#1
I've been looking to buy a new electric guitar for some time now, and I quickly observed that the majority of models I am interested in (I am looking for 'metal' guitars.. i.e. humbuckers, 24 frets, etc.) have a floating bridge of some sort. Why is this so? I have an Ibanez with a fixed bridge, but I've heard from almost everyone (including my guitar teacher) about how painful it is to change tunings, change strings ad sometimes even keep the tuning stable.

This made me wonder why there aren't more fixed bridge guitars out there, because I want a good metal guitar with a fixed bridge. Yet all the guitars that have appealed to me (in terms of looks and specs) have floyd roses (eg Jackson RR24, ESP Alexi 600, Jeff Loomis' signature shecter). I agree that tremolos are fun to play around with, but I'd rather have the freedom to change tunings as I please. This has really been bugging me as my search for my third guitar is hindered by this main problem.

Also, name some good metal guitars with fixed bridges I can look into. Budget is £750
#2
Buy an Ibanez Iceman.

And it's popular just because a lot of metal players use it. And it's not the end of the world to change strings or tune, people just overreact about floyds. It's no big deal.
#3
only get a floyd if your gonna use it
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#4
Quote by symba05
Buy an Ibanez Iceman.

And it's popular just because a lot of metal players use it. And it's not the end of the world to change strings or tune, people just overreact about floyds. It's no big deal.



It's a huge deal when you're used to doing it on the fly.

I'm a fan of Floyds, but I'm not going to talk down the truth about them.

If you want to change tunings you have to retune, play with the screws in the back of the guitar to make the bridge lay level, and repeat a few times...While a simple task it is time consuming.


Schecter also makes some pretty good guitars within your price range.
#6
Quote by Metallica1554
I've been looking to buy a new electric guitar for some time now, and I quickly observed that the majority of models I am interested in (I am looking for 'metal' guitars.. i.e. humbuckers, 24 frets, etc.) have a floating bridge of some sort. Why is this so? I have an Ibanez with a fixed bridge, but I've heard from almost everyone (including my guitar teacher) about how painful it is to change tunings, change strings ad sometimes even keep the tuning stable.

This made me wonder why there aren't more fixed bridge guitars out there, because I want a good metal guitar with a fixed bridge. Yet all the guitars that have appealed to me (in terms of looks and specs) have floyd roses (eg Jackson RR24, ESP Alexi 600, Jeff Loomis' signature shecter). I agree that tremolos are fun to play around with, but I'd rather have the freedom to change tunings as I please. This has really been bugging me as my search for my third guitar is hindered by this main problem.

Also, name some good metal guitars with fixed bridges I can look into. Budget is £750


Floating bridges are popular on metal guitars because they allow for some wild whammy bar work during solos (among other uses). Contrary to what your teacher says, changing strings on a floating bridge is not very hard if you do some reading and learn how to use the bridge properly. Ive found the floating bridge-equipped guitars ive owned have had much better tuning stability than my fixed bridge guitars. Again this is true as long as you know what you are doing. Changing to a different tuning is somewhat more complex, and this can present a problem if you change tunings often. Again, it all depends on your knowledge of the bridge.

Also, it is possible to "block" a floating bridge using various methods, effectively turning into a locking fixed bridge. Probably the most effective method is installing a device called a Tremol-no. It allows you to turn your floating bridge into a fixed bridge with the turn of a screw. Many people have used these devices with great success, and they arent that hard to install. This may be something worth looking into.

Ill post some fixed bridge "metal" guitars a little later.
#7
Quote by dethfield
Floating bridges are popular on metal guitars because they allow for some wild whammy bar work during solos (among other uses). Contrary to what your teacher says, changing strings on a floating bridge is not very hard if you do some reading and learn how to use the bridge properly. Ive found the floating bridge-equipped guitars ive owned have had much better tuning stability than my fixed bridge guitars. Again this is true as long as you know what you are doing. Changing to a different tuning is somewhat more complex, and this can present a problem if you change tunings often. Again, it all depends on your knowledge of the bridge.

Also, it is possible to "block" a floating bridge using various methods, effectively turning into a locking fixed bridge. Probably the most effective method is installing a device called a Tremol-no. It allows you to turn your floating bridge into a fixed bridge with the turn of a screw. Many people have used these devices with great success, and they arent that hard to install. This may be something worth looking into.

Ill post some fixed bridge "metal" guitars a little later.



