#1
I am having trouble getting farther in guitar right. I can't afford lessons and may never be able to. I don't know music notation so my friend said learn by ear. Well maybe it seems simple just listen to the music. But when you hear a lightning fast riff how am I suppose to know that without theory or knowledge of scales.

I am in love with like every old school death metal band you can name. But I look at the guitar tabs and I have a program called guitar pro, they sound nothing like the original. I have the realistic sound engine and still nothing like the original. The tabs are wrong that's why.

how do I train myself to learn by ear. Only thing I can do is tune by guitar in standard by ear.
#4
Guitar pro isn't supposed to sound like the song, it just shows what is supposed to be played and gives an example with midi.
#5
Quote by slityourguts
I have the realistic sound engine and still nothing like the original. The tabs are wrong that's why.

The RSE is about as realistic as your expectations of it.
#6
Quote by Gary.Blizzard
Guitar pro isn't supposed to sound like the song, it just shows what is supposed to be played and gives an example with midi.


plenty of tabs have glaring errors. you'd be hard pressed to find a tab of a metal song without some obvious mistake that a seasoned ear player would have caught.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#7
Start by learning simple songs by ear. This means, don't start with lightning fast riffs. Try learning simple vocal melodies first and then move on to relatively basic lead guitar riffs. Once you familiarize yourself with the fretboard and how notes sound you can start on the lightning fast riffs.

Also as mentioned, use the slow down feature in Windows media player.
Listen to jazz, it'll make you a better guitar player.


Whatever you do, stay creative
#8
Quote by Lugnaz987
Start by learning simple songs by ear. This means, don't start with lightning fast riffs. Try learning simple vocal melodies first and then move on to relatively basic lead guitar riffs. Once you familiarize yourself with the fretboard and how notes sound you can start on the lightning fast riffs.

Also as mentioned, use the slow down feature in Windows media player.

I was about to write exactly what lugnaz said here. Don't start with lightning fast death metal riffs, hell I doubt I could figure that shit out and I consider myself pretty good with my ear. Start with simple songs, who cares if you don't like them, they're just for your education not for your personal preference.
#9
well that makes total sense yea but I mean.

Like what if its a get scale or something? I mean there could be a thousand different spots on the fretboard. Should I just go a long and fret each place. I mean what if it's a power chord. I don't know power chords - well I do but not like by names only tabs.
#10
Well learning some music theory will take a lot of the guesswork out of the equation.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by AlanHB
Well learning some music theory will take a lot of the guesswork out of the equation.


Quoted for truth
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#12
I found that once I started to get familiar with the modes in different keys, I was able to play songs by ear a lot.

Check out gosk.com, it's a quick and easy reference for chords, scales, and some arpeggios. A lot of the fast runs in songs are just going up and down a scale.

If you want to start with something painfully easy, try out some generic metalcore songs. You know, those songs where they keep going back to the open note. Just get in the right br00tal tuning and play away. From my experiences, most of them will be in the minor key of the open string, one octave up as the root. So that's the 5th fret on the 5th string (assuming you're in some drop tuning).
#13
Quote by Aturaya
I found that once I started to get familiar with the modes in different keys, I was able to play songs by ear a lot.


You mean scales, but I support you all the way.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
learn the normative function of chords flow chart.

iii -> vi -> IV or ii -> vii° or V(7) -> I

in addition:

iii can go straight to IV.

IV can go to ii.

IV can also go directly to I.

V can go to iv (in case of a deceptive cadence OR playing green day's "basketcase")

i feel like i'm forgetting one or two.

that's only for major keys. the minor key chart is mainly the same but the qualities are different (and vary depending on whether you're using natural or harmonic ... or melodic i guess)

as far as learning leads and stuff by ear?

http://www.good-ear.com/servlet/EarTrainer

practice hearing intervals (and eventually chords. including extended chords). learn at your own pace. don't be afraid to take it slow.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Sep 23, 2010,