#1
Im thinking about bringing my guitar to guitar center to have them put on strings because i put on larger strings and it just has to much fret buzz and im not that handy with stuff. Im hopeing they then get it feeling back to normal with the larger string gage. I have an esp ec-1000. Has anyone done this? Are they reliable? and how much does it cost?

p.s. Oh yea would it just because my scale length is to small for drop c tunings or does it just need to be fixed by someone who knows what there doing?
#2
How do you have an ec-1000 and not know how to adjust a truss rod is a better question. Guitar center is alright but they can be expensive, especially for something that you can adjust yourself. That's one thing that angers me. People buy a guitar then don't know how to take care of it. Look up guides on how to do it and you will save yourself some money. And no the scale length is not to small for drop c
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#4
Your scale length shouldn't affect whether you can tune to Drop C. Chances are your guitar needs to be set up correctly. That probably means your bridge needs to be adjusted.

Guitar center is definitely reliable. However, it WILL be expensive. GC ain't ever cheap.

Edit: Dude, forgot about that. Yeah, read that link that BobDetroit posted, TS. You'll save a ton of cash. It ain't hard, btw, to do the setup yourself; just you gotta know how. That thread will tell you how.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 19, 2010,
#5
The advantage of a longer scale length is that if you're playing fast, you can (theoretically) have a cleaner attack to your notes. A shorter scale might sound muddier. But if you can't play super fast and still keep the articulation anyway, than the scale length is irrelevant.

Personally I prefer the shorter scale, since I can use heavier strings and get a beefier sound.
#6
Quote by Damaging_Excess
How do you have an ec-1000 and not know how to adjust a truss rod is a better question. Guitar center is alright but they can be expensive, especially for something that you can adjust yourself. That's one thing that angers me. People buy a guitar then don't know how to take care of it. Look up guides on how to do it and you will save yourself some money. And no the scale length is not to small for drop c


This is kind of a rude comment. By your logic everyone should know how to fix/repair or properly maintain everything they own, especially if its a higher end product. This is a little excessive for the average consumer/person. That's like saying everyone should know how to fix their car, washer and dryer, toster, television, computer, etc. just because they own one or own a higher quality version. That just doesn't make a lot of sense for the average person in the world today. I'm not saying he shouldn't learn how to do it himself but just because he doesn't know how to do it and because he has a higher-mid quality instrument doesn't mean you should be rude. Last time I checked the average Cadillac or BMW car owner doesn't know how to repair, modify or in some cases fully maintain their vehicle.
#7
My experiences with GC have always been rather nice...idk about the rest of the country, but the tech at GC charges $42 dollars for a setup for both Floyd and fixed bridge guitars, that's not too bad. Not to mention their online section for used items is cheaper than Ebay sometimes.
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#8
Go to a shop, alot of guitar centers will just turn you away if you're looking to get your guitar worked on.
#9
Quote by Zycho
Go to a shop, alot of guitar centers will just turn you away if you're looking to get your guitar worked on.


Yeah, a lot of them don't do much repair work, though I am pretty sure 100% of them do setups. They all have those signs all over the place that say something like "customize your instrument!" and when you read the fine print it's just an ad for setups.