#1
this is a question i have wanted to ask for a long time it may seem as a stupid question but here it is anyway



Heres an example of the inputs on a random mixer i have chosen for this thread now you can see that they are xlr and 1/4 inputs for each channel presumably for cable convenience i wanted to ask if i could route my vocal mic into the xlr and the mic that is picking up my amp into the 1/4' input of the same channel like for example channel one would be for both the vocal and amp .is it possible,will it sound fine or what. Also another question how many inputs should a person use to record drums and can they be done the same way like one input of a particular channel for like the bass drum and the other input of the same channel for the cymbals will it sound like shit or what?

Thanks in advance
Gear:
-Epiphone les paul special II
-Peavey Valveking 112
#2
Usually mixers always say to use one or the other input, not both. It should be in the manual which you can download if you don't have a copy laying around.
The mic input is for mic level signals where as the line input is for line level signals.

Mixers really shouldn't be used in a studio for recording drums unless you have lots of bus outs you can route to. The modern way is large input interfaces like the PreSonus Firestudio Project. These interfaces don't mix down each input so you can change each mic separately later down in Post=Production stages.

I say a minimum of 3 mics for basics on drums...2 overheads and 1 for the kick.
Eventually, putting a mic on each drum will improve the overall mix.
#3
Quote by moody07747
Usually mixers always say to use one or the other input, not both. It should be in the manual which you can download if you don't have a copy laying around.
The mic input is for mic level signals where as the line input is for line level signals.

Mixers really shouldn't be used in a studio for recording drums unless you have lots of bus outs you can route to. The modern way is large input interfaces like the PreSonus Firestudio Project. These interfaces don't mix down each input so you can change each mic separately later down in Post=Production stages.

I say a minimum of 3 mics for basics on drums...2 overheads and 1 for the kick.
Eventually, putting a mic on each drum will improve the overall mix.



I agree with most of this but on a budget I think it's acceptable to record drums using a mixer. Say, if you can't afford a presonus 8 input interface.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

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#4
Quote by moody07747
Usually mixers always say to use one or the other input, not both. It should be in the manual which you can download if you don't have a copy laying around.
The mic input is for mic level signals where as the line input is for line level signals.

Mixers really shouldn't be used in a studio for recording drums unless you have lots of bus outs you can route to. The modern way is large input interfaces like the PreSonus Firestudio Project. These interfaces don't mix down each input so you can change each mic separately later down in Post=Production stages.

I say a minimum of 3 mics for basics on drums...2 overheads and 1 for the kick.
Eventually, putting a mic on each drum will improve the overall mix.


judging from what yer saying is that if a four piece band wants to play live u need 3 channels for 2 guitars and a bass 3 channels for vocals and like 4 or 5 for the drums thats like 10 channels and 10 channel mixers cost an insane amount of money .
Gear:
-Epiphone les paul special II
-Peavey Valveking 112
#5
Moody pretty much covered it, but I'd also think you'd run the risk of overloading the mixer and clipping the signal if you're running two inputs into the same channel if it even allows you to run two at once... from what I remember of analogue mixer layouts in my lectures last year, most mixers will override the use of one input if another is plugged in... though I may have invented the last part as I was probably half awake during said lectures!

Also, unless you're recording the most basic of drums/genres you should probably at least spot mic the kick and snare in a recording, though if you go for mono overheads (which has been done, before you dismiss the idea) you'd still be using just 3 inputs for drums.
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#6
is it possible to use 2 mixers simultaneousness through the same set of speakers?
Gear:
-Epiphone les paul special II
-Peavey Valveking 112
#7
Quote by gutted_radical
is it possible to use 2 mixers simultaneousness through the same set of speakers?



If your amplifier or whatever is powering your speakers (assuming they aren't powered) has multiple inputs in the option to play multiple inputs at the same time....sure? But I wouldn't think that would be a good way to work. Especially not for the engineer.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#8
Quote by Artemis Entreri
If your amplifier or whatever is powering your speakers (assuming they aren't powered) has multiple inputs in the option to play multiple inputs at the same time....sure? But I wouldn't think that would be a good way to work. Especially not for the engineer.

i meant like give the drummer his own mixer cause his miking is complex and prob join them at the speakers or input the drum mix into the guitar ad vocal mix
Gear:
-Epiphone les paul special II
-Peavey Valveking 112
#10
One large mixer is cheaper than two smaller ones and the large mixers usually have more routing options which will help quite a bit in the end as well.

For live situations, use a mixer
For recording situations, use an audio interface
To record live situations and re=mix them later, use a digital firewire output mixer like a PreSonus StudioLive.

Thats what I would do in the above 3 settings although there are different ways to do everything these days.