Page 1 of 2
#1
(EDIT: NOW WITH A BRIEF POD HD500 COMPARISON ON PAGE 3)
Let me start by saying this isn't a bashing contest on one unit or the other. So any mods, please don't ban this thread.

Its for informational purposes only. Your mileage WILL vary.

This was originally over 25 pages in length so I've done my best to cut it down as much as I could. If anything is missing, or if you have any questions, please ask them here or send me a PM and I will answer as best I can.

In my opinion, these two modelers are currently the best on the market (excluding the Axe FX).

The following modelers I have used but didn't put in the review:

Boss GT-10 - Great FX but I (and most others) feel their amp modeling is not that good. Add to the fact that this is an extremely complex device and I don't feel it stands up well to the X3 or RP1000.

Vox Tonelab series - These are great sounding units but its effects sound too digital. In a way, they are the exact opposite of the Boss GT10. Although, I admit that many people still use and love them.

Johnson J-Station - One of the original amp modeling devices. They still sound great by todays standards but are finally getting a bit outdated.

Behringer V-Amp series - A cheap modeler that actually sounds pretty good. Both effects and amp modeling sound good. However, they lack the "professional" tone & features that you'll get out of some of the more expensive modelers.

Anyways, on to the good stuff:
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
Last edited by theraven871 at Dec 15, 2010,
#2
Form Factor

The RP1000 has a solid metal feel to it and actually takes up less room then the Pod X3 Live. The switches have a very solid “click” when pressed and nothing feels loose or poorly manufactured. It uses Digitechs “Grid” based interface that you’ll either love or hate. Personally, I found the interface to be very simple to use (but limiting). The expression pedal, while functional, doesn’t feel as well built as the rest of the device. Everything is very well organized on the back panel which makes plugging it in for the first time a snap. The power supply has a wallwort so be aware that plugging it in on an inline surge protector may take up more then one available power slot.

The Pod X3 Live is not only larger then the RP1000, but is also a bit heavier. The inclusion of handles makes this easier to pick up off the floor and store away. The expression pedal is full metal (with a skid resistant surface) and feels a bit more natural then the RP1000. You can also adjust the tension of the expression pedal. The X3 Live sports a well lit LCD display that shows your entire signal chain on one screen. The footswitches feel solid, but are not as durable feeling as the RP1000. The X3 Live sports an “inline wallwort” so that the final power plug can be plugged in without taking up additional space.

It’s difficult to choose a solid winner here. Both companies spent some obvious time working on the form factor and layout of their devices. The RP1000 has a very solid feel and gives good feedback with its switches, however, the X3 Live has a much more responsive feel/action in its expression pedal. Taking all things into consideration, the RP1000 wins this round because of one feature: The RP1000 sports an amp loop & an effects loop. Whereas the X3 only has one loop (that can be used as an amp loop or effects loop). This means that if you want to use the Pod X3 in 4CM, it is much more difficult to add your own effect pedals in the chain.

VERDICT: RP1000
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#3
Editing Presets

The Digitech RP1000 uses its grid system for editing and creating presets/patches. Love it or hate it, Digitech has made it clear that the system is here to stay. Editing a patch is as simple as using the up/down arrow keys to select the area you wish to edit, then using the rotary dials to tweak certain parameters. Now, this system is very easy to learn and use however, I’ve found that it also is a bit limiting. (As an example, you have no presence knob for the amp models). Despite this, Digitech has done a fantastic job of giving you the right amount of adjustments.

The Pod X3 Live is quite the opposite in terms of editing. On its main LCD screen you can see your entire signal chain (including which items are active or off). To edit an item, you simply highlight the item using the arrow keys and double click to enter that item. From there, you have a wide array of options to adjust. In fact, the X3 may give you TOO many options to adjust. Don’t know what “pre-delay” is? How about depth vs. width vs. feedback? While it is easy to get a good tone out of the X3 live; Getting a great tone requires the musician to learn a bit more about effects and how they work.

As before, it’s difficult to choose a clear winner in this category. When I use my Pod, there are so many adjustments that I find myself constantly tweaking my tone (even patches that were created years ago). While the RP1000 seems to be able to create a great tone with much less adjustment. However, that is at the expense of removing some of the deeper editing options. To be fair, I thought that I would hate not having the extra adjustments on the RP1000. However, I really don’t miss them as they aren’t required to get a great tone from the RP unit (unlike the X3).