Ive heard about the Tremol-no. You say it effectively turns it into a fixed bridge, but for example, can I use the trrmol-no to make the bridge 'fixed' and then change the tunings as I would with a normal fixed bridge guitar? Or would I still have to do all the silly floyd rose procedures with tunings?
#8
Ibanez SZ trem is stable as hell. while it has a couple of cons, the tuning stability far outweighs them.
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#10
Quote by Metallica1554
Ive heard about the Tremol-no. You say it effectively turns it into a fixed bridge, but for example, can I use the trrmol-no to make the bridge 'fixed' and then change the tunings as I would with a normal fixed bridge guitar? Or would I still have to do all the silly floyd rose procedures with tunings?

I have just recently installed the tremol-no on my Floyd equipped guitar and can say im happy that i can now freely drop tune with ease and not the headache of playing with the string tension. It also extremely easy to lock and unlock.
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#11
Quote by PeterPanKaKe
I have just recently installed the tremol-no on my Floyd equipped guitar and can say im happy that i can now freely drop tune with ease and not the headache of playing with the string tension. It also extremely easy to lock and unlock.


That sounds encouraging, but what about tuning down a whole step without having to go through the headache of playing with string tension, etc.
#12
Quote by Metallica1554
That sounds encouraging, but what about tuning down a whole step without having to go through the headache of playing with string tension, etc.


What about it? Lock the Tremel-No. Loosen locking nut and tune down..
#13
Quote by BobDetroit
What about it? Lock the Tremel-No. Loosen locking nut and tune down..


Well, it being a floyd rose guitar, will the tuning try to go back to E standard if I loosen the tremol-no?
#14
The solution is simple. Own enough guitars that you can have at least one in every tuning you play in.
#15
Quote by Metallica1554
Well, it being a floyd rose guitar, will the tuning try to go back to E standard if I loosen the tremol-no?

You can go as low as you want without touching the spring tension as long as its locked, but just like with any guitar you might have to adjust the truss rod depending on how low you go.
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#16
Quote by Metallica1554
Ive heard about the Tremol-no. You say it effectively turns it into a fixed bridge, but for example, can I use the trrmol-no to make the bridge 'fixed' and then change the tunings as I would with a normal fixed bridge guitar? Or would I still have to do all the silly floyd rose procedures with tunings?


I dont own one personally (i like floating bridges ), but as far as i know, when you lock it down, it basically prevents the bridge from moving like it normally would whe floating. If the bridge cant move, then you are free to tune it however you want without having to go through the re-tuning procedure you normally have to go through. The string locks at the nut will still be there, you can either keep them unlocked or continue to use them for added tuning stability, and also use the fine tuners for fine tuning too. You still change strings by unlocking and locking the string blocks, as well as cutting off the ball ends, but that shouldnt be much of a problem.


It basically turns into a double locking fixed bridge, like what the Ibanez RG2228 or the MTM signature series has. I personally really like these kind of bridges, as i like using fine tuners, and the tuning stability is amazing. If i ever decide to for-go the use of the whammy bar and use fixed bridges, ill probably get a treml-no and use them in this fashion.

It should also be noted that most if not all Kahler bridges have the ability to go from floating to fixed with the turn of a screw, without any after-market modifications. Ive got them on Agile Interceptor 8s, and they are pretty damn cool.
Last edited by dethfield at Sep 19, 2010,
#18
Quote by Levi79
ESP has alot of "metal" guitars with no trems

This.

And as to why, I dunno. The '80s, I think. I want a Kahler on my LP, but at the same time I don't.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
Last edited by oneblackened at Sep 19, 2010,
#20
Why is this so?

A floating bridge trem can be really great in the right hands, but they’re also one more shiny gimmick to sell to naive kids who don’t know what they’re buying. And it’s not only a metal thing. Just look at the popularity of Strats over Telecasters, and then look at all the people playing a strat with the bridge locked down and only using switch positions two and four.
#21
A lot of talented guitarists use a tremelo, EVH, Jeff Loomis, Dimebag etc.. That's usually why people get a floyd rose, to play the style of their favorite guitarists. The only problem is that the great guitarists out there that use their floyd well either use an original floyd or an Ibanez edge because those are the only ones worth having. Other lisensed floyds are only used to keep the cost of the guitar down, and they are a headache. So if you're serious about using a tremelo, steer clear of anything that's not an original or an Ibanez edge floyd, it's worth it to spend the extra cash, unless you plan to upgrade at a later date.

As far as being a pain to change strings and tune, changing strings isn't the easiest, but it's not as bad as everyone makes it out to be. Really, the only extra step is that you have to have an allen wrench to unlock the lock nut and saddle, and wire cutters to snip the end off. It adds maybe a minute to the string changing time per string.

