#1
Hi,

I apologise if this is a simple question, but I cannot find an answer to it anywhere.

I have been learning the theory behind major chords, and the concept makes sense to me. Take C Major. Theory states that you require 3 notes to form the triad. C, E and G.

Why therefore, when translated to a guitar, do you play 5 strings? Surely, you are playing 5 different notes? Why not just play 3 strings that are fretted to a C, E and G.

Thanks

Dave
#2
355433. That's only three different notes. From the bottom up, you have G D G B D G. G B D. A couple of them are just repeats. The reason for this is it fills up more sound.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Quote by food1010
355433. That's only three different notes. From the bottom up, you have G D G B D G. G B D. A couple of them are just repeats. The reason for this is it fills up more sound.


Yep.

Also, because of the way guitar strings are tuned it's not always possible to play the three notes in order, which demands either muting the in-between strings (highly inconvienient) or doubling up. In the Gmajor example the user above gave, we double up on the root and 5th. Well it's tripled the G but hopefully you see my meaning. It's a convienience thing, but it also contributes to a guitars unique sound.
#5
Also, because a c major chord serves the same functions regardless of how many times the notes appear or in what octave, there are tons of different ways you can play a C major, or any other chord.
#6
Quote by SilverSpurs616
Yep.

Also, because of the way guitar strings are tuned it's not always possible to play the three notes in order, which demands either muting the in-between strings (highly inconvienient) or doubling up. In the Gmajor example the user above gave, we double up on the root and 5th. Well it's tripled the G but hopefully you see my meaning. It's a convienience thing, but it also contributes to a guitars unique sound.
I disagree with the bolded part. Once you're used to it, muting certain strings can actually feel more comfortable. I prefer it sometimes over playing full barre chords.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Thanks for all the replies, this makes more sense now.

So, using the C major as an example again The following strings / positions give the following note:

Sring 1, open = E
String 2, 1st fret = C
String 3, open = G
String 4, 2nd fret = E
String 5, 3rd fret = C

Therefore we have E and C repeated.

But, the two versions of E sound different, as do the 2 versions of C. Are they an octave apart, or is my guitar not tuned properly?

I.e. the string 2 C is higher than the string 5 C.

Thanks again
#8
Yes, they are an octave apart.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea