#1
After a year or so of obsession over every pedal and spending a LOT of money I later sold at a loss, I've found the only really effect I want is a little bit of dirt (i.e. Sansamp Bass Driver.) However, I'm still interested in the tone shaping side of stomp boxes, such as:

Equalisers, Tube EQs, Attack EQs, Attack Expanders, Compressors, etc.

So I'd like to open a general (bass related) discussion on such things. However I would like opinions on the EHX Attack Expander and Knockout Attack Equaliser if anyone has used one.

And compressors, how do they affect tone aside from increasing sustain. I've never heard sample of people using compressors and explaining exactly what it happening.
#2
well the only part i can help here with is the compressor
it makes the louder parts quiter and the quiet parts louder makes it more even
#3
Quote by supersac
well the only part i can help here with is the compressor
it makes the louder parts quiter and the quiet parts louder makes it more even


So if I wanted to use a foam mute on my Pbass to separate the notes out in alternate picking, would a compressor let me keep the attack of the pick? Or would it just ruin the effect of the mute.
#4
The Foam Mute and the Compressor have nothing to do with eachother, Foam Mute will give you that sexy Reggae thud, Compressor (depending on the settings) evens out volume peaks your playing.

I heard that the only way you know when a good compressor is on is when its off.
"Whats that noise??"

"... Jazz"
#5
Quote by Spaz91
So if I wanted to use a foam mute on my Pbass to separate the notes out in alternate picking, would a compressor let me keep the attack of the pick? Or would it just ruin the effect of the mute.


Generally speaking if you're using something like muting to control the dynamics of your playing, you're better off just avoiding compression, because if done wrong it can just make a mess of your sound.

I heard that the only way you know when a good compressor is on is when its off.


This. What a compressor is actually doing is boosting the quieter parts of your signal, and attenuating the louder parts. It's very easy to go over-the-top with one, and the result of that is that rather than simply evening out your dynamics, it destroys them all together. Sometimes this can be used to a particular desired effect, but in general a compressor isn't intended for that purpose.

The best use for a compressor in a live setting is to even out your playing if you're swapping between multiple techniques within songs; ie, when you play slap, it's louder than fingerstyle, and if you tap, it's usually quieter than fingerstyle; if you're doing all these 3 things in one song, correct use of a compressor can help to keep it under control. The slap won't be overpowering any more, and the tapping won't get lost.
#6
Ah right, so a compressor is more of a long-term live application to switch between styles. I was hoping to use a foam mute to kill sustain (to change the bass sound from dundundundun to dun dun dun dun if you know what I mean) and use a compressor to bring back the elements of tone that would be drowned out. Seems that isn't the case.

So does anyone know much about the Steel Leather Attack Expander? I've seen one demo online but the guy how does it seems to have cut everything but the treble.
#7
Quote by Spaz91
(to change the bass sound from dundundundun to dun dun dun dun if you know what I mean)


palm muting would work for that, no?
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#9
wait wait... you'd wanna put the foam mute in to kill sustain, but then keep the exact same tone?

why not play semi staccato?
"Whats that noise??"

"... Jazz"