#1
I recently changed my strings. Not going to lie, it was a horrible experience for me. This is the first time I've done it on my own, and I actually had to go through three pairs before I got it right because I kept breaking the strings on accident. Eventually, I learned my lesson and stopped buying Elixir strings until I actually know how to change them. Anyways, I finally got them on, but now I can't get my guitar in tune. I'm trying to tune the A string, but it won't even show up on my electric tuner I think because it's too flat. At the same time, I'm scared that the string will get too tight and snap if I keep turning the peg. What do I do? I tried to turn it the opposite direction but I can't get still can't get it to read 5A on my tuner. This isn't the only string I'm having problems with either. The only string I've managed to tune correctly are the low E and D. Any suggestions? I really don't want to risk breaking the strings again.
#2
you should go to an online tuner and listen for the sound of the string you need to tune, that way you can get it close using your ear and then it should register in your tuner =]
#3
We will get to possible reasons why you were breaking strings in a minute but first lets try to get that A String sorted, now I am making the assumption that you have the correct string, as in you have put the right gauge string on the A peg, if so then Try comparative tuning, i.e: fret your low E string at the fifth fret then play it, now play the A string, they should sound the same, if the A string is low then just tune up to match the E string played at the Fith fret and if its to high then lower it to match..
#4
Quote by holmesdec
We will get to possible reasons why you were breaking strings in a minute but first lets try to get that A String sorted, now I am making the assumption that you have the correct string, as in you have put the right gauge string on the A peg, if so then Try comparative tuning, i.e: fret your low E string at the fifth fret then play it, now play the A string, they should sound the same, if the A string is low then just tune up to match the E string played at the Fith fret and if its to high then lower it to match..


Yeah I've definitely got the right gauge on the A peg. I double checked as I was putting them on. I'll try this and let you know how it goes.
#5
Alrighty, that worked. I've got the A string properly tuned. What would you suggest I do next?
#6
so if you have E A D all tuned then using the same trick again play the D string at the fifth fret and match the G string to that, then play the G string at the Fourth fret and match your B string to that and finally your B string at the fifth frte amd match your e string to that, then to make sure just go back and fine tune with your tuner, now I always pull on the strings just to stretch them a little after I have tuned them then just fine tune again this just helps with bedding the strings in and helps keep the guitar in tune, new strings will always need a few adjustments for a while just till they settle in
#7
As to the reason why your strings were breaking be they elixirs, martins daddrios or whatever I would think that either you are damaging the string somehow when you are threading on to the tuning pegs or you are simply over tightning, ie; almost tuning up an octave, I know that I use alternate tunings and generally i am using light gauge strings and I really dont have a problem with them breaking during tuning, normally only when the blodds flowing and I am banging out something to loud, if there is such a thing, but I have a guitar playing buddy who I jam with from time to time and he is always breaking strings when he restrings, and normally he is just winding on the pegs way to much, so now he gives his guitar to me and I string it up for him.
#8
Quote by holmesdec
As to the reason why your strings were breaking be they elixirs, martins daddrios or whatever I would think that either you are damaging the string somehow when you are threading on to the tuning pegs or you are simply over tightning, ie; almost tuning up an octave, I know that I use alternate tunings and generally i am using light gauge strings and I really dont have a problem with them breaking during tuning, normally only when the blodds flowing and I am banging out something to loud, if there is such a thing, but I have a guitar playing buddy who I jam with from time to time and he is always breaking strings when he restrings, and normally he is just winding on the pegs way to much, so now he gives his guitar to me and I string it up for him.


Yeah that seems to be the problem I have. It's usually a result of me not paying attention then I end up winding it too much. As for my other problem though, I may have spoke prematurely when I said The D string was in tune. I take it that I should use the same method for that string as the others? Hold down the 5th fret on the A string?
#9
yeah thats right you just have to make sure that when tuning the B string that you move to the fourth fret on the G string, its to do withe intervals, but this method will get you sorted out then just check against your tuner and stretch strings a little like I said. Glad I could help
#11
I have another idea that will help in the future when changing strings and retuning the new ones up. It does require that you have the right kind of tuner though. Many tuners have the option of reproducing the 6 tones that you will be tuning the guitar to in standard tuning. When first starting to tung up the strings after replacing them, purposfully leave all of them loose. In other words, don't start cranking them tight and trying to bring them up to tune right away. No harm will come to the guitar at this point at all. Just get all of the new strings on first.
Then grab your tuner and start at the low E tone and bring the low E string up to that tone. Press the tone button once and it will change to A and repeat the process.
In this way you will avoid 1) overtuning the strings and 2) breaking strings by overtuning them.