#1
I've been playing for a year now and I know enough to play songs but I've wanted to begin creating my own songs and tunes for a while now and I don't know where to begin. I want an understanding of how I create something and why it would sound that way so I tried to begin some theory. I don't know where to begin because the lessons I've looked over always seem so confusing to me so I was hoping maybe someone could point me in the direction of where exactly to begin.

Side note: I don't know many chords at all so I guess I can add in I only pretty much understand TAB language so where would I begin with chords? I've seen that there's literally like a million chords so I was wondering if there was any hope of ever a need to know ALL of them?
#2
for the chords, bookstores like borders and barnes and noble have chord books in the music section. idk about the theory, trying to learn some myself
#3
Alright cool. Would you know of any way to help memorize them faster by both reading and hearing them?
#4
Try getting the gigbag book of chords, scales, etc. Mind you these are all separate books. They have diagrams of different scales and chords in different shapes across the fret board. And has helped to increase my chord vocabulary. But for scales I would recommend monster book of scales and modes and other exotic scales. It shows how to go from a major scale to different modes, to major, minor pentatonic, to minor and even harmonic minor and other exotic scales in 14 different keys.

I recommend going to either guitar center, musiciansfriend.com, or best buy to obtain these books.
Last edited by malmsteensolo at Sep 22, 2010,
#5
Thank you, I appreciate it. And if you don't mind, I'll ask you the same question that I had posted just above yours about memorization?
#6
Quote by TheGreeneRoom
Thank you, I appreciate it. And if you don't mind, I'll ask you the same question that I had posted just above yours about memorization?

Don't memorize the chords. Just learn the theory behind them and the interval patterns of scales.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
Well, learn the scale and how chords are formed. You don't have to memorize the shape, memorize the sound. The fastest way to learn is just to play. My $0.02.
#8
Where would be the best place to look for theory then? As I've said before, I have NO idea where to begin with it...
#9
Quote by TheGreeneRoom
Where would be the best place to look for theory then? As I've said before, I have NO idea where to begin with it...

Check out The Crusade series in the columns section of this site.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#10
do you have a guitar teacher, it is so much easier to learn theory from an instructor than from a book....
#11
No, I don't have an instructor..

Well, I read the Crusade and got up to the 2nd chapter (his first lesson) and I was already stumped. I'm confused as to what he means simply by the note A? Would he be referring to the A beginning on the A string or any A that's located on the fret and then on from there? Sorry if I'm a bother, it's just a bit confusing at first.. He's discussing intervals btw
#12
I would suggest starting with the book "Guitar Fretboard Workout." You can get it off amazon for $12.95 right now. It does a great job of helping you learn not only music theory, but also in how that theory applies to the guitar fretboard.

There are other good guitar books out there that discuss theory at length as well...and many of them can be picked up for a pretty decent price on the internet.
#13
Alright thank you, I think I will start off with that. Thanks a lot for the info. I see it has a lot of good reviews.
#14
Sorry for bumping my thread but there's something else I wanted to get answered..

There are times when I can 'hear' the notes in my head but when it comes to transferring it to the fretboard is where my problems lie. I'm curious, would theory be what would help me with this or is it something else?
#15
Quote by TheGreeneRoom
Sorry for bumping my thread but there's something else I wanted to get answered..

There are times when I can 'hear' the notes in my head but when it comes to transferring it to the fretboard is where my problems lie. I'm curious, would theory be what would help me with this or is it something else?


Theory won't help you too much with that. It's mostly pitch recognition.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#16
Oh, do you know of any exercises to help improve that? I mean, I know the general area of what I want to play but sometimes I just get lost. I know playing will help with that, but are there any specific exercises to help increase that?