VERDICT: TIE
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#4
Software

The RP1000 & X3 can connect to your computer via a USB cable. Then, on your PC, you can have a visual GUI (Graphical user interface) to both edit and create your patches.

There isn’t too much ground to cover here so this section will be brief. While both of these units do a great job with their software the Pod X3 Live is the clear winner here. The Pods interface is simply more vibrant and fun to play with. It makes it feel as if you are using the actual gear. Also, the RP1000 has a few bugs with their interface (which I won’t list here). All things considered, the Pod X3 Live software is light years ahead of the competition.

VERDICT: POD X3 LIVE
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#5
Recording via USB

Tested with Adobe Audition, Pro Tools, Sonar 8 and Guitar Tracks Pro.

Both units worked great in Adobe Audition & Pro Tools. Guitar Tracks Pro was a bit more work to get it to recognize the tone coming from the USB cable. However, neither of these units exhibited any problems being recognized or recorded. Additionally, both units had zero loss of tone during the recording process.

The biggest difference here is that the X3 live allows you to record a “dry” stereo track for reamping. Most musicians have heard of reamping but have never actually played around with it. Basically, you can take your recorded “dry” track and then use the Pod Farm (as a VST plugin) to “re-amp” the tone. What these means is that you can take a tone that is already recorded and hear what it would sound like as a Marshall JCM800. Don’t like that? Then you can easily change it to an Engl Powerball. All this can be done without having to re-record a new track.

Since the RP1000 doesn’t have any of these features, the X3 live is the clear winner here. However, please note that both units sound great when recorded via USB.

Note: For the best sounding recordings, I always recommend mic-ing up a cabinet.

VERDICT: POD X3 LIVE
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
Last edited by theraven871 at Sep 24, 2010,
#6
Effects

I’m sure this is going to be heavily opinionated, but I find that the RP1000 has much better sounding effects. For starters, it has real Lexicon delays and reverbs. I used to have an expensive Lexicon reverb unit years ago. Selling it was one of my biggest mistakes and I always regretted it. If you’ve never heard Lexicon delays & reverbs, there is simply no comparison. Also, somehow this RP1000 unit sounds just as good (for delays and reverbs) as some of the $2000 Lexicon units. The X3, while having great delays & verbs is clearly no match for the RP1000 in this area.

The X3’s weakest effect, its compressor is also no match for the RP1000. For years, X3 users have asked and begged Line 6 for a better compressor. Unfortunately, at the time of this writing, it remains the weakest link in the effect chain on the X3. On the other hand, the RP not only captures the tone of a good compressor, but the *feel* as well.

Stompbox Distortion modeling (Tubescreamers & distortion pedals) sound absolutely fantastic in the RP. Additionally, there are far more options to choose from here with the RP1000. Worth noting however is that the X3 has a great tubescreamer pedal simulation. Equal to the RP1000.

Modulation effects are the “Make-it or break-it” for most people. Once again, they sound good in the X3 and great in the RP1000. The X3 sounds a bit more subtle whereas the RP1000 can sound very lush and deep. After years, I never could get a chorus or phaser sound I enjoyed out of my X3. This wasn’t the case with RP1000. I was instantly impressed with it.

Digitech has worked hard over the years on their own pedals and also mimicking the technology of other pedals. All their hard work really shows here. Chorus, distortion, Flanger, Delay, Reverb, Phasing……they all sound better in the RP1000. Line 6 has done a fantastic job with their M9/M13 effects units, however those are not modeled here.

Another important note: Line 6 advertises a plethora of effects in the X3 units. However, many of these turn out to be odd synths or other weird effects that are not exactly usable by a guitarist. Digitech on the other hand has done a fantastic job of understanding what a guitarist wants and has given it to them……in spades. Effects such as a harmonizer simply don’t exist in the X3. Simply put, the effects in the RP1000 are more usable and sound better.

VERDICT: RP1000
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#7
Amp Modeling Part 1

This is probably the topic that you’re most curious about so I’ll do my best to highlight the differences here.

Clean & Low Gain amp modeling - Both units can produce wonderful clean tones & there isn’t really any accurate comparison I can make regarding the differences here. Low gain tones (to me) indicate a slight bit of distortion/overdrive. While both of these modelers produce these tones quite well, the RP1000 has a slight edge here. The RP has a bit of sparkle & chime in these amp models that is notoriously difficult to reproduce in the Pod units.

Medium Gain Amp Modeling (think ‘Marshall’ tones) - The Pod X3 does a fantastic job of recreating the gain structure of these amps and also responds very dynamically. However, it just does not have the magic that the RP1000 unit has. In my opinion, the medium gain tones are where the RP1000 shines. It has all the think chime and sparkle and just comes off feeling and sounding better than the X3 Live. I literally spent a few hours tweaking the Pod until I felt I got it to sound as best as I could. The X3 sounds quite well here, but the RP1000 sounds great.

High Gain Amp Modeling (Dual Rectifier, 5150, etc.) – Coincidentally, I traded another piece of gear for my RP1000. The original owner wanted to get rid of it because he said because he “Couldn’t get enough gain out of it”. When comparing the high gain (metal) amp modeling between these units, two important points become apparent. 1. The RP1000 seriously lacking in high gain amp models. 2. The X3’s high gain amp modeling is much more aggressive. Not only does the X3 sound better in this area, but also gives you a plethora (or overabundance) of amp models to choose from. I own a real Dual Rectifier and Peavey 5150 and the Pod’s simulation of these two amps are much more accurate. All things aside, the RP1000 doesn’t sound bad at all…….but the X3 sounds great. This is the X3’s strongest point.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#8
Amp Modeling Part 2

One additional area that the X3 has is with its "AIR" cabinet modeling. This allows you to choose what type of microphone you are using to "receive" the amp & cabinet modeling. And to adjust how close and what angle the microphone is placed at. Naturally, all these items play a large role on the overall tone (more then you would think). This is always why the Pod X3 actually sounds like its moving air and why some people say that they don't feel immediately connected with the the way they do with a real amp.

Both units sound great when powered by a tube guitar amp or tube poweramp. However, the X3 loses much of its tone when used with a solid state amp. The RP1000 on the other hand, does not. Which makes the RP1000 a bit more ideal if you plan on using a solid state (or FRFR gear) amp. However, it is worth noting that when used with a good tube amp, the X3 does sound a hair better than the RP1000. Please note that neither of these units are an Axe FX and really do require a tube amp to sound their best.
Overall, both of these amp modelers sound great. Since they both excel in certain areas its next to impossible for someone to simply state which is “better”. Typically, this will come down to your application. If you require better high gain amp modeling, then the X3 is going to be more impressive. If you require better low-mid gain amp modeling, the RP1000 is the way to go. If I have literally spent hours in this one particular area and have struggled to come to a verdict. However, the X3 does pull slightly away from the RP1000 here in the use of its “dual tone” feature. While I hardly ever use the dual tone option, it’s the application of the dual tone feature that makes it exciting. For example, you can have one tone through the ¼ outputs to your tube amp and then another tone via the XLR outputs to the mixing board. There are just so many options with the X3 (that aren’t advertised by Line 6) that I could spend days researching them. The RP1000 on the other hand, is much more straightforward.

Note that the dual tone feature isn’t as useful as you might think it is. Take this feature away and this section would be a tie. However, because of the additional setup options it creates, and the AIR cabinet emulation, the X3 is a hair better.

VERDICT: POD X3 Live
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#9
A Note about Fizz

"Fizz" is actually created in the preamp section of an amp when its under "high gain" settings. Real amps create fizz too. The fizz comes from the distortion itself. While the midrange EQ is getting "distorted" so are the high range of the EQ. However, when you're using a tube amp, there is a bit of natural "EQ Compression" where the power stage (IE The power tubes) of a tube amp actually compresses the VERY high eq band and actually attenuates it. This means, that even if your $2000 tube amp was creating "fizz", you never actually hear it.

Modelers unfortunately attempt to model distortion circuits EXACTLY and as such they also recreate the fizz. However, they do not have Power Tubes that attenuates the fizz so it is inaudible.

However, if you plug your modeler into the effects return of a good tube amp, it will actually reduce the amount of fizz you hear. Unfortunately, you may still hear a bit of fizz though because of the nature of a digital device.

