#1
Alright, most of the time I use horizontal to fretboard vibrato, which means my fingers don't move up and down like small bends, but rather right and left, is that good or bad?

Sometimes I use up and down vibrato, which seems harder to me and less effective.

Tips? and what's right what's wrong
#2
Moving left to right is surely having no effect whatsoever?
(I'm assuming you're not using a fretless here)

By moving left to right within the same fret isnt really doing anything, as the point of contact on the string with the fret remains the same. Up and down is much harder, yes, and takes years to perfect, but its the only real way on a fretted instrument to perform a vibrato.
#3
I use a mix of both (How the **** do you do up and down on high E? ) But up and down does make a much larger effect, and its the way you should learn to do it.
la de da.
#4
That technique is good for the 1st and 6th strings, but I'd recommend trying the pivot technique on the other strings, which will give you that up and down vibrato. The point between your thumb and index finger is the point where your hand touches the bottom of the guitar. Use this point as a pivot. As you pivot around this point, your finger will move up and down and you'll have good vibrato.

Just make sure you learn when to use fast and slow vibrato. Some people have only one speed - fast. Learn to use slow vibrato, too.
#5
Quote by mishax92
Moving left to right is surely having no effect whatsoever?
(I'm assuming you're not using a fretless here)



^That's not true. A horizontal motion does create a sense of vibrato especially on the lower strings. This is a technique much favoured by classical players as it's quite subtle. The vertical vibrato is a more dramatical effect and typically favoured by blues/rock players.

Answer to the OP: The two types of vibrato simply produce different sounds. As with all techniques is best to know how to do both.
Guthrie Govan = Guitar Genius
#6
Horizontal vibrato does have an effect.... I don't know how or why but it does...
I just use Horizontal vibrato when the string that should be vibrated isn't bent, but if there is a bend I use vertical (up and down) because it's much easier....
#7
While what you say is true, try using the vertical technique on the high and low E. It don't work so well. The only way to use vibrato on those strings is the horizontal method. It makes sure the string stays on the fret and doesn't slip off. When the string slips off, it sounds like crap.
#8
I usually do horizontal vibrato - mainly because I pretty much hate that over-the-top rock vibrato that gets used way too much.

And it works because you're affectively changing the amount of tension you're putting on the string. It's the same concept as how hard you press makes a difference.
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
That technique is good for the 1st and 6th strings, but I'd recommend trying the pivot technique on the other strings, which will give you that up and down vibrato. The point between your thumb and index finger is the point where your hand touches the bottom of the guitar. Use this point as a pivot. As you pivot around this point, your finger will move up and down and you'll have good vibrato.

Just make sure you learn when to use fast and slow vibrato. Some people have only one speed - fast. Learn to use slow vibrato, too.


My thumb is usually not touching or holding the back of the fretboard, my hands are really free. And actually the uber fast one finger vibrato is what got me into up and down stuff.


My horizontal vibrato, is actually VERY effective on both fast and slow stuff, but it can't go as fast as the up and down one, which I can't do.
Last edited by Zeletros at Sep 18, 2010,
#10
.. Wow, I'm the complete opposite. My "up down" vibrato is pretty good, but when I attempt the left right way, it really bugs my left elbow. I found the up down way much easier and effective, even though I thought that the left right way was the "proper" way to do it.

R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
#11
Quote by R0B0_Ninja
^That's not true. A horizontal motion does create a sense of vibrato especially on the lower strings. This is a technique much favoured by classical players as it's quite subtle. The vertical vibrato is a more dramatical effect and typically favoured by blues/rock players.

Answer to the OP: The two types of vibrato simply produce different sounds. As with all techniques is best to know how to do both.


You pretty much nailed it, and FREAKING AWESOME AVATAR!
I'm up for building you a pedal.
(Or modding nearly anything moddable)
(PM Me.)
#12
Quote by Zeletros
Alright, most of the time I use horizontal to fretboard vibrato, which means my fingers don't move up and down like small bends, but rather right and left, is that good or bad?

Sometimes I use up and down vibrato, which seems harder to me and less effective.

Tips? and what's right what's wrong


Horizontal vibrato is not bad. You tend to see it used predominantly by clasically trained guitarists.

Violionists use it almost exclusively. It works better for them because their instrument doesn't have any frets, so horizontal movements result in strong vibrato.

If up-and-down vibrato seems harder and less effective it simply means you haven't used it enough. Use it more and it will become more natural and a lot more effective.
#13
Quote by KG6_Steven
While what you say is true, try using the vertical technique on the high and low E. It don't work so well. The only way to use vibrato on those strings is the horizontal method. It makes sure the string stays on the fret and doesn't slip off. When the string slips off, it sounds like crap.


Another false. Vertical absolutely works on the high E, you just can't pull down on the string, you can only go up. Yes, this is still "vertical."

Bullshit? I do it everyday, liberally.