#1
Or even just general exercises?

I've been playing about 2 years and have been neglecting my ear (tab *****).

What can I do to effectively train my ear? And can you please state what that will do in the long run? For example, say: "Learning intervals will make you better at ....", "Transcribing will make you better at ...." or is it all the same thing?

What would be ideal is: something I could maybe put on my iPod and listen to/do (like an app) and just do it all the time, like in bed or on the bus.

Thanks in advance.
#4
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Or even just general exercises? [...]

What would be ideal is: something I could maybe put on my iPod and listen to/do (like an app) and just do it all the time, like in bed or on the bus.

Thanks in advance.

Yup. Learn intervals. Learn to recognise them, and learn to play them.

There are several ways you can learn to recognise intervals, some of them you can do all day long as long as you have access to music. The following is a good read, it also contains links to two free ear training websites http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/ear-training/perfect-pitch-relative-pitch/
#5
Quote by willemhdb
Yup. Learn intervals. Learn to recognise them, and learn to play them.

There are several ways you can learn to recognise intervals, some of them you can do all day long as long as you have access to music. The following is a good read, it also contains links to two free ear training websites http://www.theloneguitaristblog.com/ear-training/perfect-pitch-relative-pitch/


Thanks for the response!

But like, lets say I just learn intervals, is this all I need to do to get a good ear or are there other areas I have to train myself in?

One thing I really am not good at is just pitch in general, a lot of the time when I try to transcribe stuff I get the intervals right but it's in the wrong key.

Although I guess that is quite hard ...
#6
Figure out very simple melodies to start off, like twinkle twinkle little star. Eventually you'll get there. I used to be in the same spot, now I can transcribe pretty decently and figure out the chords too.
#7
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Thanks for the response!

But like, lets say I just learn intervals, is this all I need to do to get a good ear or are there other areas I have to train myself in?

One thing I really am not good at is just pitch in general, a lot of the time when I try to transcribe stuff I get the intervals right but it's in the wrong key.

Although I guess that is quite hard ...


Other areas to train yourself is to listen to what the bass does in songs. If you know what the bass does, then you can figure out the chords, because the bass plays the roots of the chords (along with fill/embellishment notes). Really try to hear it. Then try and bring it back in your mind some time later and try and play what you hear from memory. That's a great exercise. The more you train that, the better you get at it.

It helps being in a very quiet room so you can hear the music clearly in your head.

Also, don't worry about key. If you know the intervals, you'll know how to play something. Key is not that important. You can always go back to the original song and figure out the key.
#8
Google good ear or music theory.net (something like that)
they have pretty much all ear training there.
make sure you start simple! maybe starting with a fix root for awhile before moving and learn what each interval sounds. A good idea is to know some song with that interval like Star War theme starts with a perfect 5th. Jaws theme is a minor second etc etc



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#9
Taken from a thread a few down from yours.

Go to goodear.com

Do the interval training, chord training etc. BUT! Please please please do this. Find those on your guitar before you click what interval / chord it is. Find it, make sure you have it right, then click which one you think it is. This not only trains your ear to hear these things, but also says where it is on the guitar. It has worked for me, and I can guarantee it (i actually want to write a program and lesson for this).

Do that for like an hour a day, you'll see improvement in a week. Once you're doing decent in that (average about 24/25 per training tool) start transcribing songs. It'll be a breeze.
Quote by Guitardude19
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Tele's

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#11
Umm. Yes and no. If you're ear is advanced enough, that would be the next logical step to take, differentiating between notes. Starting off doing the perfect pitch, it'll be more like guesswork. Think of it as a goal to work towards!
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#12
theres actually multiple ipod apps.
one is called melody ear trainer, which plays notes beginning with simple intervals, progressing up to diatonic intervals and chromatic intervals, in groups of 2-5 iirc. another is called slow down music trainer, which is a great tool for dividing a track into managable sections that you can loop and slow down.
#13
Quote by tehREALcaptain
theres actually multiple ipod apps.
one is called melody ear trainer, which plays notes beginning with simple intervals, progressing up to diatonic intervals and chromatic intervals, in groups of 2-5 iirc. another is called slow down music trainer, which is a great tool for dividing a track into managable sections that you can loop and slow down.


And are they worth it?
#15
Ok, so I got this thing called Karajan for my iPod and it has an interval, chords, scales, pitch, temp and key signatures trainer.

The intervals is good I guess, but only has Prime, Major Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Octave (which is all I need for now) Ive done 100, all ascending, and got 30 wrong and 70 right, and am finding it pretty frustrating at times haha but no pain no gain.

The other sections aren't as good. For the chords you only have to pick between major and minor. I also tried the key signatures one because we have to read sheet in music class, but the only options are Cmaj/Amin, Fmaj/Dmin, Gmaj/Emin, which are all so easy.

And the pitch one, it's not like goodear where you work you're way up from 3 notes, but you dive straight into the whole octave from C2 to C3. I tried it for the laugh and actually got 2 right and 7 wrong, but I was only off by a semitone!!! Couldn't believe it ..

Does anyone else use this app?
#16
I still stand by my post, good-ear.com and find each one on the guitar.
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#17
Try matching pitches with your voice then find them in the guitar. Using ear training websites is helpful as well for learning to discern differences in intervals, chords, and scales. Also, transcribe. Practice things that you have to use your ear for, and you will improve.

I always use this site for ear training
http://www.musictheory.net/exercises

I must say that transcription has helped to develop my ear the most.
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#18
i'm not crazy about karajan. i think melody ear trainer and the slow down trainer are really where its at (one makes transcribing much easier, the other is a fun little ear trainer). The advantage of ipod ear trainers is that you can do them when your on the train, waiting online at the grocery store, on an elevator etc. Though I did what blurry 505 suggested and it did help a lot (I did it to prepare for the ear training part of the Berklee audition--which I ended up being extremely prepared for) . Another thing you can do is to learn solffegio and practice sight singing. i'd suggest sitting at a piano (or with an in-tune guitar) and practice playing a C and singing a perfect fifth in good intonation (sol) then go down to the third (mi) then up to sol and then up to do. Then you can work on going from do to ti and la to fa and mi to re, or vice versa. After that singing a major scale by interval (do re re do, do re mi re do, do re mi fa mi re do, do re mi fa sol fa mi re do, do re mi fa sol la sol fa mi re do etc.) and then in thirds (both do mi re fa mi sol etc and do re mi do re mi fa re etc). Then get a copy of melodia sight singing (which runs about 15 dollars) and practice sight singing out of it with a drone while doing the same solfegio excersizes with your harmonic and melodic minor scales

EDIT: also, if you don't do this already sing along with your guitar every time you practice. Theres also a program called earmaster which might be worth looking into.
#19
Quote by Steel8909
Figure out very simple melodies to start off, like twinkle twinkle little star. Eventually you'll get there. I used to be in the same spot, now I can transcribe pretty decently and figure out the chords too.

seems to be a good idea.. ahahaha,,
#21
I'm in a pretty similar boat to the thread starter, I've been using Ear Trainer for a couple of days now. Should I leave the 'fixed note' section on? I'm not too sure whether I'm really listening for he interval, or whether I'm 'cheating' and just know which note corresponds to each interval.

I kept the 'fixed note' setting on yesterday and got 62/75 right, then today I turned it off, (the same intervals are used but the starting note isn't fixed), and only got 47/75. Do you guys think I should keep trying with the 'fixed note' or to progress to the unfixed note?

TL;DR, not sure whether I'm learning by keeping the first note fixed.
Looking to buy a Fender Jagstang, u sellin?
Last edited by Cal UK at Sep 26, 2010,
#22
I would "un-fix" the note. With a score range like that much different I would really try that. When transcribing or playing, you never really play with a fixed note either. It's like practicing chromatic scales (you know them, but never use them) :p
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#24
musictheory.net has some badass exersizes for training your ear to recognize intervals, notes, voicings, chords, etc. and it has tons of valuable information any musician needs to know. highly recommended
keep writing. keep dreaming.

keep the notes coming...

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#25
I think you really need to work on understanding the sound and intervals of the major scale. Learn to sing any note in the C Major scale.

In fact, I'm currently working on some practice materials to help people do this on my own website.

Starting with just C and E (Major Third) then adding G (Perfect Fifth) - practice this a lot and you internalize the sound of a major chord - add A, D, B and F in that order and you gain complete control of the scale and all the implied intervals.

Regarding commercially available courses - I think David Lucas Burge's Relative Pitch Ear Training Course is excellent - and EarMaster Pro is good software to keep practising.
Last edited by BarcelonaGuitar at Sep 29, 2010,