#1
Anyhow, lately I've been looking around for some ways to develop my legato technique. Does anybody know of any practice techniques or scales (which is what I'm really after) to perfect my legato technique?

Thanks UG
#3
sorry to hijack your thread, but im a little confused about what it is exactly.

is it when(since you said joe satriani ill use him) he plays quick short passages that are all hammer-ons that sound really smooth and flow very quickly?

like at around 1:10
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4fPv450OYM
#4
It's mainly a matter of building up strength & stamina in all your fingers through repetitive exercise. I like really trill exercises. Lots people hate them but they sure as hell work for finger strength and speed.

You can also pick any combination of fingers and repeat short legato phrases instead of trills. Or learn some legato passages of songs you like.

For scales, try playing them with no picking at all (hammer or pull every note). There's tons of ways to build up this type of strength really.... Whatever suits you.

My only suggestion is don't over-do it. Dedicate some time when you practice to this specifically - and stay on it for a while - then move on. You'll get much better results that way than trying to make it all happen at once.

edit: running out now but I can post some exercises later if you want.
#5
Quote by cringer

edit: running out now but I can post some exercises later if you want.



could you pm them to me?
#6
Quote by cringer
It's mainly a matter of building up strength & stamina in all your fingers through repetitive exercise. I like really trill exercises. Lots people hate them but they sure as hell work for finger strength and speed.

You can also pick any combination of fingers and repeat short legato phrases instead of trills. Or learn some legato passages of songs you like.

For scales, try playing them with no picking at all (hammer or pull every note). There's tons of ways to build up this type of strength really.... Whatever suits you.

My only suggestion is don't over-do it. Dedicate some time when you practice to this specifically - and stay on it for a while - then move on. You'll get much better results that way than trying to make it all happen at once.

edit: running out now but I can post some exercises later if you want.


Cool, that would really help me out. Go ahead and post them on here so everyone can practice with them as well.
#7
G|-5-7-9-10-9-7-5-3-5-7-9-7-5-3-2-3-5-7-5-3-2-0-2~
.|--h-h-t--p-p-p-s-h-h-t-p-p-p-s-h-h-t-p-p-p-p-h-~
A little legato run at the end of a solo from SikTh's "Where Do We Fall". Pick the first note, hammer, then tap... pull off, slide down a fret and repeat until the end.
#8
Quote by Dayn
G|-5-7-9-10-9-7-5-3-5-7-9-7-5-3-2-3-5-7-5-3-2-0-2~
.|--h-h-t--p-p-p-s-h-h-t-p-p-p-s-h-h-t-p-p-p-p-h-~
A little legato run at the end of a solo from SikTh's "Where Do We Fall". Pick the first note, hammer, then tap... pull off, slide down a fret and repeat until the end.



Thanks, this really helped me with my legato technique. A lot
#9
Quote by malmsteensolo
Cool, that would really help me out. Go ahead and post them on here so everyone can practice with them as well.

These are the most efficient way I know of to build up strength and stamina in the fingers. Great for legato obviously but I find they benefit your fret hand for everything. Remember not to over-do one session. They are quick exercises to be done on a regular basis over time. Fingers need to rest between sessions. Also be completely warmed up before doing any this stuff.

I recommend using a metronome. It's not a must... but staying in time pushes you the "right" amount... and also helps your accuracy at higher tempos.
You also need a timer.

Aim for articulation, clean sounding notes with the finger tips. You want to stay relaxed as possible, but at the same time it's going to be strenuous.... So you gotta be aware of the discomfort as you fatigue, but not let that transfer to your arm, neck and back by trying to overcompensate. Just something to be aware of.
Don't worry if you need to rest or cannot complete something at all. It gets easier over time.
---------------------------
I got this one-minute idea from Vai. I added the tempos for working speed.
BPM and time spans are totally random. If it's too much (or not enough) for you then adjust accordingly.

Basic trilling...
Pick a fret/string. (be sure to vary this from set to set, covering the whole neck)
For example we'll pick B string Fret 5. So frets 5,6,7,8 using fingers 1,2,3,4

At 80 BPM, trill all finger combinations for one full minute each - use your timer. 4 notes (2 hammers 2 pulls) per click.
1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4
Then put metronome to 120 BPM and repeat all trills for 20 seconds each.
Last, metromone to 160 BPM and repeat all trills for 10 seconds each.
---------------------------
Same as above but do some stretched finger combinations.
---------------------------
Got from Satriani. I added in the metronome use, so it's optional.
To a comfortable tempo, play frets 1-3-5 across all 6 strings (3 notes/click) using hammers , then move the pattern up 2-4-6 back across all strings. Continue to the top of neck and back down.
Then reverse it to 5-3-1, 6-4-2 etc. using pulls.
You can pick the first note of each triplet if needed... but for the purpose of exercise, you might want to strive for no picking eventually. Build up your speed gradually always keeping it clean.
----------------------------
Far as I know, this is my own creation... I demo it at fret 12 because of the stretch. Do it wherever comfortable.

fret 12 = finger 1, fret 14 = finger 2, fret 15 = finger 3, fret 17 = finger 4.
(4 notes/click)
17-12-14-12-17-12-15-12 (repeat)
Start at very slow tempo for one minute. Then rest. Then raise the tempo 10 BPM for the next minute.
Repeat until you can't keep up (or had enough).
----------------------------
This is from a Vai solo. Repeat this triplet pattern using only hammers and pulls - no picking.

