#1
I've started to work on developing a practice schedule. Firstly, I need some opinions on what I've gotten done so far:

Warm up: 5-10 minutes
Scales: 15 minutes
Arpeggios: 15 minutes
Chords: 15 minutes
Theory: 10 minutes
Technique: 20 minutes
Fretboard Memorisation: 10 minutes
New Cover Song: 10 Minutes
Reading Music: 10 minutes
Ear Training: 15 minutes


I have that so far, and I will also work one out for what I'm going to be working on every day. It is also likely to change as my goals change.

Secondly, while developing this schedule, I've realised how little I know about alot of theory. By that, I mean I know basically nothing. I understand about how chords are formed, intervals and stuff like that, but I know basically nothing about scales and modes etc.
Can some explain these briefly to me, and tell me where I would be able to get some more in depth stuff on them. Specifically, what I should know/learn for metal (mostly thrash), hard and classic rock, a wee bit of country, and even a touch of classical.

Thirdly, what techniques would I need, mostly for thrash metal. I already have thought of:

down-picking
alt picking
sweep picking
string skipping
tapping

Is there any that I have missed and should know.
Also, I don't actually know what string skipping is I've heard/read people talking about it, and that it is used alot in metal, but I don't know what it is. Can some one tell me that please?


All this help would be very, very much appreciated.
Thank you.
#2
Looking at your schedule, I think you're going to find it hard to maintain that and still learn anything. You have so little time devoted to any one particular topic. As a guitar instructor, my advice would be to spend a lot more time on some of those topics.
#3
Holy crap you're a lot more organized than I am, as for the question about theory - have you checked out the threads in the musicians talk section? VERY very useful. You seem on the right track to becoming a kick ass guitarist, the only thing I can think of that you didn't mention was using a metronome, that's always something a musician can use.

Damn, you kinda just motivated me to be a little more organized and thoughtful about how I use my practice time so thanks a bunch haha
#4
Quote by KG6_Steven
Looking at your schedule, I think you're going to find it hard to maintain that and still learn anything. You have so little time devoted to any one particular topic. As a guitar instructor, my advice would be to spend a lot more time on some of those topics.

You're right on the money..
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Move along.

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Quote by steve_muse
^lol'd at the sig, adj209
#5
A lot of those things you can practice just by playing songs you like, such as chords, scales, technique could be used by playing certain songs. Also by playing songs you improve timing etc. Practice doesn't need to be sterile, and we're all doing this to make nice music with our guitars, so why not play some? Also, try not to bite off more than you can chew at once, thats a lot of stuff you're trying to learn at the same time.

Just my opinion, but I hope it is of some use to you.

Paul
Last edited by NorthernPaul at Sep 17, 2010,
#6
Quote by KG6_Steven
Looking at your schedule, I think you're going to find it hard to maintain that and still learn anything. You have so little time devoted to any one particular topic. As a guitar instructor, my advice would be to spend a lot more time on some of those topics.


That schedule was developed following very similarly to one another guitar teacher showed me, I really just made some parts longer and played about with the timing. Even still, feedback is appreciated, and if what I have doesn't work out for me, I'll try it your way

Quote by LightxGrenade
Holy crap you're a lot more organized than I am, as for the question about theory - have you checked out the threads in the musicians talk section? VERY very useful. You seem on the right track to becoming a kick ass guitarist, the only thing I can think of that you didn't mention was using a metronome, that's always something a musician can use.

Damn, you kinda just motivated me to be a little more organized and thoughtful about how I use my practice time so thanks a bunch haha


I haven't even thought of checking musicians talk lol. I'll make sure to check in there.
I completely forgot about the metronome, but ya, pretty much every thing will be done to a metronome, or at least a drum track.
#7
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#8
Quote by NorthernPaul
A lot of those things you can practice just by playing songs you like, such as chords, scales, technique could be used by playing certain songs. Also by playing songs you improve timing etc. Practice doesn't need to be sterile, and we're all doing this to make nice music with our guitars, so why not play some? Also, try not to bite off more than you can chew at once, thats a lot of stuff you're trying to learn at the same time.

Just my opinion, but I hope it is of some use to you.

Paul


I'll second this.

The only thing I've ever really sat down and dedicated time to was memorizing scale shapes and notes on the fretboard. Everything else will come just through actually learning songs (like timing, chord shapes, technique, & ear training), and studying the theory behind why they sound good to you.

I think many people burn themselves out by turning something that should be fun into something so scheduled and organized...it makes it seem more like work. If it works for you, more power to you, but I would rather be playing songs than spending hours running through boring exercises.
#9
I'd say also add a little time at the end to just muck around/improvise with some riffs and whatnot, not worrying about whether it's the 'right' chords, scales etc. Just a few minutes of fun can turn an otherwise grinding practice session around. That's what I found anyway.
#10
Try using single string concepts in your lead and legato playing. For example play your scales on a single string, instead of across separate strings. It's also how Joe Satriani learned to play scales. True story.
#11
You'd best be doing spider excercises with a metronome. Also if you want to learn about modes try this:-
Learn one scale (e.g Phrygian)
Practice for a week or two (use a metronome to practice timing and devolop picking rythms)
Play along with some backing tracks and improvise
Rinse and Repeat

Works for me but everyone learns differently, have fun
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