPs. Mama always told me not to believe everything I saw on the internet...

The fretboard wood might have something to do with how easily strings bend and there's always the chance that the strings aren't exactly the same.

Mama should have told you to read posts from beginning to end. Read what I said carefully please.

NOT the scale. The area betwen the neck and the bridge. The place where you pick. How else do you explain the fact that my LTD is at elast 3 inches longer from bridge to nut than a strat?


Take a tape measure and measure from nut to bridge. The average RG will be at least 2-3 inches longer than a typical strat.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Sep 17, 2010,
#14
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Mama should have told you to read posts from beginning to end. Read what I said carefully please.

NOT the scale. The area betwen the neck and the bridge. The place where you pick. How else do you explain the fact that my LTD is at elast 3 inches longer from bridge to nut than a strat?


Take a tape measure and measure from nut to bridge. The average RG will be at least 2-3 inches longer than a typical strat.

You clearly have no idea. Your guitar, Strats, and RGs all have 25.5" scales. The bolded part is irrelevant.
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#15
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
You clearly have no idea. Your guitar, Strats, and RGs all have 25.5" scales. The bolded part is irrelevant.


(sigh) MEASURE FROM THE NUT TO THE BRIDGE WILL YA?????

From Wikipedia:

Frets are laid out to a mathematical ratio that results in equal tempered division of the octave. The ratio of the spacing of two consecutive frets is the twelfth root of two. The twelfth fret divides the scale length in two exact halves and the 24th fret position divides the scale length in half yet again. Every twelve frets represents one octave. In practice, luthiers determine fret positions using the constant 17.817, which is derived from the twelfth root of two (17.817 = (1-2-1/12)−1). The scale length divided by this value yields the distance from the nut to the first fret. That distance is subtracted from the scale length and the result is divided in two sections by the constant to yield the distance from the first fret to the second fret. Positions for the remainder of the frets are calculated in like manner.[17] Actual fret spacing does not use this exact value; the fret spacing on the fretboard was also done by trial and error (testing) method over the ages.

If a Strat is the same size overall as my LTD, how come my LTD's 25.5 scale has 24 frets, whereas most strats come with 21? And how come the LT EC has 24 frets even though its a 24.75 scale, whereas LP's have 22?

EDIT: http://www.stewmac.com/fretscales
Read that.

EDIT2: No wait......(thinks) Now I'm even mroe confused.....if the scale is measured from nut to bridge, how do you explain ^?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Sep 17, 2010,
#16
Quote by GS LEAD 5
(sigh) MEASURE FROM THE NUT TO THE BRIDGE WILL YA?????

From Wikipedia:

Frets are laid out to a mathematical ratio that results in equal tempered division of the octave. The ratio of the spacing of two consecutive frets is the twelfth root of two. The twelfth fret divides the scale length in two exact halves and the 24th fret position divides the scale length in half yet again. Every twelve frets represents one octave. In practice, luthiers determine fret positions using the constant 17.817, which is derived from the twelfth root of two (17.817 = (1-2-1/12)−1). The scale length divided by this value yields the distance from the nut to the first fret. That distance is subtracted from the scale length and the result is divided in two sections by the constant to yield the distance from the first fret to the second fret. Positions for the remainder of the frets are calculated in like manner.[17] Actual fret spacing does not use this exact value; the fret spacing on the fretboard was also done by trial and error (testing) method over the ages.

If a Strat is the same size overall as my LTD, how come my LTD's 25.5 scale has 24 frets, whereas most strats come with 21? And how come the LT EC has 24 frets even though its a 24.75 scale, whereas LP's have 22?

EDIT: http://www.stewmac.com/fretscales
Read that.

EDIT2: No wait......(thinks) Now I'm even mroe confused.....if the scale is measured from nut to bridge, how do you explain ^?

Because the fretboard is longer. The neck pickup gets pushed closer to the bridge so the fretboard can be extended.

Your guitar:


A Fender Standard Strat:


A typical RG:


They have the same scale length.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Sep 17, 2010,
#17
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Because your frets are closer together.

Your guitar:


A Fender Standard Strat:


A typical RG:


They have the same scale length.


But what about the wiki article saying that fret size was proportional to scale length in my previous post?

EDIT: That's one horrible looking RG.....(averts eyes in shame).
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Sep 17, 2010,
#18
Quote by GS LEAD 5
But what about the wiki article saying that fret size was proportional to scale length in my previous post?

I misspoke on my first sentence. I edited it for clarity.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#20
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Now I comprehend.

Mersi'.

Then I recommend that you admit your mistake to irollemphat.

(Also, it's merci.)

Edit -

Also:
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Lower strings are harder to bend than higher ones btw.

You have got to be trolling. Lower tunings are easier to bend (assuming no change in gauge) because they have lower tension. That's why they're lower.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Sep 17, 2010,
#21
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Then I recommend that you admit your mistake to irollemphat.

(Also, it's merci.)

Edit -

Also:

You have got to be trolling. Lower tunings are easier to bend (assuming no change in gauge) because they have lower tension. That's why they're lower.



I admit. I was wrong.
(bows)

BTW that was a mistake. Should be the other way round. I can do a wicked vibrato on my LTD. I can barely fret a note properly on my acoustic. Guess thats why I have given it to a friend till her gets a bass......
#22
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Then I recommend that you admit your mistake to irollemphat.


Thanks, but not really necessary. Not looking for props or anything, just trying to be helpful. I know I'm right
#23
I will bet it is the bridge that causes the Blender to feel "softer". If the trem is set to float with 3 springs you can hit the low E bend the A string and it will drop in pitch. I love this but it causes the strings to feel like mush compared to a fixed bridge.
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#24
Quote by Bhaok
I will bet it is the bridge that causes the Blender to feel "softer". If the trem is set to float with 3 springs you can hit the low E bend the A string and it will drop in pitch. I love this but it causes the strings to feel like mush compared to a fixed bridge.


Eh?
Gotta try that out.......