#1
Ive been playing for a year now. decent gear (my sig says spider3 15w but i mostly use my zoom pedal now) at what skill level should i be at. i started playing august of 2009. i can play riffs moderately fast ( things like pantera, slayer, and metallica). 1 thing is though, im extremly bad at soloing. i practice solo's as i do any riff, but i can never get a clean solo in ( references being Fade to Black's into{the fast rake part}, Enter Sandman solo, and Pantera's Walk.) am i not supposed to be able to solo at this point? IDK am i just being self conscious?
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#2
You have got to learn to play those solos slowly, and develop speed over time, they take lots of practice - And learning some scales and some scale runs will help you to learn and understand how soloing and improvisation works.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#4
Depends how many hours you have, a year means nothing, could be 100 hrs or 1600 if you practice 5 hrs a day.
#5
well its not really how long u practice, but the quality of ur practice sessions..try learning the solos slowly and accurately, then graduallly increase the speed as needed. also, try learning some scales and chords so you'll know a little bit about how soloing and imprvisation works.....i basically repeated what the first guy said, but i just wanted to post anyway
#6
i play about 4 hours a day most of the time. i first run through scales, play some riffs, then some fast riffs, then run through some solo's that i know and speed up, unsuccessfully.
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#7
If your unsuccessful at speeding up, you have not learned to play it slowly and accurately first.

Raise speed slowly. It really helps if you have a metronome, that way you can set it to a slow tempo.

After you have mastered a slow one and can play it every time slow, increase the tempo by say, 5 - 10 beats

if you can still play it cleanly at this tempo, raise the tempo up a bit more, until you find one too difficult to play cleanly, and evenly

Work your way up to it. If you just make this a common habit in your practice sessions, your speed will increase at a surprising rate.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#8
I can't play solos either, I can play solo sorta riffs in the higher frets but that's about it, I'm not really getting into solos yet since I haven't been playing long and still think i need to work on basics before i start doing solos.
#9
I've learned the most from the following advice:

1. Play slowly because eventually, a sort of instinct takes over and your finger placement will come naturally without really thinking about it. If you play too fast, mistakes will be committed to memory as opposed to what is correct and errors/mistakes occur. This took me years to get right. I didn't have natural talent but it can be learned through repitition. I'll repeat, this took years to master (somewhat).

2. Alternate pick it an easy mode of one specific scale until alternate picking becomes committed to your subconsious and you don't have to concentrate on it. If you have difficulty with certain parts of a scale, break it into parts and practice the parts individually until you can combine them. One easy scale to begin with is one of the pentatonic scales that doesn't involve to much stretching and only has two notes per string, at least at first. Three notes per string is a must eventually. I started with the g pentatonic because I have small fingers and the easiest scales are in the middle of the fretboard, not at the end or beginning which takes more skill and/or finger developement. You can work on that later.

3. Another good thing to learn is economy picking (or legato) Down pick the first string of the scale with your pointy finger holding it and finger tap the second string in the scale with the other appropriate finger, whether ring finger or pinky. Then do the same thing with the next string, next string, etc... Then do it in reverse from the bottom up. Up pick with the pinky, for instance and hammer on the pointy finger, ascending. That way, rather than moving the pick up and down, you are simply just going down, down, down, down, down (letting your ring finger or pinky hit the second note without need of the pick.) You can try it on open strings (no fingers) just to get the idea. Starting at the top, pick the top string going down, then the next, then the next. Add fingers and the hammer on, and now you have two notes. Notice how eventually, you can see how this can become something you might be able to do very fast?

5. If you mess up, start again, slower. Do not commit anything to your subconsious memory unless it is perfect. Do not memorize mistakes.

Eventually, after much practice, you get faster and your fingers do it all on their own. That's when you can begin to get an ear for notes. It's always good to know the root notes of the scale (beginning and ending on them) and all of the other ones in that particular scale, but that will come eventually over time, without or without learning them first. I don't personally think it's entirely necessary, at least in the beginning. I didn't have an ear for notes until I learned them this way. Knowing what they were ahead of time didn't help at all. But that was just me.

Eventually, pull offs will help after the hammer ons, to make the notes all come together fluently and sound like more notes are being played (which of course, they are). At first I tried learning songs but I found that learning to phrase with scales is more enjoyable and once you get them down, and how to use the notes and how they sound (eventually at different octaves or places lower on the fretboard) THEN, it makes it easier to play songs you already know, rather than trying to learn them note by note first, without finger dexterity and the basics.

This is how i've gotten proficient and over the humps that kept me back for years. It might not be perfect advice or the best advice for everyone, but worked for me. You can look up scales or definitions to words i've used in this response on UG search, if necessary, I tried to keep it simple but alternate picking, legato, scales, etc... are all things that you should research, regardless, on your own. Hope this makes sense. Enjoy.
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Sadly this is Ultimate-guitar, not Simple-guitar. We can't help you.


#10
thanks for all the advice guys, much appreciated
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED