#1
Ok, I have finally had enough... I seem to always rely on the pentatonic scale to do all my soloing and improv. I want to move away from the pentatonic scale as I always find myself falling into little traps.

I would like some help on improv. in major scales. I know my major scales but I just can't seem to use them well at all in a solo. When ever a major-scale solo turns up I'm always stumped into knowing what to do, so I panic, head for the relative minor pentatonic and I'm away, but I am totally sick of this.

Could someone please help me out, or direct me to some helpful threads or lessons..

Cheers.
#2
If you "head for the relative minor pentatonic" then you're not actually doing anything different, you're still playing the major scale.

Start thinking about what you want to play more and listen to what you create, if you just keep moving your fingers through the same patterns the same sounds will keep coming out. Listen to the chords your playing over and choose your notes based on how they're going to sound, rather than what your fingers are used to doing.
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#3
well, there are actually a lot of different ways you can use the minor pentatonic, especially in jazz. For example, you can play the pentatonic off various degrees of chords (try the 11th 9th 13th.. depends on the chord) to add some spice to your playing. Yeah. Stuff like that.

Another really wacky thing you can do is find the minor third above the Root of a major scale, then play a minor pentatonic on that degree. Hey presto, you're playing all the "wrong" notes in the scale, which gives a really "out" sound.
#4
Try using major scales modes such as Lydian, Phrygian, and Dorian. You can also try using the minor scale which is the aeolian mode.

If you wanna add flavor to your solos. Then try adding in some legato, and tapping techniques when playing scales.

This is what I use a lot.

e --12h-15h- 17t- 21

Pick 12 hammer on 15, hammer on 17, then tap on the 21st fret.

Take a wild guess what kind of scale this is.
#6
Why wouldn't you use the 457 other available pentatonic scales in your improvisation ?
#7
why not just break away from the pentatonic scale completely for the moment being and choose another scale to improv with? thats what i did
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#8
Quote by akaPeach
Ok, I have finally had enough... I seem to always rely on the pentatonic scale to do all my soloing and improv. I want to move away from the pentatonic scale as I always find myself falling into little traps.

I would like some help on improv. in major scales. I know my major scales but I just can't seem to use them well at all in a solo. When ever a major-scale solo turns up I'm always stumped into knowing what to do, so I panic, head for the relative minor pentatonic and I'm away, but I am totally sick of this.

Could someone please help me out, or direct me to some helpful threads or lessons..

Cheers.


It sounds to me like you're slightly stuck in a rut, moving your fingers up and down the pentatonic scale without really thinking about it.

Many great players have done great stuff using just the pentatonic scale. It's not about which notes you play, it's about how you play them.

It's time to start increasing you lick and phrases repetoire. Listen to solos and pick out the bits you like, learn them internally and then apply them to your own improvisation.

If you want to play in the major scale, then playing the relative minor pentatonic is a great way to do this. But you've got to learn some appropriate licks to play in that position, otherwise you'll end up just sounding like you're playing minor pentatonic licks.

It might help to read this to help you break out of that rut: http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/advice/whitney-elton-helped-lead-playing/
#9
Quote by willemhdb
It sounds to me like you're slightly stuck in a rut, moving your fingers up and down the pentatonic scale without really thinking about it.

Many great players have done great stuff using just the pentatonic scale. It's not about which notes you play, it's about how you play them.

It's time to start increasing you lick and phrases repetoire. Listen to solos and pick out the bits you like, learn them internally and then apply them to your own improvisation.

If you want to play in the major scale, then playing the relative minor pentatonic is a great way to do this. But you've got to learn some appropriate licks to play in that position, otherwise you'll end up just sounding like you're playing minor pentatonic licks.

It might help to read this to help you break out of that rut: http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/advice/whitney-elton-helped-lead-playing/



He's right a lot of. Great players use the pentatonic scale. Everyone from Randy Rhoads, Zakk Wylde, Slash, Kirk Hammett, even Eddie van Halen. Btw did u know that the tapping section of eruption and most of Eddie's solos were played using the pentatonic scale?
#10
i dont know why you would want to give up the pentatonic. its one of the most useful scales. listen to eric johnson. he almost always uses the pentatonic but doesnt make it so pentatonic sounding. one way you can do that is by using other pentatonic shapes in place of the "normal ones". if you are in a minor key for example, you could use the root 5 position in place of the root 6 position. and because you are still using notes from the key, it still fits but now has a whole new sound. its something ive been messing around with. also with pentatonic modal patterns. imo, it makes things sound less like a scale because the intervals are a little wider than the regular diatonic scale or modes.
#11
The pentatonic scale is probably the most useful scale for guitarists, so giving it up would be foolhardy. Instead, try adding more outside notes into your playing. Your sound will change instantly if you play some notes from the harmonic minor scale in your regular pentatonic licks. Learn some arpeggios as well; there's no getting over the fact that swept minor arpeggios will always sound cool, unless you overuse them. And therein lies the main point I'm trying to make - stick with your pentatonics, but throw in some tapping, some harmonic minor licks, a bit of sweeping...all stuff that will make you sound different and interesting.
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#12
Yup zakk wylde, slash, and Eddie van Halen have all used the same a minor pentatonic scales for 20 plus years. And look where it's gotten them. Take a little advise from zakk wylde just stick with the meat and potatoes, skip the bread.