E|--3-----------------3----------------
B|-----7--5--3--5--7-----7--5--3--5--7-....

That's only a few. There's tons of ways to exercise... you can make up your own too.
Hope it helps.
#10
Speaking of Satriani a good way to build strength in the fingers is what he calls 'fluttering'.

Take your 1st finger on the 1st fret of th 1st string. Use your 2nd finger on the 2nd fret and repeatedly hammer-on and pull off. Then place your 2nd finger on the 2nd fret, using your 3rd finger to do the same action as last time on the 3rd fret. Then place your 3rd finger on the 3rd fret and use your 4th finger on the 4th fret as before. Hope that makes sense.
It didn't take long to realise
The safest place was not her arms, but her eyes
Where she can't see you
For her gaze, it blisters;
Grey skin to cinders
#11
Quote by cringer
These are the most efficient way I know of to build up strength and stamina in the fingers. Great for legato obviously but I find they benefit your fret hand for everything. Remember not to over-do one session. They are quick exercises to be done on a regular basis over time. Fingers need to rest between sessions. Also be completely warmed up before doing any this stuff.

I recommend using a metronome. It's not a must... but staying in time pushes you the "right" amount... and also helps your accuracy at higher tempos.
You also need a timer.

Aim for articulation, clean sounding notes with the finger tips. You want to stay relaxed as possible, but at the same time it's going to be strenuous.... So you gotta be aware of the discomfort as you fatigue, but not let that transfer to your arm, neck and back by trying to overcompensate. Just something to be aware of.
Don't worry if you need to rest or cannot complete something at all. It gets easier over time.
---------------------------
I got this one-minute idea from Vai. I added the tempos for working speed.
BPM and time spans are totally random. If it's too much (or not enough) for you then adjust accordingly.

Basic trilling...
Pick a fret/string. (be sure to vary this from set to set, covering the whole neck)
For example we'll pick B string Fret 5. So frets 5,6,7,8 using fingers 1,2,3,4

At 80 BPM, trill all finger combinations for one full minute each - use your timer. 4 notes (2 hammers 2 pulls) per click.
1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4
Then put metronome to 120 BPM and repeat all trills for 20 seconds each.
Last, metromone to 160 BPM and repeat all trills for 10 seconds each.
---------------------------
Same as above but do some stretched finger combinations.
---------------------------
Got from Satriani. I added in the metronome use, so it's optional.
To a comfortable tempo, play frets 1-3-5 across all 6 strings (3 notes/click) using hammers , then move the pattern up 2-4-6 back across all strings. Continue to the top of neck and back down.
Then reverse it to 5-3-1, 6-4-2 etc. using pulls.
You can pick the first note of each triplet if needed... but for the purpose of exercise, you might want to strive for no picking eventually. Build up your speed gradually always keeping it clean.
----------------------------
Far as I know, this is my own creation... I demo it at fret 12 because of the stretch. Do it wherever comfortable.

fret 12 = finger 1, fret 14 = finger 2, fret 15 = finger 3, fret 17 = finger 4.
(4 notes/click)
17-12-14-12-17-12-15-12 (repeat)
Start at very slow tempo for one minute. Then rest. Then raise the tempo 10 BPM for the next minute.
Repeat until you can't keep up (or had enough).
----------------------------
This is from a Vai solo. Repeat this triplet pattern using only hammers and pulls - no picking.

E|--3-----------------3----------------
B|-----7--5--3--5--7-----7--5--3--5--7-....

That's only a few. There's tons of ways to exercise... you can make up your own too.
Hope it helps.



Thanks. I've been having a little trouble with trilling and these exercises are really helping. I actually saw a satriani Video using that 1, 2 and 1, 3 technique.

That little Steve vai lick earlier you posted is what I'm really look for to help me with legato.
#12
Quote by malmsteensolo
Thanks. I've been having a little trouble with trilling and these exercises are really helping. I actually saw a satriani Video using that 1, 2 and 1, 3 technique.

That little Steve vai lick earlier you posted is what I'm really look for to help me with legato.

Cool.
Yes when both vai and satriani are giving the same advice... I think it's a good idea to listen.

But following blindly isn't always the best way either. Isolate your own specific problem areas, and then make up an exercise to address that directly.

For example I added the tempo variation in order to work on faster trills, which I felt was a weak point for me personally. As it turns out, that really helped me a lot. Everybody's different. Good luck.
#13
Yeah, my trills is really my only problem area, legato wise. Of course it's mainly on the higher frets. Which I guess everyone has problems with.
#14
Quote by rickyj
sorry to hijack your thread, but im a little confused about what it is exactly.

is it when(since you said joe satriani ill use him) he plays quick short passages that are all hammer-ons that sound really smooth and flow very quickly?

like at around 1:10
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4fPv450OYM



Yeah legato is basically hammering on, pulling off, sliding, and Tapping. To put it simple it is playing notes without picking.