#1
When I'm recording some thing, what should I double track. Right now I'm doing it on the guitars, and I'm assuming I should double track the bass as well. What about the drums and vocals, should I double track them as well?
I also like to use a bit of violin in some of my stuff, should I double track it as well?
#2
You don't have to double track everything. Just the parts you think need more depth. Usually you'll just double track guitars and vocals though.
#4
Double tracking is where you record the same part twice. Usually you pan the sounds either side to thicken it up.
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#5
Don't double track bass or drums. If drums need anything really done to them, people use triggers (or if you're already using MIDI, just go from there). The thicker the low end, the muddier it will be. Guitars are double tracked 9 times out of 10 these days, as are vocals, and add a very slight amount of chorus to each one.
Then in the mastering (EQ wise) boost the high-mid range frequencies ever so slightly more than you would normally to make the sound a bit more crisp.
#6
Would you then record it twice, or make a copy of your guitar and have one panned to the left and the other to the right? perhaps one in the middle too?
#7
Quote by Tim the Rocker
Would you then record it twice, or make a copy of your guitar and have one panned to the left and the other to the right? perhaps one in the middle too?


It's completely up to you. I usually record a part twice (or 4 times, 2 for each side) but sometimes you can get away with just doing 1 take. Again, it's completely up to you, pan the tracks so it sounds good to you.
#8
Just the guitar and vocals then? Thanks.

Am I right in assuming I put the drums and bass straight up the middle?
#9
Quote by robhc
Just the guitar and vocals then? Thanks.

Am I right in assuming I put the drums and bass straight up the middle?


Yup, you'll usually want the more bassy instruments in the center along with the important ones.
#10
Well with the bass, I would leave it in the middle.
The drums are another story. Yes, you would want to leave the bass drum and snare in the middle. However, you kind of want to pan the individual toms and cymbals according to the position they are when recording. Say the floor tom is the farthest drum to your right. Then pan that tom all the way to the right.
That's what I would do, however, it is completely up to you.
#11
Quote by maggot9779
It's completely up to you. I usually record a part twice (or 4 times, 2 for each side) but sometimes you can get away with just doing 1 take. Again, it's completely up to you, pan the tracks so it sounds good to you.


I record 2 parts, pan one 65 left and one 65 right then copypasta each one, half the volume and pan it slightly closer to centre...say...40. Really brings out the depth and gives the stereo field more clarity.
(random numbers there just to illustrate. choose whatever works for your piece)
#12
I usually quad track.

Rhythm Guitar 1 - R100
Rhythm Guitar 2 (same as RG1) - L75
Rhythm Guitar 3 - L100
Rhythm Guitar 4 (same as RG2) - R75

So it sounds central but with a a little bit of pan from the extra tracked guitars. If i were to double track (for faster stuff, harder to quad track) i'd normally have them hard panned (maybe 98). All separate takes of course.

Just food for thought.
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Sep 18, 2010,
#13
Quote by Tim the Rocker
Would you then record it twice, or make a copy of your guitar and have one panned to the left and the other to the right? perhaps one in the middle too?

copy and pasting is pretty much a waste of time, it doesnt really anything to the overall sound. double tracking means you are recording the part twice.


bass goes straight up the middle, as do drums, so you dont need to double track them. i dont do vocals either, but if you are a good singer and can get two takes that are spot on, go for it.
#14
Quote by jof1029
copy and pasting is pretty much a waste of time, it doesnt really anything to the overall sound. double tracking means you are recording the part twice.


bass goes straight up the middle, as do drums, so you dont need to double track them. i dont do vocals either, but if you are a good singer and can get two takes that are spot on, go for it.


Copying the exact same part just ups the volume. f you have to copy it then use different amps or different EQ for each one.
#15
Just popped in here, feel like maybe the separate takes thing needs some clarifying.

By copying a take and panning one copy to the left and one to the right, it's still the exact same sound in both sides, only making it louder if anything. However, there will always be slight inconsistencies every time you play a part, even if each time sounds perfect. Because of this, doing two takes will blend those unique sounds together to create a guitar sound with more depth. That's the most efficient way to explain it I can think of, anyone else can add onto it with anything I may have left out.
#16
I think the best advice here is to listen to some music, and pay attention to where everything is and how everything sounds. If you're really listening for it you'll begin to notice where things are placed in the stereo mix.
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#17
Double tracked vocals are for weak vocalists, tbh

I only like to double (well, quad) distorted guitars. I do to heavily distorted tracks to 100L and 100R and then two lighter distorted tracks to 70L and 70R

If you just copy and paste to 100L and 100R, they'll cancel each other out and it'll sound like one centered track. Don't be lazy
#18
Overall you'll never double track drums or bass. Vocals depends on the style and the intonation of the vocalist (double tracking tends to even out pitch inconsistencies). Guitars can be double- and triple-tracked as much as the "audio real estate" allows. Make sure you use slightly different sounds for each track though, otherwise you'll usually end up with mush.

Quote by robhc
Am I right in assuming I put the drums and bass straight up the middle?


There are really no rules when it comes to panning (just check the wickedly panned snare on one of the tracks on Regina Spektor's latest) but most of the time that would be the case. If you're going for a trio format then you might want to pan the bass and guitars to either side, but not too much, and use some nice reverb as a buss effect and pan that the other way to create width. Generally speaking pop/rock/metal records tend to have the rhythm section straight up the middle along with lead vocals. Then again, if you're going for an early 60's vibe you'd pan very differently.
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#19
Quote by xFilth
Double tracked vocals are for weak vocalists, tbh


I am inclined to disagree. Double tracking can create some great effects. Two quite different takes mixed can sound really good. Not 'natural' by any means, but a good effect nonetheless.

And then there is the opposite end of the spectrum, vocalists so tight that you'd swear it was just one take.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fewnnTuhUIo&p=A5FBA19FE7EBBB51&playnext=1&index=35

^4:16
I had no idea that was double tracked until I heard this. And I'm sure you wouldn't call Freddie Mercury a weak singer.

Of course it can help cover pitch issues and such, but that is not its only use.
"Music snobbery is the worst kind of snobbery. 'Oh, you like those noises? Those sounds in your ear? Do you like them? They're the wrong sounds. You should like these sounds in your ear.'"
- Dara O'Briain
#20
Quote by -Blue-
Just popped in here, feel like maybe the separate takes thing needs some clarifying.

By copying a take and panning one copy to the left and one to the right, it's still the exact same sound in both sides, only making it louder if anything. However, there will always be slight inconsistencies every time you play a part, even if each time sounds perfect. Because of this, doing two takes will blend those unique sounds together to create a guitar sound with more depth. That's the most efficient way to explain it I can think of, anyone else can add onto it with anything I may have left out.


This...There are 2 main components to double tracking guitars:
1) Slight inconsistencies in playing creates a more authentic, deeper sound.
2) Slight differences in tone cause the two guitars (when panned to each side) to clash against each other a little bit, also creating a more full sound. Some people just EQ each differently with a plug-in, but the better idea is to tweak your mid and treble settngs on your amp, so one guitar is more high end and one is less. Then, EQ them the same, so that each one is as bright and crisp as possible.
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Fender Blacktop Telecaster
Ovation Celebrity
Amp
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Drums
OCDP Avalon Series w/ Zildjian Custom A/K

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