The best way then to completely remove fizz is to use a "Shelf Filter". Shelf filters allow you to select a certain frequency range and either cut those frequencies out completely or greatly attenuate them. "Fizz" is most noticeable above the 10K range so that is usually a good place to start your shelf filter (BTW, a Harmonic Converger is basically an over-glorified shelf filter). If you use a shelf filter to cut off the high range of notes, you can COMPLETELY cut out your "fizz" and be left with just your natural tone underneath. Using this in conjunction with the power section of a tube amp (or an amp in 4CM) will sound VERY natural.

Pod X3 Live is the only modeler with a built in Shelf Filter. So you can completely cut out any fizz if you hear it.

Otherwise, neither of these two units exhibit any problems with fizz.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#10
A Note about EQing

While there is an obvious difference in the voicing and gain structure of most amps, the EQs section is something that is quite similar. The only real difference between EQs on amps is what frequency range they are adjusting and the width of that frequency.

However, how you EQ your amp is probably more important than that particular amps voicing. I cannot stress how important an external EQ can be. Take your favorite tube amp and notice how different it sounds by turning your Bass, Mid & Treble controls. Now imagine if you have 15-31 extra EQ knobs to adjust. At first thought this might be mind boggling but it’s absolutely critical to achieve great tone.
Far too many people get bored with their amps tone or find out (after purchasing their amp) that it can only get them 90% of the tone they seek. I see far too many people discarding their amps and getting new amps before they try to properly EQ them.
At one point in time, almost all of us have looked up what our favorite guitarist are using for their amps in hopes of getting a tone close to theirs. However, every professional musician uses a good EQ to help sculpt that tone. My point is that you will not get that tone your favorite band gets by buying the same amp they use. You had better believe they are probably using at least a 31-band EQ in addition to that amp.
Coming full circle, these same concepts can and should be applied when you’re using amp modelers (RP1000, X3 etc.). Don’t expect to get your Vox amp model to sound the same as one you have heard on your favorite CD. Unfortunately, you’ll need to spend the time and experiment with an EQ.
The good news is that, for the most part, decent EQs can be picked up for very little money.
If you do not own an EQ then do not worry about buying any more gear until you get one. They open too many doorways to be commonly overlooked.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#11
Final Thoughts

Understand that there was never going to be one clear cut winner here. These devices are both great in their own right and no matter which one you choose, you will be happy. (Note, contrary to popular belief, the amp modeling in the XT is NOT the same as in the X3. The X3 is a much better sounding unit so don’t think that you can go the “cheap route” and make an XT live sound as good as an X3 live).

If you are looking for an amp modeler and do not plan on using any real tube amps (or 4CM), the Pod X3 Live is going to be the better option for you. Its wide array of amp models and effects should cover almost everything you need. However, despite what Line 6 would have you believe, a beginner can definitely get a decent tone with this, but it takes and experienced tweaker to get a great tone out of it. For beginners I would not recommend the X3.

If you’re looking for effects only, or a unit to mix in 4CM with your favorite amp; then go for the RP1000. I personally use a high gain amp on stage and so (for my needs) I only need good quality effects and occasional amp modeling. Because the quality of the effects are so much higher quality than the Pod’s, the RP1000 is a better fit for me. And for the record, I personally love the amp modeling in the RP.

Now, this review should not lead you to believe that the effects in the Pod or the amp modeling in the RP1000 are inferior to the other unit. This should only serve as a guide for what to look for as you try out the different units prior to purchasing.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
Last edited by theraven871 at Sep 22, 2010,
#13
Nice review. IIRC the RP has a phase looper and the X3 doesn't. That could be a major decision maker for some people. Also no pitch shifter/whammy on the X3.
#14
I had to pull out my section on the looper to cut down the length of this shootout. But know that the looper on the RP1000 works GREAT.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#15
Thanks for the review! Never seen something so indepth that wasn't trying to sell the products! xD Anyway, I own a Tonelab LE and couldn't be happier but this was good information nonethless. Props!
Epiphone Dot
DIY Esquire w/Neovin Power Rock pickup
Vox AC30VR 212
Arion MTE-1 (LED clipping diodes added)
Vox Tonelab LE
Roland SDE1000 delay

Quote by DaMarsbarPerson
By high-gain I don't mean stupid stuff. I just mean styles like Motley Crue or Iron Maiden
#16
Just so everyone knows. I plan on purchasing a new Pod HD500 when they come out and running it through its paces.

I will definitely post a review of that once finished.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#17
Quote by theraven871
Just so everyone knows. I plan on purchasing a new Pod HD500 when they come out and running it through its paces.

I will definitely post a review of that once finished.

I'm really interested to hear about that one. I kind of had a double-take when I heard Line 6 was making a modeler with 16 amps. That's completely out of character for them.
Epiphone Dot
DIY Esquire w/Neovin Power Rock pickup
Vox AC30VR 212
Arion MTE-1 (LED clipping diodes added)
Vox Tonelab LE
Roland SDE1000 delay

Quote by DaMarsbarPerson
By high-gain I don't mean stupid stuff. I just mean styles like Motley Crue or Iron Maiden
#18
Quote by MortifiedLizard
I'm really interested to hear about that one. I kind of had a double-take when I heard Line 6 was making a modeler with 16 amps. That's completely out of character for them.


I definitely have a raised eyebrow about the 16 amp models as well. Although I'm reserving judgment on the unit until I have a chance to actually play around with it. Either I will like it and it will stay, or I won't and it will go.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#19
Interesting.

You should get a G-Major now and see how the RP1000 stacks up, effects wise
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#20
Quote by MatrixClaw
Interesting.

You should get a G-Major now and see how the RP1000 stacks up, effects wise

I have had a G-Major and owned a G-Major II for about a week (before returning it).
I used it in conjuction with my Pod X3 Live and with various tube amps I've owned. Now, there are not many bad things I can say about the G-Major....the G-Major II on the other hand didn't really add enough features (basically just an intelligent harmonizer) to make it worth "upgrading". For how cheap you can get a G-Major I these days, i would recommend that first.

Personally I would prefer a RP1000 to a G-Major II. Or if you wanted a rackmount unit, then you could get a GSP1101 (rackmount version of the RP1000). Personally, I feel its effects are just as good, and better in some circumstances. But there are quite a bit more effects in the Digitech units & they have some amp modeling. Taking that into consideration, I'm not sure why someone would take the G-Major over the GSP1101/RP1000.

Also, on a side note, did everyone hear about the new update for the GSP1101? You can now load your own IR/Cab Impulses into it. Up to now, the Axe FX was the only modeler that allowed you to do this.

Also, I should make clear that I've always loathed digitech products in the past. Their amp modeling always sounded awful to me. But these new products really perform well.

No product will completely replace a tube amp for me. Even the Axe Fx has its shortcomings tonewise. But these units sound GOOD and that is what is important.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#21
Thank you so much! I've been waiting on this for a month, and it has helped me a lot in my search for 'my' perfect modeler.
Gear:

PRS SE Singlecut Trem Black
ProDrive Tube 30w Amp
Valencia CG-170 (acoustic)
#22
my god. this was exactly was i was looking for.

how does the x3 and rp1000 sound in a tube amps fx return?
Member of The 7 String Legion


Peavey Triple X Head
Mahieu 4x12 Cab (celestion g12t-75)
Gibson Vixen
Schecter C-1 Classic
Various Pedals, and Guitars.
#23
Good lawd, that's alot of information. Very informative. Also very interesting about the impulse loading, although I'm pretty sure the Vetta can do that too.
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
What the hell is a G&L.



Quote by Flux'D
Gay & Lesbian I think, the box smelled funny
Greg what did you send me??
#25
Quote by natehimself
my god. this was exactly was i was looking for.

how does the x3 and rp1000 sound in a tube amps fx return?


The RP1000 sounds pretty good in a FRFR setup.
The Pod really wants a tube amp to shine.

The RP1000 in the effect return sounds great and it does add quite a bit to the RP's amp modeling. The X3 sounds fantastic with a tube amp.

If you cannot afford a tube amp (or tube power amp) then go for the RP1000.

Otherwise, its a close call. I did rate the X3 a bit higher for amp modeling but that was more for its application and the many uses it has. Personally, I find that the RP has a bit of "magic" that the X3 just doesn't. Of course, if you're looking for a modeler to handle ALL of your primary high gain tones, you may want to lean towards the X3. But that is not to say that the RP's high gain tones sound bad at all. In fact, many of the users I've spoken to strictly use the RP for high gain tones.

In a perfect world, we would all have great sounding tube amps and then use digital modelers to pick up the slack of the tones our tube amps don't cover. In fact, this is a great long term goal that everyone should work towards. If this is your intention, then definitely go for the RP. Otherwise, if you're looking for a modeler that will handle 100% of your amp tone, then get the X3. The X3 just has far to many amp models available, you're bound to find a few of them that you like.

Otherwise, always remember that you should try the gear out before you buy it. I live pretty far away from a guitar center but even I make the 2 hour trip a few times a year to actually play with some new gear.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#26
Great content, great organization, great write up in general. Didn't get the feeling you were pushing one or the other. Interesting to hear that the Digitech wins in the OD/Dist department. I know that was a sore spot for them leading up to this (I used to have an RP250).

If it wasn't for the floor space they take up I'd be all over one of these. I don't gig though. I like the looks of the RP better but like the handles on the X3 for some reason

Also, can you do some kind of clip or video comparison?

Typo on post #5 (I think you meant 'zero loss of tone')


Thanks again

PS: I believe Dan Donagan of Disturbed used either the RP1000 or the rack version to record the 'Indestructable' album. Not sure how true that is or if he used amps to etc...but that album has killer tone. Any one know more?
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Sep 24, 2010,
#27
Thanks for the PM. I'm going to read this and I should be getting my X3 in a few weeks as well so thanks again


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#28
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
Great content, great organization, great write up in general. Didn't get the feeling you were pushing one or the other. Interesting to hear that the Digitech wins in the OD/Dist department. I know that was a sore spot for them leading up to this (I used to have an RP250).

If it wasn't for the floor space they take up I'd be all over one of these. I don't gig though. I like the looks of the RP better but like the handles on the X3 for some reason

Also, can you do some kind of clip or video comparison?

Typo on post #5 (I think you meant 'zero loss of tone')


Thanks again

PS: I believe Dan Donagan of Disturbed used either the RP1000 or the rack version to record the 'Indestructable' album. Not sure how true that is or if he used amps to etc...but that album has killer tone. Any one know more?


I know several professional artists are using the rackmount version (GSP1101), however many of them are now migrating to the Axe FX.

Thanks for finding that typo; i will get it corrected.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#29
Quote by theraven871
I have had a G-Major and owned a G-Major II for about a week (before returning it).
I used it in conjuction with my Pod X3 Live and with various tube amps I've owned. Now, there are not many bad things I can say about the G-Major....the G-Major II on the other hand didn't really add enough features (basically just an intelligent harmonizer) to make it worth "upgrading". For how cheap you can get a G-Major I these days, i would recommend that first.

Personally I would prefer a RP1000 to a G-Major II. Or if you wanted a rackmount unit, then you could get a GSP1101 (rackmount version of the RP1000). Personally, I feel its effects are just as good, and better in some circumstances. But there are quite a bit more effects in the Digitech units & they have some amp modeling. Taking that into consideration, I'm not sure why someone would take the G-Major over the GSP1101/RP1000.

Also, on a side note, did everyone hear about the new update for the GSP1101? You can now load your own IR/Cab Impulses into it. Up to now, the Axe FX was the only modeler that allowed you to do this.

Also, I should make clear that I've always loathed digitech products in the past. Their amp modeling always sounded awful to me. But these new products really perform well.

No product will completely replace a tube amp for me. Even the Axe Fx has its shortcomings tonewise. But these units sound GOOD and that is what is important.

Interesting, I might have to look into them then. If I can load my own impulses, this could be badass.

Plus, Digitech stuff usually goes for dirt cheap on the used market
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#30
Quote by MatrixClaw
Interesting, I might have to look into them then. If I can load my own impulses, this could be badass.

Plus, Digitech stuff usually goes for dirt cheap on the used market


You'll need to download the firmware for the GSP1101 from www.mustbebeta.com

There are, of course, some limitations on this. However, I hear that RedWirez work fine. Those are some of the nicest impulses I've heard.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#31
Can you plug in two guitars into the X3 Live? Because it says you can use 2 guitars with the dual tone thing, tho there's only 1 input if I'm correct


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#32
Quote by haceteunosmates
Can you plug in two guitars into the X3 Live? Because it says you can use 2 guitars with the dual tone thing, tho there's only 1 input if I'm correct

Yes, you can plug two guitars into the X3 live and let each have their own (completely independant) signal chain. (There are multiple inputs)
You could also plug in a guitar & a bass guitar, guitar & vocals, bass guitar & vocals etc.

As far as functionality & setup options go, the Pod is unmatched.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#33
i really liked to read this =) i'm not interested in any modelling unit, I already have a pod xt live and a lot of great gear, but it was extremely interesting, for sure one of the best reads I've had on UG for a long while =)
also surprised to see the digitech was that good, none of their products ever impressed me before
#34
Quote by Darkflame
i really liked to read this =) i'm not interested in any modelling unit, I already have a pod xt live and a lot of great gear, but it was extremely interesting, for sure one of the best reads I've had on UG for a long while =)
also surprised to see the digitech was that good, none of their products ever impressed me before


To be 100% honest. I've always hated digitech modeling in the past.
Their amp modeling sounded awful to my ears and their effects sounded either too digital or too pronounced. While I cannot speak for their cheaper units, they have definitely closed the gap with the RP1000 & GSP1101. I definitely got the impression that they were serious about these modelers and not just trying to throw a product on the market to "cash in" on the current trend.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#35
^that's great to hear =)
I have a Digitech Turbo Flange somewhere that I barely ever used because it just sounded sterile and bleh, I liked it, but it wasn't any better than a Boss one, and that's the problem with digitech if you ask me... they try to be like boss, or so it seems
glad to hear they beat them with this =)
#36
Would you say the RP500 is as good as the RP1000 tone/effect-wise? I realize that there aren't as many effects, but I don't really need to spend all that extra money on other stuff I don't need at all...
#37
Quote by sleepofangels64
Would you say the RP500 is as good as the RP1000 tone/effect-wise? I realize that there aren't as many effects, but I don't really need to spend all that extra money on other stuff I don't need at all...


There are some people that will tell you that the RP500 is just a RP1000 with less buttons. Unfortunately this is not true. I only have limited experience with the RP500 but I have found that it doesn't sound as great as the RP1000. Plus its missing some switches and effects/amp models.

If you're serious about picking up a digitech modeler, I would save the extra cash and get the RP1000. Right now they are having $100 off on new ones, or you can pickup a used RP1000 on ebay for very little money.

Many of the features that make the RP1000 great are just not available on the RP500. Still, if you're on a budget and can only afford the RP500, I'm sure you'll be happy with it. Get what is going to fit your budget. Just keep in mind that for a slight bit more money, you can get the RP1000.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#38
Quote by fly135
Also no pitch shifter/whammy on the X3.



coughcoughbendereffectcoughcough
Quote by Demonikk
'Practice amp' = amp you practice with? In my case, Peavey 6505+ and 4x12
I don't do things small


Except children.
#39
Great review covered a lot areas... as i don't own either of these M/FX units i can't really give much of an opinion about the units, one thing i can say is i have owned a Zoom G7.1ut since 2006 and have never had a day where i have thought about upgrading or purchasing another unit. I have spent a great deal of time learning to program it including changing the waveform on patches so i can create sometimes subtle sometimes drastic changes to patches.... i can't say enough about the Zoom and as a working muso that plays in two bands and i also do session work (so i cover most sounds and styles of guitar music) i have never had 1 day where it has let me down..... as i said a very concise and in depth review.... Cheers...
#40
Quote by Talon64
Great review covered a lot areas... as i don't own either of these M/FX units i can't really give much of an opinion about the units, one thing i can say is i have owned a Zoom G7.1ut since 2006 and have never had a day where i have thought about upgrading or purchasing another unit. I have spent a great deal of time learning to program it including changing the waveform on patches so i can create sometimes subtle sometimes drastic changes to patches.... i can't say enough about the Zoom and as a working muso that plays in two bands and i also do session work (so i cover most sounds and styles of guitar music) i have never had 1 day where it has let me down..... as i said a very concise and in depth review.... Cheers...

Never had much experience with the zoom units. Glad to hear that you're happy with what you have. For me, I'm ALWAYS on the lookout for "the next big thing".
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
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