#1
first off sorry if this doesn't belong here, i figured it would.

anyways, im getting serious about learn by ear and have tab a song or two but im having problems. i can't hear under the voice. i'm starting with nirvana songs because there relatively simple i guess but in a way they aren't. take sliver for example, i found a guitar only track online and was listening to it, simple enough, wasn't hard sounding, then i go listen tot he actually song and i hear hear the guitar for crap, it seems impossible for me. does everyone have this problem? any tips?

also, i tried tabbing out drain you by nirvana as well i seem to have gotten the chord progressions right, but i didn't pick the exact right chord, do you know what i mean? like for example a part in the songs goes A5, G5, F#5 all on the low E but i thought it went, C#5, Bb5, A#5 on the A string. its the same distance between chords but starting at a different spot... i assume this happens with alot of beginners?

also, is there any tips to find the root note?

and one last thing, like i said above, i found a guitar track for a song and was listening to it.. would that be good to try and play from just hearing it? would that be a good thing to do? or should i try and transcribe the song with al;l that other stuff going on? (bass, drums, vocals)

oh, just so no one says anything, I REALIZE this takes time, i'm just looking for tips basically. I appreciate all reply's.
#2
first off I'd recommend you play around with your own guitar. Do chromatics over and over everywhere until you get to the point where you notice the root note because you've played it a lot of times. After that try listening to the song slowed down that might help if you're learning the song by ear.
#4
Quote by Dopemgs
first off I'd recommend you play around with your own guitar. Do chromatics over and over everywhere until you get to the point where you notice the root note because you've played it a lot of times. After that try listening to the song slowed down that might help if you're learning the song by ear.


i can't afford to buy programs that slow down songs...

and chromatics?
#5
There must be some free programs you can use to slow songs down. The only one I can think of is Audacity, which should do that and more. I think there's a slider to change the speed in there.

Of course, ear training in general will help. But the best you can do is probably what you're doing now. Trying to figure it out and checking if you got it right or not. Keep at it, it'll improve.

You might also try GNU Solfege for ear training drills. It's also totally free, and can help with interval drills and a lot more.
"Whaddya mean DYNAMICS?! I'm playing as loud as I can!"
#6
Quote by Grep
There must be some free programs you can use to slow songs down. The only one I can think of is Audacity, which should do that and more. I think there's a slider to change the speed in there.

Of course, ear training in general will help. But the best you can do is probably what you're doing now. Trying to figure it out and checking if you got it right or not. Keep at it, it'll improve.

You might also try GNU Solfege for ear training drills. It's also totally free, and can help with interval drills and a lot more.



I have audicity and i don't understand how to use it at all. i'm not very good with computers, i hardly know how to do anything other than open a web browser LOL.

i figured id do that, i mean, i want to get good at it and i dont see any other way.

i'll check it out and have a friend help download it if it needs downloading... what exactly is it?

EDIT@ CMD i already tried that... i actually find it easier trying to measure the distance between notes with my ear that doing the whole recognize the first two notes of popular song thing... if that is what you mean.
Last edited by schism8 at Sep 21, 2010,
#7
Quote by schism8
I have audicity and i don't understand how to use it at all. i'm not very good with computers, i hardly know how to do anything other than open a web browser LOL.

hehe I believe there's an FAQ on it in the Recording forum. Might be of some use. Otherwise, reading the docs for it might help.

Quote by schism8

i'll check it out and have a friend help download it if it needs downloading... what exactly is it?

You mean GNU Solfege? It has all sorts of drills and such, but I'll describe the interval training part, if that helps. Basically, you can choose what intervals to drill. For example, seconds. It will then play two notes either a minor or a major second apart. You then tell it which of the two it just played.

You can also use different ways of giving it the answer. The default is just buttons with the name of the interval. But you can also do it on a guitar fretboard, piano keyboard and similar things. On those, it will show you the first note on the instrument, and you must click where the second note is. Great for learning what the intervals look like on the instrument.
"Whaddya mean DYNAMICS?! I'm playing as loud as I can!"
#8
Slowing down songs in Audacity also happens to distort the tones, meaning they are higher / lower than what it is perceived as in the song.

Go to goodear.com

Do the interval training, chord training etc. BUT! Please please please do this. Find those on your guitar before you click what interval / chord it is. Find it, make sure you have it right, then click which one you think it is. This not only trains your ear to hear these things, but also says where it is on the guitar. It has worked for me, and I can guarantee it (i actually want to write a program and lesson for this).

Do that for like an hour a day, you'll see improvement in a week. Once you're doing decent in that (average about 24/25 per training tool) start transcribing songs. It'll be a breeze


PS - Make sure the sound your songs are coming out of, are good. Transcribing from computer speakers or shitty headphones is basically impossible.
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#9
Quote by Blurry 505
Slowing down songs in Audacity also happens to distort the tones, meaning they are higher / lower than what it is perceived as in the song.

/facepalm Right, I forgot about that. LOL

I know you can do it in Audacity with a plugin or whatever. But you have to load the audio and run the plugin on it. I use Linux, so I can't say much about how to do it in Windows. However, I found this on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0U9Y-fMujM

He shows you how to do it with Windows Media Player. Looks pretty simple. As a bonus, he actually shows you how to do it in Audacity too.

Hope that helps!
"Whaddya mean DYNAMICS?! I'm playing as loud as I can!"
#10
thank all of you guys so much, it's been a great help. but one more question, would i still gain experience if i slow songs down? like as much as if they are going full speed? i don't want to handicap myself in the future and only be=able to learn slow songs.
#11
If you can find a program that doesn't distort the tones when you slow it down, do it. It's a great way to get started. You just can't always rely on it, like anything else.
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"