#1
Hi guys,

i've been playing a year now and have learnt and know the theory of alot of chord based work, so i feel pretty happy about that,

with the solo bits, i've learnt scales and how you get the scales etc...

the bit i am stuck on is for example, what scale would i play in? how do you know which scale is right?

for example if i was using the Emaj scale at the 12th fret.... in that shape...
could i use anything else on other places of the neck? as i feel i'm not really getting anywhere...

a push in the direction of appropriate lessons on here or something would be great help!
#2
If you're using the E major scale, you can use that anywhere on the neck.

Any of these notes are fair game:

Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
i know the key of music... eg key of c d e f g etc... ?

is there something blatantly obvious im missing?

for example where would i use the e natural minor scale?
#5
Quote by daverichards
i know the key of music... eg key of c d e f g etc... ?

is there something blatantly obvious im missing?

for example where would i use the e natural minor scale?
In a song in E minor.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by daverichards
is there not some lesson on this, i hate to annoy you guys?
Yes, there are lessons. Don't worry about it though, we're here to answer questions.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
that question about the natural minor was supposed to have been the harmonic minor sorry!

i've learnt some basic shapes for various scales and in different places...

a thing what im wondering is for example,

if a song/chord progression is in the key of C, can you only use the notes in the Cmaj scale?
Last edited by daverichards at Sep 20, 2010,
#9
Quote by daverichards
that question about the natural minor was supposed to have been the harmonic minor sorry!

i've learnt some basic shapes for various scales and in different places...

a thing what im wondering is for example,

if a song/chord progression is in the key of C, can you only use the notes in the Cmaj scale?


No, you can use notes outside of the scale. They are called accidentals.
#11
Basically a note you add in that isn't part of the key, but as long as you end on the root note it should sound fine. It's used in Jazz a lot.
#12
what i'm thinking is..

so if i'm in C and soloing using the notes in Cmaj scale, could i not use the C harmonic minor scale shape?
#13
Not off the top of my head. I'd learn how to use scales before worrying too much about them. Do you understand intervals and how to construct the major scale?

EDIT:
Quote by daverichards
what i'm thinking is..

so if i'm in C and soloing using the notes in Cmaj scale, could i not use the C harmonic minor scale shape?


Not really. If you are soloing over a Cmaj progression, then you are playing in C major. You could use notes from the harmonic minor, but they'd be accidentals (if they weren't notes shared by the two scales); getting it to sound pleasant is going to be difficult.
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Sep 20, 2010,
#14
quick question on a side note but similar, how do you identify a key of a song when there is no chords used? say the song is strictly melody lines and you want to solo over the melody how would you identify the key since there are no true chords being played
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#15
Quote by Sheepbane
quick question on a side note but similar, how do you identify a key of a song when there is no chords used? say the song is strictly melody lines and you want to solo over the melody how would you identify the key since there are no true chords being played



no idea! enlighten me?
#16
Quote by Sheepbane
quick question on a side note but similar, how do you identify a key of a song when there is no chords used? say the song is strictly melody lines and you want to solo over the melody how would you identify the key since there are no true chords being played


A melody can imply chords. However, just look at the notes used and listen to which note the melody resolves best to.
#17
the next thing is modes? i understand a very basic pattern on the modes etc

i just wanted to know the uses? i know it's going to be pretty broad, is there a easy to follow lesson on here?
#18
Quote by daverichards
the next thing is modes? i understand a very basic pattern on the modes etc

i just wanted to know the uses? i know it's going to be pretty broad, is there a easy to follow lesson on here?
You're not nearly to the point where you will begin to understand modes. Work on tonal harmony and theory before moving on to modal.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#20
An example of playing "different notes" over something in the key of C major would be the blues in C maj. Although the progression is in C maj, musicians will often play the C minor penatonic (or blues) scale over it to give it a "bluesy" sound. The scale isn't really the C minor pentatonic, it's just the major scale with accidentals attached to it.

Where to go from here? Well I'd learn the major scale completely, and learn about keys and chord theory. As noted before, it would be good to learn how the scales are constructed to help you understand where you are in the scale and how to use it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#21
Quote by Sheepbane
quick question on a side note but similar, how do you identify a key of a song when there is no chords used? say the song is strictly melody lines and you want to solo over the melody how would you identify the key since there are no true chords being played



Easy, note where it resolves to.

Knowing your Major scales helps.

Best,

Sean
#22
Change of key isn't all that bad either. But stick to a key for a couple of measures first.
#23
when you are saying learn the full major scale? what exactly do you mean? i know the 14 note scale pattern thing on both positions?
#24
Quote by daverichards
when you are saying learn the full major scale? what exactly do you mean? i know the 14 note scale pattern thing on both positions?


That means learning every major scale (C major, Db major, D major etc.), everywhere on the neck.
#29
Quote by daverichards
Hi guys,

i've been playing a year now and have learnt and know the theory of alot of chord based work, so i feel pretty happy about that,

with the solo bits, i've learnt scales and how you get the scales etc...

the bit i am stuck on is for example, what scale would i play in? how do you know which scale is right?
[...]


Which scale is right is largely dependent on the type of chords you play, whether the song remains in a single key or not, and artistic preference. If you're just starting out I would suggest reading this http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/beginner/solo-scale-choice-confusion/
#30
I think dehufter had it right; lots of repition..... and practice is definately required. All the great players, from Hendrix to Jeff Beck, used to spend every waking moment getting to know their guitar, playing it - making it a part of them. I think both these guitarists used to take their Axe's into the toilet with them! That's dedication!

Obviously an understanding of scales, etc is great.... but personally, I find just playing the scales which fit the particular chord structure my friend is playing or I have recorded to be limitting - you have to experiment with the whole fret board, not just the set scale. Use your ears to find the notes that will fit, not just your lesson books or the internet.

It will take hours of practice but will be worth it.
#31
Well obviously when you know the entire major scale in one key, it's pretty easy to apply it to others. Just move the root note. So it's not as daunting as it may seem. It's not like I learnt C major, then C# major, then D major etc.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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