#1
Hey Guys!

My church just started a new worship band. We're going to be doing heavier versions of worship songs. I'm a pretty new guitarist, but at times I'm the only guitarist (our acoustic guitar play also is our bass player and we don't have another electric guitarist)

My question is this--how do I figure out riffs and solos for these songs? The only thing I get from the band leader is chord charts. So it's pretty easy to strum to the songs, but I'm trying to figure out how to give it a heavier sound and add in some extra stuff!

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
#2
solos are pretty easy if you know the patterns. like if you want a solo and your current chord is Am just go to an Am pattern and play any note. the notes in between dont really matter as long as you hit the chord changes correctly.

for a beefier sound, cut the mid range on your amps EQ. and if you play 5th chords, like

g5
d5
a3

you can add in another 5th below and get
g5
d5
a3
E3

that will heavy up your sound real nice. Esp if you have a 7+ string guitar.
#3
tbh, I have no clue by what you mean with "making "worship music" heavy", if that makes any sense. However, if you have the chord charts, you have the chords, and you can throw anything in to colour the sound, like passing notes etc.
I do not want to have a signature anymore.
#4
Just chug on the E5 chord and scream "I LOVE YOU JESUS CHIRIIIIST" as loud as you can for 5 minutes.
#5
post the 1st couple of measures of a song that you are trying to convert, most hymns are major progressions so it`s going to be fairly easy.

don`t scoop your mids if you want your guitar to cut through the mix

@piszcel... reported for trolling
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Sep 19, 2010,
#6
Fingerpick some melody into it rather than straight strumming, would be muchus gnarlius.
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#7
Figure out what vocal melody is being sung over top of each chord. Then palm mute the lowest string at whatever note the chord being played is at 16th notes and whenever the vocal melody's note changes, skip a few strings and hit that note. This is a very metalcore thing to do, but it's a way to make riffs. Hopefully you understood that, I'll try with an example...


------------------------------------||
--7-------10-------10-------7-------||
--------------------------------9---||
------------------------------------||
----------------------0-0-0---0---0-||
----0-0-0----0-0-0------------------||


That's the first bar of As the Deer in drop D, the key might be off by a step but you get the idea.

Also, I thought I'd just mention Becoming the Archetype, they cover "How Great Thou Art", but they change it up a LOT.
You will bow at my feet or I'll rip out your knees

and make of your face all the carnage you crave
Last edited by 6StringSlaughtr at Sep 19, 2010,
#8
One way I'm currently making it sound heavier is by going drop D and playing power chords. It's making it sound quite good. But as for riffs and stuff, I'm still pretty clueless. I don't know much about music theory either. I can tell you the chord progression on the songs we're doing is C-G-Em-D for the verse and G-D-C-G-Em-D on the chorus and C-G-D on the Bridge (Mighty to Save), C-G-Em-D through out the whole thing (Glorified by Jared Anderson) and Bm-G-D-A for verse and chorus and Bm-G-Bm-G-Bm-G-Bm-G-Bm-C#-D-E-D-E-F-E-G for the Bridge (Grace Like rain, Todd Agnew) Obviously we're working on more song than just this, but these are the ones we're playing for our opening night.

As for placement of riffs and solos so it adds to the song, and how to actually play them, I'm pretty clueless.

We're not playing any hymns

And for an example of heavy worship music, look up some stuff by Seventh Day Slumber, Take Everything Album

Thanks Guys!!!
#9
I play in a worship band, and I know exactly how to make the traditional songs heavier, it's as simple as down tuning and transposing the chords to your drop tuning. I've been playing in my worship band in Drop C for years now, while they play in E standard. It's rough transposing your chords on the spot, but it makes it much more heavy and rockish.

You can't really add too much to the riffs, I've managed to add some things to some songs, but for the most part, the songs are so simple there is not much you can do with them.
#10
Good! I've been doing that ethan Except I only go to drop D. We don't have a very big band--either a bass player or acoustic guitarist (he switches off) lead vocals, drums, and backup vocals in addition to me on electric. So if we get another guitarist or two I might consider going to drop C. Thanks!
#11
Quote by shadowkamakazi
Good! I've been doing that ethan Except I only go to drop D. We don't have a very big band--either a bass player or acoustic guitarist (he switches off) lead vocals, drums, and backup vocals in addition to me on electric. So if we get another guitarist or two I might consider going to drop C. Thanks!


We don't have a bass player either, I tend to act as the bass, and awesome rhythm section at the same time, so I don't typically do solos, the other guitarist we have usually does the leads and lead vocals. Also, sometimes the piano can act as a bass if your pianist knows what their doing.

I actually switch between electric and acoustic sometimes too depending on the mood of the song, or I'll just use a clean setting on my guitar.
#14
^ Dude, I'm gona join that form, looks extremely helpful.

And yeah, you might, when I started playing in our band I knew nothing of how to play with a band, but they taught me and over time me and the band just got better and better.

It's gotten to the point where all the kids miss me every time I have to leave for a semester for college, they call me the "guitar guy".
#15
Haha I'm a senior i high school. Heck, our entire band is made up of seniors--minus our 28(?) year old youth director who has been in a ton of bands is leading it on Bass. But yeah, every time we practice, I feel like in just those couple hours I improve way more than practicing on my own for a week at home.

I'll definitely check out that site!