#1
Hi, I'm a guitarist interested in bass. I intend to play heavily downtuned stuff similar to Korn. I'm primarily going for that sound. I know Fieldy plays a 5-string tuned to A. I'm not sure how it works when matching guitar and bass tunings. I normally play in D Standard, Drop C, or C# Standard on my guitar (6-string). I'm willing to spend up to $1000. I really like the Schecter Stiletto Custom and the Epiphone Thunderbird Pro but I don't know anything about bass. Are these good choices and what amps should I look at? I'll probably wait for a Black Friday sale. I also have a Boss GT-10 and I'm wondering if those effects would work for bass.
#2
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=737491

You may wish to have a read through this thread. It covers a lot of your questions.

For the sake of ease, many bassists tune the same as the guitarist(s), unless you are specifically looking for a Korn tone? If so, you may need to detune to A to get the strings loose enough to really clank against the fretboard.

If you're into Korn and the likes, I think the Schecter would be more to your tastes.

And your effects unit will work with the bass, however you may lose some low end frequencies.
#3
Why not get an Ibanez? That's what Fieldy uses. I'd say get a SRT 805DX or an SR 755?

EDIT: If you're new to bass and trying to play Korn I REALLY suggest you learn a good slap technique cause thats all Korn bass is really. Its alot to get used to from playing guitar to advanced slap techniques.
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Last edited by Cb4rabid at Sep 20, 2010,
#4
Why not get an Ibanez? That's what Fieldy uses. I'd say get a SRT 805DX or an SR 755?

EDIT: If you're new to bass and trying to play Korn I REALLY suggest you learn a good slap technique cause thats all Korn bass is really. Its alot to get used to from playing guitar to advanced slap techniques.

I hate to be a dick, but I don't think the slap technique used in Korn is typically considered a "good" one. I know there's no black and white in music, but... well, that had to be said. What works for Korn, works for Korn, but it's far from what I'd recommend to anyone hoping to learn slap.
#5
Well if you're willing to spend $1000, I'd suggest spending about $400-$500 on the bass, and $500-$600 on the amp.

For the bass, I'd suggest you look used. Check out Ibanez (the SR series is great, but the BTB might be to your liking too), a used MIM Fender, a used Peavey Cirrus BXP, used Spector Legend, or some variety of Traben.

Then with the leftover money, get yourself a really nice amp, again, I'd suggest looking used.
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#6
Quote by Ziphoblat
I hate to be a dick, but I don't think the slap technique used in Korn is typically considered a "good" one. I know there's no black and white in music, but... well, that had to be said. What works for Korn, works for Korn, but it's far from what I'd recommend to anyone hoping to learn slap.


Fieldy actually has great slap technique incorporating economy of motion. His tone however may be debatable, but the level of his technique should be in absolutely no dispute. It takes a lot of skill and practice to develop a decent slap from your little finger and then incorporate it fully and fluidly into your playing.

Victor Wooten actually does a technique that is similar in effect, but employing his fretting hand to get the second note- his "Open-Hammer-Pluck" technique. The second note is acheived with a hammer-on. Fieldy simply uses the momentum from his wrist to hit that second note, allowing him to hit the same note as the first, or whatever he frets afterwards.
#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Fieldy actually has great slap technique incorporating economy of motion. His tone however may be debatable, but the level of his technique should be in absolutely no dispute. It takes a lot of skill and practice to develop a decent slap from your little finger and then incorporate it fully and fluidly into your playing.

Victor Wooten actually does a technique that is similar in effect, but employing his fretting hand to get the second note- his "Open-Hammer-Pluck" technique. The second note is acheived with a hammer-on. Fieldy simply uses the momentum from his wrist to hit that second note, allowing him to hit the same note as the first, or whatever he frets afterwards.


Yeah, I get your point. I supposed I worded myself badly. What I mean is that it's probably better to learn the conventional technique before trying to learn different interpretations of it.

I'm a big fan of Geddy Lee myself, but before trying to play like him I made sure I had the basic two finger technique down, and I'm glad I did, because I feel that learning the technique that spawned all the other ones out there opens up a lot more doors for your playing.
#8
Quote by Ziphoblat
Yeah, I get your point. I supposed I worded myself badly. What I mean is that it's probably better to learn the conventional technique before trying to learn different interpretations of it.

I'm a big fan of Geddy Lee myself, but before trying to play like him I made sure I had the basic two finger technique down, and I'm glad I did, because I feel that learning the technique that spawned all the other ones out there opens up a lot more doors for your playing.


Interestingly, the first electric bass playing technique was all thumb plucking- hence the tugbar found on many vintage instruments. So really, slap bass in any form is closer to the "original technique" than two-fingerstyle is.
#9
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Interestingly, the first electric bass playing technique was all thumb plucking- hence the tugbar found on many vintage instruments. So really, slap bass in any form is closer to the "original technique" than two-fingerstyle is.


Yeah, I think it's always important/useful to explore the roots of your instrument.

What I was referring to was specifically fingerstyle; obviously it has many variations, 3 fingers, 4 fingers, 1 fingers, including the thumb etc, but the majority of the variations of that technique used over the last 30-40 years are adaptations of the basic 2 finger plucking. Therefore if you're a beginning bass player I think it's useful to start at first with a basic two finger technique, because then you've got a technique which you can adapt to play in many different styles, rather than learning to play in one particular style from the word go, which could become limiting.

And the same I reckon pretty much applies to slap. I think the best thing to do is to learn the conventional slap style started by Larry Graham first, then that will help you pick up other variations such as playing like Flea, or Fieldy, or some of the fancy Victor Wooten styles.
#10
Hm, well I think Fieldy is a great player/musician. I personally like his slap technique and I incorporate that in my slap playing (albeit im not so good at slapping yet and I dont practice it all that much). Fieldy was a pretty big influence on me even when I was a wee little critter, so for that, I thank him.

Sure, maybe his slaps arent as great as Wooten, and definitely his technicality isn't as great as Wooten but I think it isn't easy to play Fieldys stuff, I know I cant
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