#1
Hey guys. I've been looking into getting a bass, hoping that I'll have more luck with that than guitar (not because I think it's "easier" but because I always seem to gravitate more towards the bassline in a song, even when I'm playing guitar). I'm looking at a couple different P basses and I'd be more willing to look on the lower end if I could drop this pickup or a similar pickup in it. My favorite bass player is certainly James Jamerson and this pickup is based off the one that would have been in the bass he used. So, I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with this pickup.

Oh and I'm using my Dad's Peavey amp. It's roughly 100 watts, from what I can tell.
#2
Pickups unlike the rest of the vintage guitar don't generally age well. Chances are a 1962 pickup won't sound the same now as it did when JJ had it in his bass back in '62. Your best bet is to look up custom pickup winders and tell them exactly what you want.

I'm making the wild assumption that because you're willing to pay obscene amounts of money for the real deal that you've easily got the money to look at custom winders.
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#3
You could probably find a 1962-vintage Precision Bass pickup for sale somewhere, but it wouldn't be cheap. More to the point, it wouldn't offer you anything that you can't get from a modern replacement. Companies like Seymour Duncan, Lindy Fralin and Nordstrand all make great replacement pickups for the Precision bass. You can get vintage, aged vintage or modern tones out of them.

http://www.nordstrandpickups.com/bass-pickups/index.shtml

http://www.fralinpickups.com/bass.asp

http://www.seymourduncan.com/products/basslines/
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#4
Quote by skater dan0
Pickups unlike the rest of the vintage guitar don't generally age well. Chances are a 1962 pickup won't sound the same now as it did when JJ had it in his bass back in '62. Your best bet is to look up custom pickup winders and tell them exactly what you want.

I'm making the wild assumption that because you're willing to pay obscene amounts of money for the real deal that you've easily got the money to look at custom winders.


nah, man. That's what Fender calls, what appears to be the reissue of the Pickup.

http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Original-62-P-Bass-Pickup?sku=301602

Nah, I wouldn't go that crazy on my first bass, I wouldn't even go as far as a custom pickup maker. I want to see if I actually take to the instrument first, but I would like one that I can grow into. A mexican with one of these pickups seems to be a good half way point between one I'll grow out of quickly and one that I'd have to take out a loan to afford.
#5
A number of Fender's reissue Precision Basses come with that pickup. It's good, and gives a typical P-Bass tone. It will fit in any Fender P-Bass (unless it's a weirdo model that doesn't use the split humbucker) without modification. If you want the Jamerson tone, grab a P-Bass and a set of La Bella flatwounds and you're good to go. You will also need this book:

http://www.bassbooks.com/shopping/shopexd.asp?id=44

No self-respecting James Jamerson fan who plays bass would be caught dead without it.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley