#1
Well me and my band are from Peru and we would be very interested on making a somewhat short-scale US tour. But we have no idea where to start/who to contact. Any guidelines please?
#5
Quote by piszczel
Cause it's expensive as hell.

Also I'd make sure that you have some kind of large fanbase in the US before touring it

Oh ok then thanks, and how could I promote a foreign band in the US besides touring?? (seriously, I wanna know)
#6
You don't need a large fanbase already, the point of touring is to expand the fanbase and start new ones in different areas.

Ideally you want a whole heap of gigs with already-established bands in different areas. This will ensure that people will actually come to see you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
Quote by AlanHB
You don't need a large fanbase already, the point of touring is to expand the fanbase and start new ones in different areas.

Ideally you want a whole heap of gigs with already-established bands in different areas. This will ensure that people will actually come to see you.


This ^^^ and if you dig enough you can find venues that do "new music nights", open mic nights, and other things like that where new bands can get on the bills. That or contact some bands in the areas your planning on playing and seeing if you can get on a show with them.
#8
Rule #1 for any unsigned band looking to tour is MAKE FRIENDS with bands around the country months before you're even planning on going. Ask them if they can squeeze you on a show somewhere. Facebook, Myspace and Twitter are your friends. You want them to know your name. Promise them you'll hook them up with a show in your 'hood if they help you out.
#9
Scope out a booking agent or just start contacting more DIY orientated venues.
#10
If you're looking for locations, I think the East Coast would be a good idea, since there are a lot of big cities in fairly close proximity. You can drive from one city to the next in about 2-3 hours, give or take, depending on traffic. Like, if you start out in Boston, you can just go straight south and hit Hartford, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC, Richmond and Raleigh. Also, I know a couple of the cities like New York and DC it may be hard to get a gig in the city itself, but there are still some fairly major venues in the city's suburbs. As mentioned before, if you get in touch with bands from the area, they'll know the lay of the land a little better, and can help you find an appropriate venue.
Schecter Hellraiser V1 / Schecter Stiletto Extreme 4 / Gallien Krueger 400RB / Hartke Transporter 4x10 / Digitech BP200 / Pod Studio GX
#11
North East is a REAT Place to start!!

E-mail some bands and make some friends. Also, get a CD and other stuff to sell, that's where the real money comes from.

If your band is really that good and entertaining and people like you, they will buy a $1 sticker or a T-Shirt/CD combo and THAT'S where your money will come from.
#12
Also, something to think about is the cost of flying your gear from Peru to the States. It will more than likely be very expensive.
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

#13
Quote by druggietoad2k5
Also, something to think about is the cost of flying your gear from Peru to the States. It will more than likely be very expensive.


That's a good point. Alternatively, I know that when some large bands do overseas tours, they bring some stuff with them, and rent others from music stores. Renting amps and a drum kit might be something to look into.

Also, I know some small bands will share equipment with each other. Making friends will help you with this, I'm sure at least a few bands will share amps amps and drums for a night, especially if you offer them a favor in exchange.
Schecter Hellraiser V1 / Schecter Stiletto Extreme 4 / Gallien Krueger 400RB / Hartke Transporter 4x10 / Digitech BP200 / Pod Studio GX
#14
I think the way to go here may be gig exchanges.

*Get searching on the net for an American band that's in a similar vein to yourselves.
*Organise some gigs for them in Peru and lend them your band's gear. (it's always a good idea to work as roadies for them, that way you can keep an eye on your gear and make sure they're not misusing it)
*Get them to return the favour.

If it works, you could try it with several bands in different parts of the states.
#15
Quote by SlackerBabbath
I think the way to go here may be gig exchanges.

*Get searching on the net for an American band that's in a similar vein to yourselves.
*Organise some gigs for them in Peru and lend them your band's gear. (it's always a good idea to work as roadies for them, that way you can keep an eye on your gear and make sure they're not misusing it)
*Get them to return the favour.

If it works, you could try it with several bands in different parts of the states.



Unlikely. The sheer expense of flying to Peru, a country that is a small market with a relatively devalued currency means that any band that goes there without a relatively large fan-base in place will automatically lose a huge sum of money. Even if they try and tour surrounding countries while they're at it, the amount of time that will go into getting work visas and the like makes it pretty unviable. I can't imagine a struggling American band heading to a country that is pretty much non-existant on the musical map.