As for drop tuning/alternate tuning, it's just like any other guitar if you use a tremel-no or a block of some sort. I use a few extra pick I have, I just add or remove picks until I have something about the size of the gap between the floyd and the body, wrap a piece of tape around, and stick it in there. That's it, takes me about 5 minutes and costs a couple bucks for pics. The only down fall it I lose the pull-up functionality of the floyd. Still, it allows drop tuning and tremolo use, and I get to use the fine tuners, which is my favorite part about a floyd.

But yeah, it's a little more challenging than a hardtail, but not anything any reasonable person can't handle. People make it out to be the hardest thing ever. So like others have said, if you want a floyd, get a floyd. If not, then don't bother.
#23
DAMN THIS. why is everyone afraid of the floyd rose?! i ****ing changed strings, changed gauge, i also changed the tuning once, and adjusted tension. NO BIG DEAL. done it alone man...

everyone who thinks its painful has either NEVER done it or has not followed some really basic rules..
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#24
Floating bridges allow the player to have access to some more tones and give you the "whammy bar" which people use for lots of different things. It can be used to give a "chorusey" effect to chords, you can do dimebag style harmonics with it (pick a natural harmonic with the bar pressed in and raise it up, etc), you can do tons of stuff. I sometimes use it for a percussive tone with a long held note (strum a chord and then use fast taps to beat out eighth notes or something to follow drum beat, etc.) It opens some doors to you that are tough to accomplish through other means. If it's something you want to mess around with or something you think you'd use go for it.

It is indeed a bit of a process to chance the tuning on one because, in order to get the bridge to lay flat instead of being tilted down or up, you need to adjust the tension of the springs underneath to compensate for how much more or less the tuning pins are pulling against them in the new tuning. If you change tunings a lot and don't have any other guitars this could be enough of a pain to not get a guitar that has one. In my case I have two floating bridge guitars and two fixed so I'm lucky enough to be able to keep a guitar in each of the tunings I like.

It's not brain surgery to string these things or change the tuning. After you do it once or twice it'll be like second nature. It is admittedly a pain in the butt to go from one tuning to another though but once you're accustomed to the process it can be done in just a few minutes.
Last edited by AndyR83 at Sep 20, 2010,
#25
My answer:
They are fun!

Schecter offers pretty much all of their guitars with a hardtail bridge!


Ibanez RG2228 Prestige
Schecter C7 Jeff Loomis FR (18volt mod)
Epiphone Gothic Explorer (with SD Blackouts)
Ibanez RG350M Yellow
Peavey C5 Tigerwood 5string bass
Randall RH150G3
#26
just buy it dude if youre not retarded the tension adjustment wont cut your penis and throw it in the washing machine, as many claim. i still have mine for example.
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#27
Metal guitars with a fixed bridge hey?

Hmmmm

Jim Root Strat


LTD MH350NT


LTD EC1000


Jackson RR5


Ibanez RG1451


Ibanez MT2M


Epiphone Prophecy


Should be a good starting point for you...

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#28
^ You do realise that picture of the MT2M You posed has a floating bridge on it right?
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#30
Quote by consecutive e
^ You do realise that picture of the MT2M You posed has a floating bridge on it right?


No it doesnt. It has a Fixed Edge III bridge. Basically a double locking fixed bridge.
#31
Quote by AndyR83

It's not brain surgery to string these things or change the tuning. After you do it once or twice it'll be like second nature. It is admittedly a pain in the butt to go from one tuning to another though but once you're accustomed to the process it can be done in just a few minutes.


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#32
No matter what guitar your playing, if you drop it more then a semi tone down, it needs a setup. So no matter what, changing tunings (E, to D, to C) often will always result in intonation problems and action problems.

If you're going to use a lot of different tunings, get multiple guitars.
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#33
Quote by dethfield
No it doesnt. It has a Fixed Edge III bridge. Basically a double locking fixed bridge.

Jesus christ you're right. I went to the Ibanez site looking for some kind of explanation, but nothing. How seemingly pointless.
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#34
Quote by consecutive e
Jesus christ you're right. I went to the Ibanez site looking for some kind of explanation, but nothing. How seemingly pointless.

Not pointless, a lot of people like the feel of a trem, plus obviously the tuning stability/fine tuners
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#35
just look for ESP or LTD with 'NT' in their name, they have no trem.
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#36
Quote by consecutive e
Jesus christ you're right. I went to the Ibanez site looking for some kind of explanation, but nothing. How seemingly pointless.


Not really. gives the guitar excellent tuning stability.
#37
The big thing about floyds for me is the string spacing - I'd much rather play a guitar with a wider string spacing than the standard 50mm - it just feels easier.
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