#1
Hi. I've always wondered how people lay down their guitar tracks in the studio. I mean, do you play the whole song, or You just do it in sections like the intro riff, then record the verse riff and so on. Anybody with some studio experience help me please. Sorry if it sounds too noob...
#2
both ways work. it really depends on the song and what way you can get the best performance/s out of.
#3
When I'm recording (myself or someone else) I prefer to do it riff by riff to keep it as tight as possible and then I can identify any ****ups immediately without having to listen to the whole song through, then re-recording the whole thing again.

Typically, I work like this:
Get the drum track and click track all sorted, have it lined up in the sequencer.
Guitar 1 riff 1, recorded twice and panned slightly left
Guitar 2 riff 1, recorded twice and panned slightly right
Repeat for every riff

I tend to keep a hard rhythm layer of two separate parts consisting of two identical guitar parts to keep a consistent sound throughout
Solos, overdubs etc are all doubled up as well and will be recorded on separate tracks to the rhythm tracks, so that base layer remains intact.
ohai little sig.
#4
It depends on the difficulty of the song for me. Most times I can just go through the songs and then i'll redo the little **** ups. For a more difficult song i'll do it in bits.
#5
i do both, even on the same song. you do what the track calls for. and you do what the song calls for.

for example, on a song i did a few months ago i recorded the main acoustic part section by section (sort of). not because it was difficult, but because i wanted that track to be crisp and the transitions very tight. i then did an electric overdub to sit low in the mix that was recorded straight through. this part was more to add ambience so the transitions (and the whole track) were supposed to be more fluid.

thats just one example of something i personally did. there are many other reasons to use each method. as i said, you do what the track and the song calls for.