#1
Hey guys,
I'm basically wondering if flatwounds would be a good choice for me, but here are my specifics:
I play bass in a trad doom band but am hoping to start my own, thrashier deathy stoner/doom kinda band soon and have been using Elixirs since I bought two Ibanezes with them on (just swapping like for like) and I tried Ernie balls once and thought they were crap.
I'm considering flatwounds because I simply can't afford to kep replacing my strings as much as I would like to with rounds and I've heard that flats sound similar but better than dead rounds and that you don't need to replace flats as much if at all.
I'm not really explaining myself that well, but what would you guys recommend I do?
And if you think I should get flats, what would you recommend for a good 5 string set in standard and a 4 string set to tune to C#?
Thanks.
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#2
The only flatwound player that I know of who comes even close to the genres you've listed is Steve Harris of Iron Maiden. Most bassists who play aggressive music just don't go for flatwounds. Their mellower tone doesn't cut it for them. Whether older flatwounds would sound better than older roundwounds is a subjective thing: the only way to be sure is to try a set and see if you like them over time.

As for which flatwounds to get, you might as well go with Mr. Harris' signature set:

http://www.rotosound.com/sh77.html
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
Yeah, I like his tone but I always wonder why other people don't seem to do that too with flats. I'm actually going to buy a set of those and try them out because they are exactly the gauge I wanted.
Also, is it true that you don't need to change flats unless you break one?
Quote by UraniYum
Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#4
Flatwounds will last longer but they will still start losing tune/intonation after a while.

I really wouldn't recommend flats for metal. The only reason Steve Harris cuts through the mix is because the guitars are so shrill (and he plucks the strings with the fury of Satan himself.)

Get some coated steel strings, they'll last just as long as flatwounds if you get a good brand (i.e. Warwick, not Elixir.)
#5
Yes, go for decent coated rounds instead. I'm using the Warwick EMPS at the moment, and they have really lasted a long time. Still pretty damn bright and I've had them about 6 weeks now.
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#6
Also, tips for string longevity:

Wash your hands before playing and don't let your hands get sweaty.
Boiling strings works but I find soaking them in meths works much better. (Not for coated strings.)
Buy some Fastfrets and use it all the time.
#7
Quote by gilly_90
Is it true that you don't need to change flats unless you break one?


Well, Joe Osborn kept a set of flats on his Fender Jazz (the first one ever made, I believe) for at least thirty years and changed them only because he had to. James Jamerson kept a set of LaBella flats on his Fender Precision for several years until one broke; at which point he called the LaBella factory and asked if they could weld it back together (they couldn't do it). So if you like the tone of the flatwounds even after the frets and the oils and friction from your fingers have had their way with them, then you can keep them on until they break. That should take a very long time.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#8
I love my flats. GHS stainless steel flatwounds. I think flats might help you cut through the mix a bit better since your not fighting for the same frequencies (in theory)
give them a shot and see how they sound.