#1
I'm trying to link multiple tracks up to the same effect, so that when I'm double tracking (or more), I don't have to kill my computer by running 4 things of ReaVerb or Amplitube or whatever. I'm using Reaper and Cubase LE4, by the way, but mostly Reaper.
#2
i was wondering about this in reaper the other day, i dont know unfortunately but i'm gonna keep an eye on this thread
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#3
You can do this in two ways. One is to set up send effects, usually called an AUX channel for each effect. What that does is allow you to basically send each track to each effect and blend in the raw track with the effected signal. You only run the effect plugins once each but you can, effectively, use them om all available tracks.

You can also set up a group fader AUX for the tracks you want to use the same effects on. This is common for drums, backing vocals, and guitars. Instead of sending the output of the individual tracks to the master out you create an AUX track that you send to which, in turn, sends the signal to the master.

EDIT: The first example I mentioned is explained, and illustrated, very well here: http://en.wikiaudio.org/Reaper:Bussing_effects . Check the video.
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Last edited by ebon00 at Sep 18, 2010,
#4
I don't think you can do it with Amplitube because you would still be able to hear the raw sound from the track along with the effect signal. I'm not totally sure though.
#5
Quote by maggot9779
I don't think you can do it with Amplitube because you would still be able to hear the raw sound from the track along with the effect signal. I'm not totally sure though.


Running an amp sim. as a buss effect wouldn't be a good idea, no. Bussing effects work better on things like reverb, delay, and in some cases compression. Amp sims. don't really work well when using group tracks either since the plugin would respond differently to being applied to one track rather than having a number of tracks sent to one instance. For amp sims. I'd suggest running one instance for each track. If your computer can't quite handle that I'd suggest using a freeze option (if available) or bouncing the track with the amp sim. and then sending that to a group track (or using buss effects).

One thing that buss effects can do that you really can't do when using a plugin on each individual track (at least not that I'm aware of) is that you can pan the effect independently of the original signal. This can be used as a simple way to double guitar tracks for instance. Set up a doubling delay on a buss/AUX, pan the original signal hard right and then pan the effect send of the doubling delay hard left.

It can also be used to simulate a band playing "live" in the studio. These days guitar tracks tend to be recorded completely in isolation but back in the 70's, basic tracks were recorded live in a large live room with relatively little separation which meant that you ended up with spill. So if one guitar wasn't playing you'd still hear a faint sound of the other guitar since the mic was picking it up in the room (the most obvious example I can think of is the opening riff in Parasite by KISS; listen to it on speakers or headphones and pan hard left and right). Using a reverb as a buss effect you pan the original signal one way and the reverb the other way.
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