#1
How do I have my intro, verse, and chorus, etc.. lined in my song balanced and even? I was never taught how to arrange a song in the right amount of bars and measures, and I can't find anywhere online to tell me either. Thanks for any help.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#2
First thing you're going to need to figure out, is what the time signature of your song is. This will determine how many beats per measure we have to work with. Do you already have the melody of the song? Can you write in standard notation? Play the song on guitar or piano and use a metronome, or tap your foot to the beat. Work with the lyrics and see how they fit against the music. You may have to extend words to make them fit with the melody. That should get you started.
#4
It depends on what you want to do, you can have a long verse, or a short verse, a long chorus, or a short chorus. Usually the chorus is shorter than the verse, but it doesn't have to be. The intro can be as long or short as you want it to be, as well.

For example, in one of my songs, I have an intro, verse, chorus, break, verse, chorus, outro structure. The measures are 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 12, and a ton for the outro, respectively. Yours doesn't have to be like that, and not many, if any of my songs are like that. They're mostly different.

I guess you could listen to some songs by your favorite artists, or look up the GP5 tab here to get another look at it.
#6
No such thing. Listen to artists you like. Think about what you're trying to say. What you're trying to achieve with the song. Who you're trying to appeal to.

The more mainstream you want to be (mass appeal) the more repetition. Probably an intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus with the same chord progression would be the most generic.


Intro
Verse
Pre Chorus
Chorus
Bridge
Refrain
Solo
Outro

Just get creative man and show us, we'll tell you if it's good or not :P
#7
I concur with the above advice. As important, when you play something back does it sound right... does it sound balanced (enough bars, but not too many)? You need to get to work composing and recording. Then step away for a few hours (your ears and brain get saturated, and what can sound good at the time can sound a bit weak later). After your short break and listening to it again, it gives you a better sense of where some sections are too long, not long enough, etc. Music is very much based on math (length of notes, measures and bars, etc.), but there's certainly an art to it... and when you combine the mathematical structure with the art of composition, you get a 'craft.'
#8
i know, but i have know clue how many bars is considered too long or short...or the math.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#9
Quote by Slapp62
i know, but i have know clue how many bars is considered too long or short...or the math.


That's because there is no such benchmark. There's no objective number of bars, notes, or measures that one can point to and say "all songs beyond X number of measures is too long".

In fact, you could argue that there isn't even any real math behind it, beyond making sure your stuff lines up in the right tempo signature.

Most of what I write tends to adhere to the "Tyranny of Four"; I write in 4/4 time, four lines to a verse, and multiples of four measures for the length of same.

Really, just record what you have and post it for some feedback. Either that, or buy a book on effective songwriting. We all have to start somewhere.
#10
What you can do is to select a song you like and that you think is ideal in regard to bar length and positioning (where the choruses are, the lead solo, etc.). For example, many Beatle songs are classic in terms of their construction... do a net search for the tab on any of these songs then figure out the structure and use it as a template. Once you get more experienced in song writing, I suspect you will deviate from that particular formula.
#11
Do whatever you think sounds right. I do this and sometimes when other band members play them they remark that something is weird, but they don't disagree with it!